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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fanbuoy View Post
    Really? Why? Don't breasts have a greater tendency to become dry? I hate that in chicken. That delicate balance between undercooking and overcooking chicken is pretty much why I don't do much of it.
    Chicken can get dry-- but not as frequently when you grill it.

    Oh, you know, I just realized, I've been talking about "grilling" without being very specific. I mean, like barbecuing, over hot coals, outside. I don't know if there's some good word to indicate that and only that.

    It's funny-- your lamb is exactly like my lamb :)

    Also, making your own tortillas? Never tried it.
    I strongly recommend it. Just because I like to blab about cooking, here is my recipe for ~10 flour tortillas:

    Combine 1.5 cups all-purpose flour with 1 teaspoon baking powder, 0.5 tsp salt, mix; cut in 3 tablespoons of lard loosely. Mix with 0.5 cups cold-ish water. Mix but don't overwork. Let rest 30+ minutes. Divide into about 10 balls, knead each individual ball about 5 times (5 folds). Let rest 30+ minutes again. Roll each ball as thinly as you can; maybe 10" in diameter. Get a pan really hot-- cast iron works best, you want even heating over its surface. Pan should be hot enough that water droplets instantly start steaming and roll across its surface. Each tortilla needs only about 30 seconds of cooking per side; you may need to push the tortilla down to keep good contact with the pan, prevent the bubbles that form from burning.

    Available in metric upon request! Acceptable (tested) substitutions include bread flour, vegetable shortening. How much you cut in the fat and how much you work the dough ends up having large effects, so it's a bit of an art, but even before you figure out exactly how you like it done, it's delicious.

  2. #22
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Fanbuoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nate View Post
    Chicken can get dry-- but not as frequently when you grill it.
    Yeah, that's my impression. However, BBQ season in Sweden is pretty much only Summer and I'm rarely home then, so I really only grill chicken when it's handed to me. I do occasionally do chicken at home in the kitchen, but not often. (I'm quite fond of making a sauce from chicken, pesto, leek and cream, served with pasta.)

    It's funny-- your lamb is exactly like my lamb :)
    Well, your lamb must be absolutely scrumptious!

    Available in metric upon request!
    No need (I think). A cup is about 1.5 dl, right? Is the difference between wheat and corn tortillas which kind of flour you use? Also, when you write "lard" are we talking butter or actual lard, because I'm not sure where I'd go for that.

    I'm getting excited about this!

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fanbuoy View Post
    Well, your lamb must be absolutely scrumptious!
    I believe you mean your lamb, and it is :)

    No need (I think). A cup is about 1.5 dl, right?
    1 teaspoon == 5mL
    1 cup == 240mL
    10" == 25cm

    Is the difference between wheat and corn tortillas which kind of flour you use? Also, when you write "lard" are we talking butter or actual lard, because I'm not sure where I'd go for that.
    Corn tortillas are totally different. Simpler, in a way, but totally different. (They're just masa + water; masa is corn flour treated with lime(stone).) Even though the ingredients are simpler, I think it's harder to make (usable) corn tortillas.

    By lard, I mean animal (pig) lard. It's getting increasingly difficult to find around here as well. If you don't have any, vegetable shortening is fine. In the US, "vegetable shortening" is synonymous with Crisco, but I don't know what it'd be over there. I don't think butter would work very well, it's a little more liquid than lard or vegetable shortening, but I've never tried it.

    Pizza tonight. Got the dough rising right now. Some combination of red onion, garlic, pork sausage, green bell pepper, mushroom, and salami across two pizzas. Mozzarella cheese.

    Here are my techniques: My oven can't get to those gold-melting pizza oven temperatures, so I do a little bit of pre-fry on the crust in garlic, butter, and olive oil. I re-season my sausage (extra garlic, fennel seed) and then give it a light coat of flour. No toppings get pre-cooked, just cooked when the pizza goes in the oven. I use a tiny bit of anchovy in canned tomato sauce-- anchovy is like jalapeno in that I try to use just enough that people don't even consciously notice it. I peel my bell peppers, learned that from watching Jacques Pepin on TV :)
    Last edited by nate; 07-08-2014 at 11:12 PM.

  4. #24
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus SirKicksalot's Avatar
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    Inspired by Soylent, lately I've been throwing all sorts of stuff into the blender. Fruits, vegetables, eggs, milk and other dairy, fruit juice, soy milk, oats, coconut, actual nuts, spices, cocoa. Hard to get anything wrong.

