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  1. #2061
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus gundato's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The JG Man View Post
    Response in turn:

    1. Well, he was stabbed. Not in a manner that's usual, but then as you so rightly point out, that's part of the murder mystery genre. Also consider that he was obviously unconscious after his stabbing, possibly due to blood loss, possibly with some of the former causing him to hit his head on the frame of the area he was having a shower in. We have no idea how long he was in that condition for, merely that he didn't die. Also, Sherlock does specifically mention that he spent no further time on the case, presumably because he too was focused on the wedding.
    2. On the second time you look at him being stabbed, there is a pan to his face to show a reaction to something, but he obviously can't tell what. This is actually understandable given that a sharp enough object can pierce the skin without you noticing much, if at all. I'm sure you've felt a tingle of something, not known what it is only to then discover some time later that there's a cut mark or blood and you left wondering how on earth it happened. Same thing, just bigger. It's also possible, although never mentioned, that it was coated with some sort of chemical to numb the area, not unlike a local anaesthetic.
    3. Those belts are designed to be worn tightly, or were at least demonstrated to be so. So long as the pressure is there, almost anything can act as a means of stopping blood loss.
    1. I guess that is reasonable
    2. I would think it would be more than just a tingle, but I guess the guard is trained to not react and the numbing agent could work. Doesn't explain the Major though who is depicted as paranoid and would probably react to the "brushing"
    3. I am aware of that, but my understanding of binding a wound tightly is that you are trying to smush the edges of the wound together so no blood can escape. So if he were stabbed, then put on the belt, that would make sense as the larger wound is now compressed to a very small one. But he was stabbed while his tight belt was on, so wouldn't the binding do nothing to stop the bleeding? It would definitely make the wound a lot worse when unbound, but I don't understand how it would prevent blood loss while the belt was on.
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  2. #2062
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus The JG Man's Avatar
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    2. It's clear that, at least on the left-hand side of his body, he had been severely burned. It's not unreasonable to suppose that a lot of his nerves were badly damaged, if not destroyed, on that part of the body and a little bit here and there. Possibly more so than the guard, he may have felt absolutely nothing at all! His paranoia at that point would've been meaningless. Bare in mind that if someone was able to get close enough to put a blade in his belt, they'd have likely found out about any injuries and used that information to their advantage. He may not have needed any sort of anaesthesia. His paranoia also manifest it self as visible threats - he had his gun because he was expecting someone to come at him, to physically hold a knife/implement and kill him with it. If anything, after this his paranoia will probably increase to things he "can't see", making him even more of a recluse than before. Perhaps the less thought about the implications there the better.

    3. Essentially correct - it's to stop blood loss or as much as possible. I'm going to assume that it was a slow blood loss, an almost unnoticeable amount and we're given as much proof of this as possible with the guard scenario again. There was obviously some time between him taking off his belt and walking (which would've exacerbated the effect) and beginning to shower, which at some point will have made it difficult to tell if blood was dripping down him. The amount of blood lost to me didn't look like it would be Instant Death, just putting him in a critical condition, which would explain why one of the soldiers mistook him for dead because his heart beat was probably slowing down, especially whilst he was unconscious. Anyhow, the point I'm getting at is that all signs point to a 'slow' blood loss so that by the time you realise, it's too late.

    If we go back to the main case then, it's unlikely the wound would've been a super clean, surgical cut, so he was quite possibly bleeding all the time, simply releasing the belt would've let it all 'gush' out. The problem is that there isn't enough technical detail here to know, on either him or the guard in the test case. So whilst the murder would've taken place at the wedding, the death wouldn't have been until much later on (presumably when the festivities ended and he went back to his room to sleep). Anyhow, combine his badly damaged body and the fact he was probably continually losing a very slow amount of blood, it combines quite well to suggesting the belt as was would be fine to prevent immediate concerning blood loss.
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  3. #2063
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus gundato's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The JG Man View Post
    2. It's clear that, at least on the left-hand side of his body, he had been severely burned. It's not unreasonable to suppose that a lot of his nerves were badly damaged, if not destroyed, on that part of the body and a little bit here and there. Possibly more so than the guard, he may have felt absolutely nothing at all! His paranoia at that point would've been meaningless. Bare in mind that if someone was able to get close enough to put a blade in his belt, they'd have likely found out about any injuries and used that information to their advantage. He may not have needed any sort of anaesthesia. His paranoia also manifest it self as visible threats - he had his gun because he was expecting someone to come at him, to physically hold a knife/implement and kill him with it. If anything, after this his paranoia will probably increase to things he "can't see", making him even more of a recluse than before. Perhaps the less thought about the implications there the better.

