Posts Tagged ‘demo’

Howzaaaaaaaaa! Don Bradman Cricket 14 Demo Steps Up

By Alice O'Connor on May 23rd, 2014.

Get in, my son!

I enjoy a spot of cricket myself, knocking a ball around the park with chums on summer afternoons, but have never played a cricket video game. Seeing that a demo for Don Bradman Cricket 14 arrived on Steam yesterday, I thought I’d not only share that news with the awfully English RPS readership but have a crack myself. Grabbing the only controller I have at hand, I launched into it and, er, felt like a horrible old Luddite mumbling “It’s not much like cricket, is it?”

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We’re Going Underground: KeeperRL

By Adam Smith on May 22nd, 2014.

If someone has made a game that mixes Dwarf Fortress with The Sims, I haven’t played it yet. I really want to play it though. Instead of mountainhomes and goblin raiders, there would be suburbs and plagues of hipsters. The beautifully ugly dive bar on the corner is reconfigured into a barista training school, where the only skill taught is ‘nonchalant superiority’. People would still lose their minds if they didn’t have enough chairs but instead of sealing themselves in a room and engraving, they’d hit the streets and form vigilante gangs.

KeeperRL is not that game but it is one of my favourite current DF-lites, with a strong Dungeon Keeper vibe as the name suggests. I’ve written about it before and an updated alpha release and crowdfunding success are reason enough to return to the underground.

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Monster Mash? Combat Mission: Red Thunder Demo Out

By Alice O'Connor on May 20th, 2014.

Tanks for the hilarious pun, you wit you.

You’ve read Tim Stone’s battle reports from Combat Mission: Red Thunder. You’ve studied his strategies, his tactics, his strengths, weaknesses, personality, most-played songs, favourite biscuit, childhood pets, sleeping habits, teenage LiveJournal, and the contents of his bins. You’re ready for this. You can do this, we all know you can. The demo is out for Red Thunder and by Jove, you’ll out-war that ruddy Tim Stone.

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Jack Into Cyberspace With Hacking FPS-RPG Black Ice

By Alice O'Connor on May 14th, 2014.

Readying up for a run at the Gibson

A hacker needs only five things to change the world: a cool haircut (check), mirror shades (got), a rad jacket (wearing), a sweet handle (like I’d tell you!), and a tricked-out cyberdeck (oh bum). That last one is central to Black Ice, a procedurally-generated action-RPG FPS about jacking into cyberspace and powering up for a run at the mainframe by raiding smaller servers. Yes, of course the hacking process involves blasting cyberdefenders with your cool cyberguns.

An alpha version’s been on sale for a while, and I’ve had a fair lark hacking the Gibson in the demo.

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Rubik’s Surface: Flip

By Adam Smith on May 12th, 2014.

Take me out for a romantic meal and you’ll have to order that fourth bottle of wine before I reveal an emotion and even then it’s likely to warp into a desire to find a dark underground club that plays music sucked from the scabby centre of the nineties. A bellyfull of Pinot Noir and a blast of Longpigs, and I’m done – vanishing into the forest of bodies on the dancefloor. Not a cheap date, or a particularly satisfying one.

When it comes to puzzle games, I’m the cheapest of cheap dates though, as Flip proved to me a few moments ago. The free version of this attractive and perplexing perception-troubler contains ‘more than 20 puzzles’ but I recognised the potential limits of my patience after around fifteen. It’s clever stuff though and the full version, which is $2.49 (50% discounted) at present, offers more than a thousand conundrums.

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Tactical Terraforming: Imagine Earth

By Adam Smith on April 17th, 2014.

Imagine Earth’s demo reminded me of Project Godus, which is a bit like having a face that reminds me of the kid who used to bully me at school and showed up a decade and a half later in the toilets of a dingy nightclub, horribly drunk and tearfully apologetic. In both situations, the unintended reminder inspires a mixture of anger and pity that I’m choosing to call ‘angety’. Initially, Imagine Earth was a catalyst for ‘angety’. I played on though, clicking and collecting resources through the tutorial, and soon enough I was enjoying myself. The playfields are smaller than those in Godus and rather than expanding simply for the sake of it, Imagine Earth’s colonies must be balanced and controlled. Take a look, or try the demo now.

