Posts Tagged ‘Fortnite’

People Can Fly Flies Again, Still Owns Bulletstorm

a person who can fly top right, albeit unwillingly

Polish studio People Can Fly made well-received OTT shooters Painkiller and Bulletstorm, then they got bought by Epic and became Epic Games Poland, and now suddenly they’re independent and are People Can Fly again. I’m genuinely distressed that they didn’t take the opportunity to name themselves People Can Fly Again. No cast-iron reason has been given for the regained independence and there is, as yet, no sign of conflict, but the official line is that it’s “to reflect the team’s desire to create their own games.” PCF confirm to us that they retain the rights to Bulletstorm, but sadly there’s no talk of a sequel as yet.
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Epic Look At Fortnite’s Buildings, Bullets, And Btraps

Seriously, Alice - 'btraps'? YES SERIOUSLY.

The Unreal dudes at Epic started showing off a lot more of their build-o-craft-me-shoot-a-zombie ‘em up Fortnite [official site] while my head was turned. They’ve got members of the gang on livestreams to chat about specific features then show ‘em off, so far covering building, weapons, and traps. That’s most of the core of a sandbox game about building bases and killing monsters.

But is it different enough from the squillion other crafty monster mashes to catch your eye? I don’t know: it’s your eye. How do I know what your eyes see? It’s not like I plopped one of your eyes out and swapped in one of mine. Haha how would I do that? I don’t even know what a spoon is.

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Zone Of The Defenders: Fortnite

As I was watching the latest Fortnite video to emerge from the artist formerly known as Epic MegaGames, a voice at the back of my brainbox suggested that the developer talkthrough reminded me of something I read yesterday. Could it have been the fifth chapter of ill-advised The Shining sequel, Doctor Sleep? Nope. We could argue that psychic vampiric traveller clan the True Knot are a metaphor for gamers, with their need for ‘the good Steam’, but that’s a stretch. Maybe it was an article about Lego Architecture Studio? Nah. That’s a different kind of construction entirely.

Aha! It was John’s draconian and violently enforced rules for games. The video, you see, is like watching a tutorial for a game I’ve already played.

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How Epic Hopes To Avoid Pay-To-Win With Fortnite

Fortnite is, technically speaking, Epic’s first free-to-play game. The crayola colored smash-and-shoot-and-loot-and-build-er is being designed primarily as a co-op thing, but with persistent MMO-style progression underlying it all. There’s also still-nascent PVP in the works, further necessitating balance in the name of fair fun. Fortnite is, however, a giant mixed bag of moving parts, multiple genres (action, building, crafting, a Gears-of-War-style horde mode, etc) mashed together. How do you make all of that free-to-play without mucking it up?

I asked producer Roger Collum about Epic’s plans, influences from games like League of Legends and Team Fortress 2, the potential emergence of a tedious grind with things like XP boosters in the mix, whether or not you can really equate time and money as free-to-play devs so often do, and more. It’s all below.

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Fortnite To Be Online-Only, Will Have Mods… Somehow

Quick recap: once upon a time Epic’s Fortnite was set to be kinda grimdark and more than likely a premium game (i.e. money upfront, party in the back). Over the course of a couple radio silent years and some fairly large revisions, however, it’s emerged more lighthearted and – rather crucially – free to play. It is, then (as is usually the case with these things), an online-only affair, an action/building game built for co-op and PVP, but not really single-player. Also it’ll have MMO-style persistent progression. So Epic will run the servers and sell (largely) cosmetic items. Problem: where do mods enter that picture? The answer, per producer Roger Collum: somewhere, somehow, someday. But “definitely.”

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Video Preview: Epic’s Fortnite Is… Interesting, Early

For the past many years, Epic was known as the One True King of console grimdark. Gears of War was about colossal mountain men with veins running rivulets through their stone hewn necks and stubble-dappled chins, their rage matched only by their apocalyptic sorrow and love of running in slow motion to popular songs that described their situation eerily well. But now we have, well, pretty much the opposite. Fortnite is bright, silly, and PC-only. It’s also basically Gears of War’s ever-popular horde mode plus Minecraft, Left 4 Dead, and a bunch of its own ingredients. It’s certainly unique, but I don’t think it’s great. Yet. Watch below to hear my impressions after a full day of playing a pre-alpha build.

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Epic’s Fortnite Goes Free-To-Play, Alpha Sign-Ups Open


As Epic told me during GDC, sugar-cereal-colored buildy blaster Fortnite isn’t fourscore feet under, as a) that’d be total overkill and b) it’s doing just fine. After a lengthy period of radio silence, the Unreal Engine mega-maven has finally seen fit to re-reveal the game and begin taking sign-ups for an upcoming alpha. The biggest (noticeable) change so far? Fortnite is now officially free-to-play.

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Epic: Fortnite Has ‘Evolved,’ UE4 Inspired By Minecraft

Before GDC, Epic’s ubiquitous Unreal Engine was a walled garden. But that all changed when company president Johnny Epic waded into the conference crowd while bellowing, “You get an Unreal Engine and YOU get an Unreal Engine” to everyone in attendance. And then he chainsawed a life-size replica of traditional gaming industry business models in half. Or at least, that’s how I like to imagine it happened. I was asleep while John took the bullet of waking up at Ungodly O’ Clock to attend Epic’s presser. The takeaway, however, was obvious: Epic is trying to make its engine more accessible to everyone – full-time developers, part-time indies, and no-time hobbyists alike. I asked Epic engine GM Ray Davis how the studio plans to achieve that (hint: Minecraft) and also about where Fortnite‘s gone because I pretty much had to.

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Epic’s Fortnite Still Exists, Now At Bulletstorm Dev

Do you see it? Behind that box. That stare bear is doing the stare bear stare, which is like a normal stare only bear stare bear stare stare bear bear bear stare stare bear stare

It has been far, far longer than a fortnight since we last heard even the slightest peep about Epic’s Fortnite. Many fortnights, in fact – enough to bridge the gap between last year’s PAX Prime and this very day. During that span, renowned puppy eater and fearless chainsaw-gun entrepreneur Cliff Bleszinski departed the studio for somehow greener pastures and also another Gears of War game came out or something I guess. The latter, however, was developed by Bulletstorm developer People Can Fly, who now happens to be on – you guessed it – Fornite. Also, they’ve been rechristened Epic Games Poland, a distinctly less optimistic (yet far more factually accurate) name, if you ask me.

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Fortnite: PC ‘First And Foremost,’ Launching As Beta

Generally speaking, Epic’s a company that likes to put its best foot forward. When it debuts a new game or engine, everything’s polished to a gloriously gritty sheen – even if a look behind the curtain tells an entirely different tale. So Fortnite‘s PAX presentation was – for many reasons – a strong reminder that the crayola-colored survivor is Different. It began, for instance, with Tanya Jessen, Cliff Bleszinski, and co running us through very early Unreal Engine 3 prototypes of Fortnite’s combat – complete with desolate checker box backgrounds and near-superheroic levels of Aliasing-O-Vision. But that’s the point: Epic considers its construction-centric opus a “living project,” and it wants fans in on the ground floor.

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