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  1. #1
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus mashakos's Avatar
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    Submerged Liquid Cooling

    This is just beautiful:
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_X_hgtlJpA

    This is possible using the 3M Novec 7000, a non-conductive liquid with a boiling point of 34C.
    The above example uses absolutely no fans, so the only sound would probably come from the slight bubbling/boiling. Steampunk PC is here!
    An engineer combined the liquid solution seen above with a radiator (no pump), allowing for high overclocks:



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUCTEFaunZc

    here's the guy's website:
    http://www.vaporphaze.com/
    Last edited by mashakos; 01-02-2013 at 11:27 AM.
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  2. #2
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    Why is he wearing a coat and hat indoors? Needs less cooling?? :)

    Liquid cooling PCs scares me - it's a massively silly idea and that is just bonkers...

    Could you keep fish in it too? :)

  3. #3
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus mashakos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trjp View Post
    Why is he wearing a coat and hat indoors? Needs less cooling?? :)

    Liquid cooling PCs scares me - it's a massively silly idea and that is just bonkers...

    Could you keep fish in it too? :)
    here's a blade server solution for ya:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3gCavl2Y6U

    what are you, a village IT guy? Scared of everything! lol

    EDIT: BTW, 3M Novec 7000 is not H20...
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  4. #4
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    Quick Google brings up some interestingly deep technical arguments about this - such as this one

    http://www.overclock.net/t/1209583/3m-novec-7000-group

    Cooling servers this way is daft because you need a LOT of liquid to cool relatively little of the internal area of the server - and servers don't actually run that hot (it's more the heat they dissipate which is the issue, whether that being in the form of pressurised gas/liquid is better is arguable I guess?)

    For the mentalists who want to run 4 copies of Furmark 'near silently' tho, it seems ideal :)

    That said - I'm not sure saying that it doesn't corrode stuff in 48 hours is a great test - more like 2 years maybe!?

    There also talk of the bubbles in the liquid pushing components away from the board - they talk about 'cheap boards' but I guess the designer wasn't planning on them being used by Captain Nemo :)

  5. #5
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus mashakos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trjp View Post
    Cooling servers this way is daft because you need a LOT of liquid to cool relatively little of the internal area of the server
    actually, this method expends massive amounts of heat in very small areas (500w per litre as I recall), so it's actually the opposite of what you state :P
    the problem with implementing it with current server hardware is that most server motherboards are E-ATX or greater in size which necessitates a large volume of liquid to cover the entire surface area of the components. At $300 a gallon it's not a cheap solution.

    as for bubbles pushing components (??) just use a horizontal rack setup rather than go vertical. Simple.
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  6. #6
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Heliocentric's Avatar
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    Ah, mashakos, don't go changing.
    I'm failing to writing a blog, specifically about playing games the wrong way
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  7. #7
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus alms's Avatar
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    I look forward to it dropping in price so I can cool my feet down in it during hot summer nights.
    Looking for you daily bundle fix? Join us on The onward march of bundles
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  8. #8
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    That's pretty cool.
    I can think of several reasons why it's probably not a great way of going about cooling your PC though.

  9. #9
    Network Hub Ernesto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mashakos View Post
    actually, this method expends massive amounts of heat in very small areas (500w per litre as I recall), so it's actually the opposite of what you state :P
    That's not what trjp meant, I think. You would have to submerge the whole pcb to cool down a very little area on it. Therefore you need a lot of liquid.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by CMaster View Post
    That's pretty cool.
    I can think of several reasons why it's probably not a great way of going about cooling your PC though.
    As per the above comment - mainly because the heat dissapation from a PC comes from 2 main TINY areas, so sticking the whole PC in fluid is bloody daft :)

    I tend to think liquid cooling of all sorts is a bit bonkers tbh - it just seems like a step-too-far but this one has to have a stack of downsides other than just cost...

  11. #11
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trjp View Post
    As per the above comment - mainly because the heat dissapation from a PC comes from 2 main TINY areas, so sticking the whole PC in fluid is bloody daft :)
    Gets rid of the whole worry about leaks though, and no pipes or radiators or pumps to muck around with. Quiet(er) too.

    Still, it has its drawbacks. Plus stuff's going to be using less and less wattage, so there'll be less and less focus on fancy new cooling methods, aside from server farms and awesome casemods.

  12. #12
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Heliocentric's Avatar
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    How do they cool things in space? By what method do they "vent" heat? Cold cathodes i suppose.
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  13. #13
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heliocentric View Post
    How do they cool things in space? By what method do they "vent" heat? Cold cathodes i suppose.
    Well, they don't use overclocked AMD processors, let's put it that way. You only have one kind of cooling that works in a vacuum, so you basically just have to use the spacecraft as a heatsink and then manage how heat is radiated and how light is absorbed (put a mirror between the Sun and the spacecraft = way less heat to worry about).

  14. #14
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Heliocentric's Avatar
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    Not strictly true, a cold cathode is a lightbulb the absorbs heat from its environment and uses the energy to transmit light, hence my suggestion.
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  15. #15
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    A cold cathode draws current which generates heat.

  16. #16
    Network Hub Ernesto's Avatar
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    The only way to get rid of heat in a vacuum is to radiate it. You can actively cool a part of a satellite but then you would only shift the heat to another place and heat the whole system even more. That's why heat pipes are popular in satellite building. They don't need a power supply and therefore don't add to the heat.
    Hmm... slightly OT, except you want a gaming rig in orbit ;)

  17. #17
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Heliocentric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ernesto View Post
    slightly OT, except you want a gaming rig in orbit ;)
    I was reading/considering about methodologies for a hobbyist probe (launching using an em rail from a weather balloon etc), but even low emission CPU's would cook out the entire system eventually, it was one of the few logical issues that was hard to solve.
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  18. #18
    Network Hub Ernesto's Avatar
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    Well, heat is only one of your problems. Radiation is pretty nasty too. Random bit flips have bad effect on system stability. Although in a low earth orbit and short term missions this might not be critical.
    How about a RaspberryPI? Small, light, low power consumption, GHz-class.
    Anyway, have fun with your project :D

  19. #19
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Heliocentric's Avatar
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    As pre built and robust hardware goes smart phones tech does seem like a good jumping off point. In pure nasa style costs must be minimised :p.
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  20. #20
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus mashakos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ernesto View Post
    That's not what trjp meant, I think. You would have to submerge the whole pcb to cool down a very little area on it. Therefore you need a lot of liquid.
    I know what he meant and I answered pretty clearly, at least as clearly as I could.

    Current hardware, very big EATX motherboards.
    Solution: use very tiny ITX motherboards for servers. Needs less of the expensive liquid.
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