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  1. #21
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Boris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sakkura View Post
    Backing up important information is necessary regardless of the type of storage. HDDs do fail. And I've experienced more HDD failures than SSD failures, that's for sure.
    You've probably had more HDD's than SSD's.

    But yeah, backups backups backups.

  2. #22
    As someone who has built and serviced thousands of PCs, as well as worked at a company that makes NAND that goes into SSDs... anyone that's buying a hdd because they think it's going to be more reliable. . . is doing it wrong.

    There have been some overhyped high failure rate drives (OCZ + Sandforce), but overall, modern SSDs are more reliable than HDDs. In a laptop it's much more so. A mechanical hard drive is by far the most likely component to fail in a laptop, because those delicate moving parts *really* don't like to be dropped.

    If you're worried about NAND endurance, a modern 128GB SSD with MLC NAND (most of them these days) will last about 35 years when writing 10GB per day. If you torrent really a lot and write 20GB per day, cut that in half to 17 years. See Anandtech for more details.

    That said, there is a common bit of logic that applies to all new parts: If you're concerned with reliability, wait until it's been out for a few months so that any potential reliability issues will show up. Brand new complex things always have unanticipated issues. It's unavoidable with cost-competitive consumer products.

    tldr; modern ssds are more reliable than hdds. Particularly Intel, Samsung, and Micron.

  3. #23
    Secondary Hivemind Nexus Sakkura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Logical Increments View Post
    tldr; modern ssds are more reliable than hdds. Particularly Intel, Samsung, and Micron.
    Consumer info: Micron sell many of their SSDs (and much of their memory) under the Crucial brand.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Logical Increments View Post
    As someone who has built and serviced thousands of PCs, as well as worked at a company that makes NAND that goes into SSDs... anyone that's buying a hdd because they think it's going to be more reliable. . . is doing it wrong.

    There have been some overhyped high failure rate drives (OCZ + Sandforce), but overall, modern SSDs are more reliable than HDDs. In a laptop it's much more so. A mechanical hard drive is by far the most likely component to fail in a laptop, because those delicate moving parts *really* don't like to be dropped.

    If you're worried about NAND endurance, a modern 128GB SSD with MLC NAND (most of them these days) will last about 35 years when writing 10GB per day. If you torrent really a lot and write 20GB per day, cut that in half to 17 years. See Anandtech for more details.

    That said, there is a common bit of logic that applies to all new parts: If you're concerned with reliability, wait until it's been out for a few months so that any potential reliability issues will show up. Brand new complex things always have unanticipated issues. It's unavoidable with cost-competitive consumer products.

    tldr; modern ssds are more reliable than hdds. Particularly Intel, Samsung, and Micron.
    ... and, to add to this, I have half a mind to speculate that a lot of the problems people have had with SSDs are related to the fact that most of the early ones didn't like being turned off abruptly. I've lost at least a couple of drives to SSDs losing power when they're not supposed to.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sic View Post
    ... and, to add to this, I have half a mind to speculate that a lot of the problems people have had with SSDs are related to the fact that most of the early ones didn't like being turned off abruptly. I've lost at least a couple of drives to SSDs losing power when they're not supposed to.
    That isn't really an excuse is it? Sometimes a desktop or even a laptop will lose power without warning, the hardware needs to be able to cope with that 999 times out of a 1000.

    I just spent a day shoehorning an SSD into someone's laptop and they've now seen the result, read about SSDs (I didn't suggest that bit) and tomorrow I will therefore spend the same time replacing the SSD with an HDD!!

    The laptop isn't anything special (2 year old Dell 1545) but it was SLOWWWWW and a look at the SMART stats on the HDD suggested they were bolloxed (4441 power-on days -44trillion CRC errors!?) so I reckoned it was the HDD that was dying (and Seatools agreed). I didn't have another HDD handy but I did have a Sandisk Ultra 120Gb SSD and so I said I'd clone their HDD over to that, which worked brilliantly (cloned and aligned with Partition Expert in no time - booted first time!).

    Tested it with a few benchmarks, speed is decent and definately SATA2 (the old HDD was just SATA), powered-up in about 8 seconds (before it was almost a minute!!) and much nippier overall.

    They saw this and said "but it's going to fail isn't it"? I pointed-out that their HDD was less than 2 years old and it was knackered but they ummmed and ahhhed and when they realised the SSD owned them a bit more than a new HDD they decided against it - so I've now ordered a boring 320Gb SATA2 HDD for them and tomorrow I do the same shit again...

    So, that Sandisk Ultra is spare for my shiny new (to me - old to everyone else) X200 then - yummy :)
    Last edited by trjp; 19-02-2013 at 09:03 PM.

  6. #26
    A good SSD is the single biggest upgrade I've made in years. The difference in overall system responsiveness is huge. (Well, actually fairly small, measured in seconds - but it feels big!)

    Using a computer with a plain old HDD now feels like using 56K dial-up.

    And thanks Sakkura - you're right, Crucial brands and sells Micron's consumer SSDs and RAM.

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