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  1. #1
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    Random PC Gaming/PC Related New Thread

    FlatOut dev's 'Next Car Game' earns $1 million via Early Access
    Flood of early purchasers make unfinished game a "huge success"
    Bugbear Entertainment's so-called 'Next Car Game' has netted the developer over $1 million in sales - before it has event been given a proper title.

    An early version of Next Car Game was made available via Steam's Early Access beta testing program and its own official website on January 16 for for Ł18.99 / €22.19 / $24.99.
    http://nextcargame.com/

  2. #2
    Network Hub bad guy's Avatar
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    that's just 1nsane

  3. #3
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Berzee's Avatar
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    I tried the weird sandbox prototype of this game at someone's house one time. It's been a long time since a physics simulation was hilarious to me, but this one was good, yes. Car Games seems like a weird genre for early access though (at least, one with less of a "be a part of the magnificent adventure of development" aspect) but maybe it's being funded more from the good old-fashioned (i.e. 2 years ago) motivation of "I just want it to exist some day".
    Support for my all-pepperjack-cheese food bank charity drive has been lukewarm at best.

  4. #4
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    It's amazing, because the Kickstarter IIRC never even got to $100,000.

    2,487
    backers
    $81,772
    pledged of $350,000 goal
    https://www.kickstarter.com/projects...attitude/posts

    I think it's a great job by BugBear.

    And I'm happy to say I supported their game :)

    Quote Originally Posted by Berzee View Post
    I tried the weird sandbox prototype of this game at someone's house one time. It's been a long time since a physics simulation was hilarious to me, but this one was good, yes. Car Games seems like a weird genre for early access though (at least, one with less of a "be a part of the magnificent adventure of development" aspect) but maybe it's being funded more from the good old-fashioned (i.e. 2 years ago) motivation of "I just want it to exist some day".
    I bought it for 2 reasons:

    1) the graphics were great

    2) BugBear makes incredibly amazing driving games and I wanted to see how good the gameplay was

    And I was absolutely impressed on both fronts! I would be happy to recommend this game to anyone who has any interest in games such as Twisted Metal, Destruction Derby (PS1), Flatout, or Stuntman.

    Or any interest at all in having cars to play with as toys, that's really what the fun comes from :)

    It's a great racing game, and a great game for a childhood love of cars, dirt, and crashing things. Any young boy's dream :D

  5. #5
    Lesser Hivemind Node icupnimpn2's Avatar
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    Early Access is a bit more concrete than supporting a Kickstarter. You at least get something now, whereas many Kickstarters are months or years from providing something playable (even as an alpha).

    The jumping on point is in a different spot, arguably closer to reality.

    Plus, the audience for Steam is larger than the audience for KS.

    Glad the devs did not take the KS failure as a sign of market disinterest.

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  7. #7
    Activated Node plat0nic's Avatar
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    why did that have so much more success than a kickstarter? because it was through steam?
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by plat0nic View Post
    why did that have so much more success than a kickstarter? because it was through steam?
    Propably combination of it being Steam vs. Kickstarter, and exposure on Youtube and such (i've noticed quite a few reasonably well known youtubers test it and really love it).

  9. #9
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus jnx's Avatar
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    Well the kickstarter might have fared a lot better if they had released the tech demo for everyone to try. It was promised to backers after the campaign. I'm very glad about this, Bugbear has made some amazing racing games (and I'm not even a racing fan) and this one will likely be their best work yet.
    Read more here (On hold) or on Twitter! Occasional impressions on random sim games.

  10. #10
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    An excellent article. Tom Bramwell keeps EG looking good while Leadbetter tries to dirty their output:

    Console developers need to look at Dungeon Keeper and learn
    Mobile gaming is a joke. Don't become the next punch-line.
    "We don't have a mobile gaming industry anymore. We have a mobile scamming industry."

    So said Thomas Baekdal in a column last week, swinging for the head of a nail with a strike so true that I found myself letting out an involuntary splutter of agreement.

