Posts Tagged ‘Boiling-Point’

The Longest Day: 24 Hours In White Gold

By Quintin Smith on February 17th, 2011.

White Gold: War In Paradise, aka Xenus 2, aka Boiling Point 2 is the free-roaming FPS-RPG we’ve been meaning to take a closer look at for ages. A sequel to the famously mad, broken and ambitious Boiling Point (of which even the patch notes are comedy gold) from original Kiev-based developers Deep Shadows! What could be more exciting? What, indeed. An account of my first in-game day follows. It is a tale of daring-do, heavy drinking, a snake, a beautiful car and an enema.
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White Gold: Nonsense Gaming At Its Finest

By Alec Meer on September 25th, 2008.

I do like cars.
Here’s a new video for the sequel to the infamous Boiling Point. The video’s in Russian, but still does an excellent job of demonstrating the a) ambition and b) madness of Deep Shadows’ open-world FPS. Why does he shoot that fisherman? Why does that man on the roof explode? Why does he keep slicing people in the back of the neck rather than the front? White Gold will, I suspect, turn out to be comedy anecdote-central.
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PCG: White Gold Preview

By Kieron Gillen on June 26th, 2008.

The Cuba-style cars are cute. Man, functional caption. I must be drunk.
I suspect I may have missed this one if RPG watch hadn’t noticed C&VG had republished my PC Gamer preview of White Gold online. White Gold is basically, Boiling Point 2. You’ll remember Boiling Point for being a bit buggy on release. Now, looking at the comments thread, they hit an interesting point. That I went on about Boiling Point having a load of bugs. Blimey.
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The Precursors: A Challenge

By John Walker on April 16th, 2008.

My challenge to you. Watch the video of Deep Shadows‘ (they behind Boiling Point and White Gold) latest, The Precursors below the click-o-link and as quickly as possible shout out which genre you think it’s going to be. You get three guesses. (No cheating by looking at Jim’s previous comments). Meanwhile, here are two images that won’t help.

A first-person shooter?

A space combat sim?

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Fixed: Size Of The Moon

By Jim Rossignol on December 18th, 2007.

I’ve been meaning to write about this for a while, because it just tickles me pink. If you were paying attention to PC gaming in 2005 then you’ll probably remember Deep Shadows’ spectacularly open-ended FPS, Boiling Point. It remains one of my favourite games of all time, partly because it was an astonishingly ambitious game of the kind I can’t seem to get enough of, and partly because it it was an accidental surrealist masterpiece of outlandish bugs and terrible production. Few games were as weirdly broken as Boiling Point, and there were plenty of commentators who came away with wry smiles and unhappy brains as a result.
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Graphicsability High. What about Gameplayability?

By Kieron Gillen on August 20th, 2007.

While you may not realise it from reading this blog, there are other PC shooters other than Bioshock we give a damn about. No, really.

This angle is going to be terribly impractical to play from, frankly.

Firstly, Eurogamer head off to Germany to actually speak at length to the Crytek guys about their forthcoming Crysis, including getting hands on with the multiplayer section (Deathmatch sounds much as you’d expect, but the Power Struggle seems an interesting cross between a territory-control and base-capture game). Also, predictably, the multiplayer doesn’t look as impressive as the single player graphically. Bally Electric Internet not keeping speed with our DX10 explosions.

While Crysis is the one everyone will be excited about post-Bioshock, I’m personally keeping an eye on White Gold, which PC gamer have lobbed up a short preview of online. You may not be aware of it. It’s basically the sequel to Boiling Point, the most critically divisive game of last year. You may remember that Games TM gave it 9 and Edge gave it 2. Meanwhile, me, being a smart-arse, came close to literally giving it both. Enormously ambitious and enormously bugged in about equal measures, the real question with White Gold is whether developers Deep Shadow will somehow manage to keep it under control.

When I had it demoed to me, they stressed they’d learned a lot and all that but… well, White Gold isn’t their only game. They’re also working on Precursors, which is basically Boiling Point… in space. While White Gold is a natural step on from Boiling Point – including Giant Spiders, which will gain extra points from me – Precursors lobs a load of influences from things like Freelancer in there too – space missions, flying between planets, whatever.

So rather than, after Boiling Point, concentrating their efforts… they make TWO ambitious games. Sharing a lot of technology, admitedly, but still. You salute them and fear for them in about equal measures.

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The Joy Of Bugs

By John Walker on August 15th, 2007.

Inspired by Professional Circumstances, I’ve been playing Just Cause for the last couple of days, and it’s got me thinking about the play-off between freedom and bugs. And, to a large extent, how much I enjoy a good broken bit of game.

Why? For the reason.

Just Cause isn’t perhaps the most laden of examples, but in creating a world as huge and as free – most especially a game which allows the AI room for something akin to improvisation – it can’t help but descend into delicious farce. Driving down a stretch of road, and seeing some unusual movement in the distance, it’s nothing but excellent to see three cars driving sideways down the road, each seemingly trying to push the other off a cliff. Or see a gunfight break out between two factions, leading to them blowing everything up in mad confusion, including themselves. Or watch a mad helicopter fire missiles indiscriminately into crowds of innocents. Yes, it’s not realism. But then in a game with infinite parachutes expecting any such thing would be idiotic. But I’d argue it creates a world one hell of a lot more realistic than that in most games. Because in the real world, idiotic things do happen. In the vast majority of games, the likelihood of the unexpected taking place is close to nil. But once I looked out of my window (high on a hill) to see four hot-air balloons deliberately bumping into each other repeatedly. One time on holiday in Sweden, I saw a man skiing down the snowless road. So dammit, why shouldn’t games have room for the same? And the only way to achieve this is to allow too much freedom to its AI.

This doesn’t always work out. Boiling Point for some offers hours of fireside stories, mostly involving flying jaguars. But for me, every faction in the game decided I was their enemy, despite the peaceful arrangements I made with their leaders, meaning I was killed instantly everywhere I went. My relationship didn’t last long with Boiling Point.

Perhaps the best example of this ever in the history of the universe is Soldner (SOLDNER! – Ed). Anyone who has played Soldner has a similar story, and sharing them is a thing of joy. It’s worth paying up to a pound for a copy of the game to create your own unique experiences to add to the collective pool. It had ambitions – a German game trying to be a bit like Battlefield. What was released was probably the most fantastically bugged game of all time, creating a cross between a war game, a 1960s French surrealist play, and the Chuckle Brothers. Here’s my favourite anecdote:

Camoflage for children's parties.

I was driving toward a large building, instructed to go there for Some Reason, when I was ambushed by two tanks. Well, “ambushed” is a strong word. One drove in circles around a large oil drum in front of the house, while the other repeatedly backed up and drove into the side wall of the building. The two of them were locked into this dance of madness until I shot at the one driving in circles. This inspired it to drive headlong into the oil drum which politely exploded, destroying both itself and the tank, but leaving in its place, eventually visible through the clearing smoke, a green Jeep, with a soldier sat at the wheel, who was wearing a red beret.

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