    One day I'll probably throw in some meat, fish and the kitchen sink while I'm at it. It's so convenient.

  5. #25
    Obscure Node Scylla's Avatar
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    I love working with eggs, omelettes are my specialty!

  6. #26
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Wenz's Avatar
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    mmmh palatschinke
    post in progress

  7. #27
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    Today I tried my hand at banh mi (Vietnamese sandwiches).

    The most important thing about banh mi, as far as I'm concerned, is the bread. And I still am not making the bread I wish I was making. But I'm reading, and getting better, and the truth is, nobody except me is ever disappointed by my fresh bread (and I'm never disappointed by anyone else's fresh bread).

    After the bread: garlic mayonnaise (they should sell this stuff, just mayonnaise and diced fresh garlic and it's so good); some kind of slaw, which in my case was grated carrots, cucumber, daikon, and ginger marinated in rice vinegar and lime juice; and grilled chicken breast, marinated in (mostly) rice vinegar and soy sauce. I served with honeydew melon. There were sweet potatoes too, but we never touched them because the sandwiches were enough.

    The meat was almost unnecessary. The slaw ended up being really, really good. It was one of those concoctions where it didn't really taste like any of its ingredients. More than the sum.

    Overall, a successful experiment.

    EDIT: And lots and lots of cilantro.

  8. #28
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Kelron's Avatar
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    I tried the chicken liver in bolognese suggestion, unfortunately I let the sauce dry out too much so it didn't turn out great. Might try it again sometime, I'll make sure to chop the liver up much smaller because that texture really is horrible. Any suggestions on what to do with the rest of the liver, given that I don't like it much?

  9. #29
    Network Hub Dubbill's Avatar
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    I use this bolognese recipe. The milk takes some of the bitterness off the liver and helps to soften the meat.

    Last night I made lamp chops marinated in pomegranate molasses and harissa. The acidity of the molasses helps tenderise the lamb and creates a nice caramelisation when cooking. The harissa adds fire.
    Open-faced sandwiches are upon you whether you would risk it or not.

  10. #30
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    i usually just eat liver (moose and cattle only though) as either steaks (thin cuts, batter in flour and salt, grind a bit of black pepper on 'em in pan) and offered with fried onions and potatoes in some form, or in as ground liver in basic thick brown sauce with potatoes (boiled or mashed). If it's chicken liver i'd guess steaks are not an option but could you grind it or just mash them somehow?

    Then again i like liver.

    Fresh bread is never bad, it's pretty much an easy mode hack to make people think you're god in kitchen to make 1 or 2 good plates of good food and make a fresh bread. The one i made today was just total mess but it's still good tasting.

  11. #31
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    I've been working hard on my bread. I've finally got a baguette I'm delighted with. Still ugly looking, but tastes fantastic, as good as any I've ever had.

    These are the things I've learned (that are probably common knowledge):

    Always use bread flour. All-purpose flour is wonderful stuff, but for bread, it just doesn't work. Who'd have thunk.
    The slower the rise the better. I'm taking about 16 hours for my baguettes now, about 12 of them in the refrigerator, and it makes a huge difference. The bread tastes yeastier and fuller; the crumb is much softer.
    Add the salt at the end. I should have realized it earlier, but salt kills yeast. Salt adds a lot to the flavor, but it's fine added in late. I sprinkle maybe 0.25 tsp of large grain salt over my baguette (which is 2 cups of flour and 1 cup of water) just before cooking and it's plenty.
    Fold your dough gently when shaping it. I'm not talking about kneading it-- I'm talking post-rise. Treat it gently, but fold it a few times while shaping it. The goal is to get pockets of air in the middle of the loaf. More surface area is more deliciousness.

  12. #32
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    Tonight I did one of my favorite cheapies:

    !) Grill some chicken tenderloins. Cube them and season to taste.

    2) Cook some Penne, al dente.

    3) Heat some veggies (I usually use peas).

    4) mix everything together in a big bowl and lightly drizzle some high-end alfredo sauce. I'm sure a good cook would make their own, but I've been too lazy to try. I buy one from a local store that I really like.

    5) toss well.

    Enjoy a nice, quick, tasty dinner.

  13. #33
    Obscure Node JJevil's Avatar
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    I cooked myself a bag of Skittles and a Mountain Dew for dinner.

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