    It wasn't so long ago that mobile gaming - and by extension tablet gaming - was the great white hope. Amidst the stagnation of traditional console and computer games, mobile was a hotbed of imagination and innovation where none of the usual rules applied.
    As the big old studios and publishers disintegrated, mobile allowed the smartest survivors to land on their feet and make the kind of games they and we really cared about.

    Nowadays it's a very different picture. There are a few people still doing good work on mobile (Simogo and the guy behind Blek are the first two that spring to mind), but the majority of smart indie developers have moved on to Steam or been signed up by Sony. They leave the mobile app stores to a new breed of business optimisers engaged in what increasingly feels like a pitiable race to the bottom. A few of these people are making a lot of money, but at what cost?

    The latest example of their output is Dungeon Keeper, which joins Electronic Arts' burgeoning shop of horrors. EA draws more attention than most when it tries this stuff because it uses cherished properties like Ultima to do so, and it should know better, but in many respects it's no worse than the likes of King and Zynga, who exist primarily to behave this way rather than just dabbling in it.

    Whenever you write about this phenomenon, the common complaint from people making the games in question is that not all of them are bad. As Thomas Baekdal realised though, the problem is definition. When your free-to-play game is all economy mechanics rather than game mechanics, when your game is all business design rather than game design, you're not actually making a game - you're constructing a scam, whether you realise it or not. If you're doing it knowingly, you're just a high-tech gangster.

    "It's extremely important that we continue to draw a big, unmissable line between the people running rackets and the people doing good work."
    So I agree: it's extremely important that we continue to draw a big, unmissable line between the people running rackets and the people doing good work. If we don't, the potential for long-term damage is huge. We've just about gotten to the point that legislators who grew up playing games can react sensibly to them in public life, for example. What about the generation that follows them, currently growing up playing stuff like Dungeon Keeper? They will arrive in office thinking games are made by the mob.

    This is timely because another group of people who will be thinking about it at the moment are console game developers. Faced with rising costs and haunted by the recent memory of so much turmoil at the end of the last generation, they are looking to business success in the free-to-play sector for inspiration to safeguard their futures.

    Inevitably, we're seeing a lot of missteps as they play catch-up. Games like Forza Motorsport 5 have come under fire for misjudgements that have called into question their creative integrity, reconfiguring themselves to slow players down unless they grind away at the same challenges repeatedly or invest additional real-world money. We have to hope that the games' developers, chastened by the response, take the right lessons from their experience. I think they probably will, because the majority have their hearts in the right place, although we will do our best to point out when they do not.

    ...

    The proliferation of games like Dungeon Keeper suggests it's too late for a lot of mobile developers, but the good work being done on PC points to another possible future. If I were busy building free-to-play ideas into a PlayStation 4 or Xbox One game, I know which side of the line I'd prefer to end up on. Reject the ways of the scammers. Be a game developer.


    Hit the link in the title for more.
    Last edited by rockman29; 08-02-2014 at 09:12 PM.

  11. #11
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus somini's Avatar
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    If only there was a way to play real games on the go...
    Oh wait, there are. The (3)DS(i) and the PSP/Vita didn't disappear down a black hole, the handhelds still exist and have a gigantic backlog of amazing games, real games, not F2P crap. If you want a time waster play Pokémon.
    I know everybody rails about having to carry around another device just to game, while using fucking tablets and 5" phones.
    I have absolutely no sympathy for smartphone "gamers", just like I don't have for Farmville players. If they keep eating the shit app publishers keep shoving down their throats, let them, I won't lose my sleep over it.
    /rant
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  12. #12
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    ^I agree 100%, I love my PS Vita :D

    Especially since together people carry tablet and phone, and together costing $700 hahaha :P

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  14. #14
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus DaftPunk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockman29 View Post
    ^I agree 100%, I love my PS Vita :D

    Especially since together people carry tablet and phone, and together costing $700 hahaha :P

    Like you people need to play games all the time,give them a rest once a whille jeez :D
    ... I take the lives of a few to protect the lives of many. I commit acts of war to preserve the greater peace. I take no joy in killing, but make no mistake; I'll do what needs to be done. Because it's my job. It's my duty. My name is Sam Fisher, and I am a Splinter Cell.

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