    3. Essentially correct - it's to stop blood loss or as much as possible. I'm going to assume that it was a slow blood loss, an almost unnoticeable amount and we're given as much proof of this as possible with the guard scenario again. There was obviously some time between him taking off his belt and walking (which would've exacerbated the effect) and beginning to shower, which at some point will have made it difficult to tell if blood was dripping down him. The amount of blood lost to me didn't look like it would be Instant Death, just putting him in a critical condition, which would explain why one of the soldiers mistook him for dead because his heart beat was probably slowing down, especially whilst he was unconscious. Anyhow, the point I'm getting at is that all signs point to a 'slow' blood loss so that by the time you realise, it's too late.

    If we go back to the main case then, it's unlikely the wound would've been a super clean, surgical cut, so he was quite possibly bleeding all the time, simply releasing the belt would've let it all 'gush' out. The problem is that there isn't enough technical detail here to know, on either him or the guard in the test case. So whilst the murder would've taken place at the wedding, the death wouldn't have been until much later on (presumably when the festivities ended and he went back to his room to sleep). Anyhow, combine his badly damaged body and the fact he was probably continually losing a very slow amount of blood, it combines quite well to suggesting the belt as was would be fine to prevent immediate concerning blood loss.
    So it would be something like a very small stab wound that then gets torn open more/whatever when thee skin is uncompressed.

    I guess it is sort of possible, but still just seems insanely unlikely.
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  4. #2064
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus The JG Man's Avatar
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    I imagine something like that. The fact it is possible means that in the universe of Sherlock, it's absolutely 'likely'. Remember, it's Arthur Conan Doyle who penned the phrase: "When you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."
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  5. #2065
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Kelron's Avatar
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    Haven't been watching the series, but the Holmes of the books is really not as logical as he has a reputation for. He's right because he's written to be right, there's no alternative explanations for his convoluted deductions because Conan Doyle didn't write any, not because there aren't any other plausible solutions.

  6. #2066
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus gundato's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The JG Man View Post
    I imagine something like that. The fact it is possible means that in the universe of Sherlock, it's absolutely 'likely'. Remember, it's Arthur Conan Doyle who penned the phrase: "When you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."
    Yeah. I am generally willing to give a pretty big "Its Holmes, its cool" to things and it is pretty standard by murder mystery measures, but just something that is a bit bothering since it was a barrier to being able to "solve the case", which is still one of the best things about the show. When it is in proper murder mystery mode, every single clue is presented to the viewer and it is more about being able to piece things together than having the right set of specific knowledge.

    And, more importantly, I believe nothing deserves a perfect score. Err, except for any of my work, ALL of that is perfect and should never be checked for errors or flaws :p
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  7. #2067
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    As for me, it's been the eight season of Supernatural. I have actually used the last month watching the whole series from scratch, and as far as I know, ninth season is on-going at the moment so... yeah, I'm gonna start questioning the meaning of life as soon as I get to that point.

    Great show though, very addicting. It has its flaws, like characters who seem very important, being completely forgotten but hey, I like the little flaws.

  8. #2068
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    Quote Originally Posted by gundato View Post
    Yeah. I am generally willing to give a pretty big "Its Holmes, its cool" to things and it is pretty standard by murder mystery measures, but just something that is a bit bothering since it was a barrier to being able to "solve the case", which is still one of the best things about the show. When it is in proper murder mystery mode, every single clue is presented to the viewer and it is more about being able to piece things together than having the right set of specific knowledge.

    And, more importantly, I believe nothing deserves a perfect score. Err, except for any of my work, ALL of that is perfect and should never be checked for errors or flaws :p
    Yeah, I think with mysteries like that there's a very fine balance between 'oh, I figured something out' feeling clever, and a sense of 'oh, things work like that??' education where you learn something that it just sort of.. I wouldn't say missed, but certainly glanced off of. It was a great episode, but it strained a bit there.

