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Thread: Upgrade advice

  1. #1
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Dominicus's Avatar
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    Upgrade advice

    All right, my knowledge of PC components and building/upgrading a desktop are, to put it nicely, limited. But I know that around here there are a few people with the knowledge, so I hope that you guys would be able to help me out/get me started.

    I was looking into the possibilities of upgrading my desktop to keep up, as due to budget constrains I will not be able to do a full replacement any time soon.

    So, what part would be most beneficial to upgrade first? Or is it, don't bother and save up for a full replacement, can't be saved.

    I thank you for your help.

    Details:
    AMD Athlon II X4 635 2.90 GHz
    MSI 870A-G54
    Asus Radeon HD 5670 1024 MB
    Kingston HyperX Dual Channel 4 GB, PC3-10666, 1333 MHz, 7, Non-ECC, Kit Of 2
    Kingston HyperX Dual Channel 8 GB, PC3-10666, 1333 MHz, 7, Non-ECC, Kit Of 2
    WD Caviar GP 500 GB, 5400 Rpm, 32 MB, S-ATA II/300
    Samsung SH-S223C/BEBE S-ATA
    Antec Basiq Series BP-430EC 430 Watt , 20+24 Pins
    Steam: Dominicus

  2. #2
    Moderator QuantaCat's Avatar
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    Graphics card & SSD.

    How much space do you have, and is the GPU card a PCIe 16x?
    - Tom De Roeck.

    verse publications & The Shopkeeper, an interactive short.

    "Quantacat's name is still recognised even if he watches on with detached eyes like Peter Molyneux over a cube in 3D space, staring at it with tears in his eyes, softly whispering... Someday they'll get it."

  3. #3
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Dominicus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuantaCat View Post
    How much space do you have, and is the GPU card a PCIe 16x?
    yes, I belief it is.
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  4. #4
    Moderator QuantaCat's Avatar
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    Then you should be fine, You can either buy the older HD 78xx models, which are good and cheaper, or you go for the newest AMD stuff which should probably fit as well.

    As for an SSD, you can still use the 500gb HDD, and get a 128gb one extra where you install the OS on, for about 70-80€.

    Itll make all of the file stuff as well as loading games and so on quicker. The CPU should still be great for games, and I think 12gb of RAM is quite enough.

    So youre looking at about 200€ if you go for the older GPU, probably 300-350 if you get a newer GPU.
    - Tom De Roeck.

    verse publications & The Shopkeeper, an interactive short.

    "Quantacat's name is still recognised even if he watches on with detached eyes like Peter Molyneux over a cube in 3D space, staring at it with tears in his eyes, softly whispering... Someday they'll get it."

  5. #5
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Your CPU isn't completely embarrassing, and the power supply would support at least a moderately powerful graphics card. A GTX 750 Ti if you want to save power, or eg. an R7 260X or R9 270 if you're more interested in getting the most performance for your money. The R9 270 is about the most your power supply would work with (only has one 6-pin PCIe power connector).

  6. #6
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuantaCat View Post
    Then you should be fine, You can either buy the older HD 78xx models, which are good and cheaper, or you go for the newest AMD stuff which should probably fit as well.
    The HD 7000 series is more expensive than the new R7/R9 200 series. Most of the 200 series is just rebranded 7000 series cards with lower price tags, so there's no reason to go for the 7000 series. Unless you buy used parts.

  7. #7
    Moderator QuantaCat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sakkura View Post
    The HD 7000 series is more expensive than the new R7/R9 200 series. Most of the 200 series is just rebranded 7000 series cards with lower price tags, so there's no reason to go for the 7000 series. Unless you buy used parts.
    my mistake! sorry!
    - Tom De Roeck.

    verse publications & The Shopkeeper, an interactive short.

    "Quantacat's name is still recognised even if he watches on with detached eyes like Peter Molyneux over a cube in 3D space, staring at it with tears in his eyes, softly whispering... Someday they'll get it."

  8. #8
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Dominicus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sakkura View Post
    Your CPU isn't completely embarrassing, and the power supply would support at least a moderately powerful graphics card. A GTX 750 Ti if you want to save power, or eg. an R7 260X or R9 270 if you're more interested in getting the most performance for your money. The R9 270 is about the most your power supply would work with (only has one 6-pin PCIe power connector).
    Thanks (also to you quanta), I will look into an R9 270 then, as they are just within budget.
    Steam: Dominicus

  9. #9
    Network Hub
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    A good way to tell whether to upgrade your CPU or your video is to run a game that you enjoy, that isn't running as fast as you'd like, at a resolution one step higher than you care about, and watch the frame count, maybe with something like Fraps. If you're losing like 1% of your fps, you need a new CPU. If you're losing 10% or more of your frame rate, you need a new video card.

    I offer that advice because everybody's needs are slightly different. At an extreme end, if you're a Counterstrike fiend with a 14" CRT, you're probably going to get more out of a new CPU than out of a new video card.

    As you suggest, you would probably save more by waiting for a new computer as compared to upgrading. What is your computer doing poorly? What are you unhappy with?

  10. #10
    in the summer time, you'll be able to cook on that AMD processor, go with Intel the the i7 4th generation, trust me, it's a beast ready to serve.

    Go for a two disk solution, get an SSD for your OS / basic applications and get a HDD for your games, typically games don't use the hard disk much so you'll be fine.

    You need a good graphics card and a good processor, and LOTS of memory, I'd recommend no less than 8 gigs, more if you can fit it.

    The motherboard, while important, won't make much difference as anything else, the more you pay for it the longer it'll last, but that's about it, other stuff on it depends on the max amount of memory which you'll never be able to reach anyway so don't bother about it. I had a $100 gigabyte board last me 7 years without a hitch.

    But if you really want top-notch go for ASROCK.

  11. #11
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by indieGameDev View Post
    in the summer time, you'll be able to cook on that AMD processor, go with Intel the the i7 4th generation, trust me, it's a beast ready to serve.
    That's not really true. It has a 95W TDP which is only very slightly higher than that of a Core i7-4770K. It's also easier to cool because it uses a larger process node and doesn't have poor thermal interface material under the heatspreader. The only negative is that the K10 architecture requires lower temperatures than Intel's last several architectures.

  12. #12
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Boris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sakkura View Post
    It's also easier to cool because it uses a larger process node
    This is not true.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sakkura View Post
    and doesn't have poor thermal interface material under the heatspreader.
    This is. They fixed it in the refresh versions though, the i7-4790K, which is the same price as the older i7-4770K.

  13. #13
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boris View Post
    This is not true.
    Yes it is. The larger process node means the same amount of heat is generated across a larger area, meaning there's more surface area for the heat to transfer across. This assists cooling.

    Note that a larger process node generally also means more power will be used overall. With a smaller process node, the power consumption of the CPU would have been lower - but it would also have been smaller to the point where the amount of heat transfer needed per surface area would have increased.

  14. #14
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Boris's Avatar
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    The die size on the 635 is 169mm2. The 4770k is 177mm2. That's larger, even though it's on a smaller process node.

    So, not true.

  15. #15
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    The Athlon II x4 635 has no integrated GPU. The Core i7-4770K has a large integrated GPU. Unlike the Core i7-4770K, the Athlon has no L3 cache.

  16. #16
    Lesser Hivemind Node Cei's Avatar
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    Grab me on Steam, Dom, we can have a chat :)

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