Posts Tagged ‘7 day FPS’

Bang! 7 Day FPS Game Jam Now On

By Alice O'Connor on November 10th, 2014.

Fitting, I saw The Raveonettes on Friday. Bang!

The first Seven Day First-Person Shooter Challenge in 2012 brought us games including Receiver, an obsession with the clicky mechanical bits of guns that made me realise that, required to use a pistol, I probably would just leave a trail of accidentally-ejected magazines. One of the game jam’s stars in 2013 was Superhot, a stylish dance of positioning and movement. Interesting things can happen when folks dedicate a week to focusing on an unusual idea in a small shooty-bang game. This year’s 7DFPS kicked off on Saturday and things are in full swing. Already I’ve seen one of the most wonderful and horrible parody FPSs ever. Look at this terrible thing:

Read the rest of this entry »

, .

14 Comments »

SUPERHOT Is On Kickstarter, Still Stylish But More Beautiful

By Graham Smith on May 14th, 2014.

SUPER. HOT. Getting the idea?

And all at once, the internet tweeted. SUPERHOT, the first-person shooter in which time moves only when you do, is now on Kickstarter. The original prototype caused a stir last year by turning combat into a puzzle in which you had to move efficiently to conserve time, dodge bullets and take out your enemies, and by presenting each of its short scenarios with precision and style.

You can still play that original prototype if you missed what the fuss was about. You can back the Kickstarter project right now, where $14 will net you the final game and they’re looking for a total of $100,000. Or you can step below to watch the new trailer and discover exactly how the team has been advancing through time these past eight months.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

16 Comments »

A People’s History Of The FPS, Part 1: The WAD

By Robert Yang on September 19th, 2012.


“A People’s History” is a three part essay series by Robert Yang. He told us that he wanted to write an alternate view of the traditionally accepted history of the FPS genre as entirely dominated and driven by the mainstream, commercial industry, and to “argue for a long-standing but suppressed tradition of non-industry involvement in the first-person genre”. This is part one.

In 1994, the New York Times filed a review of a first-person game under its “Arts” section, proclaiming it to be “a game that weaves together image, sound and narrative into a new form of experience.” It sold millions of copies and inspired dozens of imitators. It seemed poised to define an era.

That game was Myst and it failed to define an era. Instead, a game called Doom came out three months after Myst — and then it shot Myst in the face.
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , .

114 Comments »

Impressions: Wolfire’s Hyper-Realistic Gun Sim, Receiver

By Nathan Grayson on June 20th, 2012.

Ah! I pressed this thing, and then this other thing came out, and it's full of other other things!
I went to a firing range once. Now, don’t get the wrong idea: I had no pretensions of “Oh, I’ve played first-person shooters, so this will be a bullet-casing-encrusted cakewalk.” I was not able to pre-fathom, however, just how truly terrible I’d be. Even the simple act of loading rounds into my borrowed 9mm pistol’s magazine was – at least, at first – an awkward, embarrassing battle of man vs incredibly simple machine. And, of course, I made all the rookie mistakes: I forgot to turn the safety off, my aim kept getting shaken up by recoil that wouldn’t rattle a baby, etc. All the while, I couldn’t help but wonder: “How do people who are actually good at this do it?” This wasn’t helped by the couple standing in the stall next to me, gleefully unloading a gigantic automatic rifle.

Receiver – Wolfire’s every-aspect-of-a-gun simulating entry in the recent 7DFPS challenge – reminded me all-too-painfully of that day. But, you know, in a mostly good way. And with a twist: I had to bring my horrific lack of firearm know-how, abysmal aim, and woefully non-bulletproof body into an environment full of things that definitely knew what they were doing.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

58 Comments »