  9. #2069
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    Re the Sherlock mystery:
    I had assumed up until the point you actually heard the blade go in and out, that the blade had stayed in, with the leather belt gripping it at the sides to ensure it didn't come back out, until the belt came off. That I found vaguely plausible, the actual explanation on the show less so (though I doubt either is legit).

  10. #2070
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus squirrel's Avatar
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    The latest episode of Doomsday Preppers by National Geographic (actually I think it's an outsourced production if my information is correct) is somewhat inspiring. Most episodes of the series showed preppers who spent most of their efforts to arm like militias, as if being armed is all that prepping is about. This episode, however, has a prepper clan who, in the fear of a cyberattack would paralyze the IT infrastructure the USA being too dependent on, leading to a collapse of the society they are in. This clan is working on preparing to rebuild the education system in the possible post-cyber era. One task is to build up their own library of printed books for obvious reason, that digitized library resources the society has accumulated all those years might suddenly become inaccessible one day while Americans no longer have control over their hacked IT system.

    I think there is absolute no danger printed books would be extinct. It's just that market share of printed books in the whole publishing industry shrink, but the whole book market is expanding rapidly thanks to ebooks. Really, many of my friends who haven't been reading often start reading ebooks because of the convenience. They can scoll through their smartphones' screen to read with ease in condensed area like subways. But then yes, storing printed books would be essential in preserving civilization, as there is still no digital storage being satisfactorily reliable.

  11. #2071
    Lesser Hivemind Node Bobtree's Avatar
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    National Geographic: Guns, Germs and Steel was engaging and interesting and well presented. I haven't read the book but was familiar with the premise and some of the reactions and controversy.

    Call the Midwife was better than I expected. There's some fluff and drama, but it's also moving and serious and heartfelt at times.

    The Walking Dead
    season 3 has major problems with suspension of disbelief.

    Downton Abbey season 4's opening episode didn't do much for me. The show really can't live up to it's first season and has been going downhill since then. Season 2 was ok, but 3 was mostly stupid and soapy, and only Bates held it together for me.

    Bletchley Circle was not quite good. Telling us the characters are smart does not make them smart.

    Attack on Titan is hugely overrated. I just marathoned it but didn't enjoy much. It has clumsy writing, heavy repetition, awful pacing, lazy animation, too many monologues and flashbacks and over-the-top reactions, and seriously needs better editing overall. So little of the setup is resolved that I think I will just skim plot summaries for the spoilers and skip future installments.

  12. #2072
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus SirKicksalot's Avatar
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    Helix: shit characters, lazy writing, boring all-around. The Arctic setting is the only good thing about it.

    Banshee: best show on TV right now.

  13. #2073
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus The JG Man's Avatar
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    Helix is the new Ron Moore thing, right?

    So there's a cinema in London called The Princes Charles and last night (through to this morning) they were doing a marathon of the first season of Veronica Mars and I have to say, I enjoyed about 97% of it (the other 3% being the parts of teen-drama I couldn't really warm up to). It's a fun show with a neat premise that also happens to be incredibly dated, an astonishing feat being only a decade old; the stand-out point about how great wi-fi was had the whole cinema laughing. Anyhow, I hadn't seen it before so other than a rough idea of what to expect, I was definitely impressed. I'll be needing to look into the other seasons now.
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  14. #2074
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Jesus_Phish's Avatar
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    Veronica Mars used to be on day time back when I was between college and jobs in one of those weird time slots that wasn't taken up by Jeremy Kyle or his peers. I never actively followed it, but it always seemed interesting enough whenever I did tune in.
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  15. #2075
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    I recently watched both seasons of Black Mirror. Each episode really needs its own review and I can't be bothered with that, but suffice to say I felt all six episodes were worthwhile, if unsettling, viewing. My summation: "six cautionary tales of the near future."

    I think 'Fifteen Million Merits' was originally two episodes cut down. It runs fifteen minutes longer than the others and yet there are a lot of loose ends. I thought it was the most powerful of the six episodes, although it seems to have attracted more negative comments than most on account of its stylistic departure from the first episode, 'The National Anthem'. I felt the fourth episode, 'Be Right Back', was the weakest.
    Last edited by Lethe; 12-01-2014 at 04:53 PM.

