Posts Tagged ‘Deconstructeam’

Devolver Will Be Watching Over Gods Will Be Watching

By Nathan Grayson on August 14th, 2013.

Go team!

Here is my drum. It is a good drum. When I beat it, it goes, “GODS WILL BE WATCHING IS SUPER GREAT. THE PROSPECT OF AN EXPANDED VERSION IS VERY EXCITING.” A curiously specific percussive sound, yes, but one that I very much appreciate. Thus, I refuse to stop beating it until this Earth is naught but ash and dust. Or until the game comes out. Whichever happens first. Good news on that front, too: Devolver’s jumped on board to sweeten the already crowdfunded pot. The harrowing, ethical-choice-based disaster survival (and puppy petting) sim will now receive¬†double the final amount it makes on Indiegogo.

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Watch Gods Will Be Watching Expand Into A Full Game

By Nathan Grayson on July 17th, 2013.

The puppy is back. Hooray! I don't really care about anyone else to be honest

Gods Will Be Watching is one of the absolute best jam games I’ve ever played. The original, still-free version is remarkably robust for having burbled together in the cauldrons of Ludum Dare in a mere 48 hours, and its concept is wickedly inventive despite that. Basically, it’s Oregon Trail meets the creeping madness of insurmountable catastrophe, with your band of survivors slowly bleeding sanity as time, hunger, sickness, and the elements take their toll. It’s an incredibly bleak little thing, but a massively interesting one. But now would you look at it? It’s all growed up! Or at least, it will be assuming it ¬† rakes in a little spending money on Indiegogo.

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Gods Will Be Watching Is The Saddest Survival Sim

By Nathan Grayson on May 1st, 2013.

The only sound I ever heard during my playthrough of Gods Will Be Watching was the crackling of a fire. Slowly but surely, its embers would die, because when you’re stranded in the freezing cold and slowly succumbing to disease, there’s no easy fix-all. Just increasingly high prices that buy you a few more moldy scraps of time. So I’d heap more wood onto the wheezing ash, and my group’s flame would spring back to life, but it never quite returned to the lively, hopeful blaze of day one.¬†Neither did my people. One by one, the little squad of survivors I was managing fell apart. Distrust, discord, and madness flooded delirious minds while empty stomachs’ pleas fell on deaf ears. I wanted to hold it all together, I did, but one man can only do so much.

On my grave, I pray they write, “At least he didn’t let the dog die. All things considered, he was really good about that.” Also, I hope they omit the part where I strongly considered killing my engineer with my own two hands because he wasn’t worth his own weight in food. That was maybe one of my less glamorous moments.

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