  16. #2076
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus sabrage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lethe View Post
    I think 'Fifteen Million Merits' was originally two episodes cut down. It runs fifteen minutes longer than the others and yet there are a lot of loose ends. I thought it was the most powerful of the six episodes, although it seems to have attracted more negative comments than most on account of its stylistic departure from the first episode, 'The National Anthem'. I felt the fourth episode, 'Be Right Back', was the weakest.
    "Be Right Back" deeply unsettled me, and "The Entire History of You" made me well up a few times. "White Bear" was bad enough I never even got around to the third series 2 episode. The others I could take or leave.

  17. #2077
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Xercies's Avatar
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    Ok Well Sherlock was really really good and showed that the other two were really weak in plotting since this was political thriller like mystery with a really intriguing and interesting villian(something which makes me kind of sad that SPOILERS he died at the end and there bringing back Moriarty). Interested to see where they go with it because apart from this episode I do have to say this has been the weakest season and the writers will have to up there game when it comes to plot since they have the characters down really good.

    I think 'Fifteen Million Merits' was originally two episodes cut down. It runs fifteen minutes longer than the others and yet there are a lot of loose ends


    Hmm I don't think it would of worked with two episodes I feel it was powerful how it was.

  18. #2078
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus gundato's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xercies View Post
    Ok Well Sherlock was really really good and showed that the other two were really weak in plotting since this was political thriller like mystery with a really intriguing and interesting villian(something which makes me kind of sad that SPOILERS he died at the end and there bringing back Moriarty). Interested to see where they go with it because apart from this episode I do have to say this has been the weakest season and the writers will have to up there game when it comes to plot since they have the characters down really good.



    Hmm I don't think it would of worked with two episodes I feel it was powerful how it was.[/COLOR]
    Yeah, I will definitely agree that the first two episodes of the season were weak from a plot standpoint but both were incredibly entertaining

    This was a really good plot AND was really entertaining. Very good at riding the rollercoaster of Feels.

    Also, the Sherlock Scan when Sherlock is shot by Mary was quite possibly my favorite scene in any Sherlock media. It manages to be tense, heartbreaking, heartwarming, and just all shades of awesome at the same time. And the picture it paints of Sherlock's mind is even better.

    I saw the headshot coming from a mile away (The very heavy referencing of Mind Palaces the entire season combined with them trying to recover evidence), but definitely did not see the ending. Which still has me squealing. Because while it has every chance of being a "Jumping the shark" moment, I am confident they can make it work (and I am not convinced it isn't Sherlock behind it...)
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  19. #2079
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabrage View Post
    "Be Right Back" deeply unsettled me, and "The Entire History of You" made me well up a few times. "White Bear" was bad enough I never even got around to the third series 2 episode. The others I could take or leave.
    I thought 'White Bear' was thematically very powerful in looking at the notion of 'an eye for an eye' punishment and our capacity to derive enjoyment from the suffering of others (a recurring theme for the series) and also the rise of for-profit prisons. I know 'The Entire History of You' has been optioned for a film, but I felt that episode discharged its premise just about perfectly (although hardly exhausting the potential of the technology whose other implications e.g. use by the surveillance state, were barely touched upon) and it's 'White Bear' that I'd most like to see done on a bigger budget.

    The last episode, 'Waldo's Moment', about the subversion of a local election by a swearing CGI puppet, doesn't seem to have too many fans. It's definitely not the best episode, but I think the reaction is partly down to its uncomfortable message. The current system and the people in it may be terrible, the episode says (and doesn't pull any punches in that regard), but this -- an extrapolation of the trend towards politics as reality TV, i.e. entertainment -- is worse.

    Regarding 'Be Right Back', I felt it jumped the shark when the android entered the scene. It occurs to me that 'BRB' and 'The Entire History of You' (the two episodes you mentioned) focus on the interpersonal consequences of technology whereas the other four episodes operate on a broader societal level.
    Last edited by Lethe; 13-01-2014 at 04:32 AM.

  20. #2080
    Sherlock. I'm not sure how I feel about bringing Moriarty back. That is, if it's actually the case. Overall, while the season did have some great moments (and new characters), I'm afraid the series might be going downhill and not just because of this. We'll have to wait and see, I guess. Just two years...
    Last edited by wrestledwithgod; 13-01-2014 at 04:41 AM.

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