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Spike The Earth: KeeperRL Alpha

By Adam Smith on April 14th, 2014.

Every morning, my inbox contains at least one email pointing in the direction of a less complicated and/or complex Dwarf Fortress. There was a time when I believed in the dream of an approachable Dwarf Fortress with a friendly interface but I’m starting to think that even the slightest simplification invalidates the comparison. Dwarf Fortress is complexity, of simulation and control, and the games that do have something in common with it often have far more in common with more traditional management sims or roguelike adventures. KeeperRL, sensibly and pleasingly, plays more like top-down Dungeon Keeper than Dwarf Fortress with the edges smoothed and the corners cut. The alpha is available and crowdfunding has begun.

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Parkour And Recreation: Even The Ocean

By Adam Smith on April 14th, 2014.

Sean Hogan recently released a demo for Even The Ocean, the game that he is developing with artist/writer Jon Kittaka following the release of the marvellous, mysterious and melancholy Anodyne. The fruits of a cursory glance suggest that the game is a lo-fi platformer with survival and crafting elements – a genre most of us are intimately familiar with, whether through exploring Terraria or bounding between the stars. That first glance doesn’t reveal Even The Ocean’s depths though – it’s actually two games in one, a narrative adventure and a parkour platformer with a central energy conservation mechanic. Take a look. Have a play.

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Demo Of The Dead: The Blackwell Epiphany

By Craig Pearson on April 10th, 2014.

Follow me, readers. We shall wander through a metaphorical world of cardboard and shelves, passing things that once were but now are not. Here is one. It is labelled Human Sacrifice. Let us ponder the significance of the metaphor within this metaphor. Look, there’s one that says Leech Therapy. And over there is another that is labelled Whigfield. There is no box labelled War. Do you see? We are getting closer, closing in on the recent past–be careful to not slip on the Pogs–and the box of game demos should be just about… wait. That can’t be. It was here the other day. No! NO! That means we can’t stop game demos from being released. They said this day would come! NoooOooooOOOoo...

Wait. That’s a good thing. Everyone release demos! What’s that, Wadjet Eye Games? You’ve released a demo of The Blackwell Epihpany? Hooray!

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The National Espresso: Caffeine Demo And Crowdfunding

By Adam Smith on March 31st, 2014.

What is a Monday morning without Caffeine? A dangerous ravine packed with razor-sharp rocks at the end of the weekend’s gleaming superhighway. I don’t function particularly well until I’ve had my first coffee of the day, which is why I’m so grateful to the galaxy’s caffeine miners. Now seeking crowdfunding over at Indiegogo, Caffeine was last featured on these pages when I first spotted a nifty trailer that displayed its sci-fi horror charms to good effect. Since then, a demo has emerged, showcasing the game’s previous incarnation as an Unreal Engine 3 entity. The release version will be constructed using Unreal Engine 4, and takes inspiration from the spooky works of Monolith, including F.E.A.R. and Condemned. New trailer below.

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Where Time Becomes A Loop: Moebius Demo Released

By Alice O'Connor on March 29th, 2014.

Piazza San Marco, right next to the Doge's Palace. Doge. Get it? Right? Doge. Guys?

Our John certainly enjoyed Jane Jensen’s Moebius when he got to play it last year, but how has the adventure game changed over the last eight months? And do you truly trust John anyway? You can test both Moebius and your gamepatibility with John through a demo for Jensen’s new point-and-clicker, available now for Windows and Mac.
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Temple Of The Muses: Spirit

By Adam Smith on March 27th, 2014.

Writing about Spirit is a rare pleasure, not only because it looks like a lovely riff on the same ideas that Sword & Sorcery EP lovingly explored, but also because it has a Kickstarter campaign which has already met its goal. And there’s a demo (Win/Mac). The pressure is off, although there are stretch goals, including the rather grand promise of a world double the size of that originally planned and an entire spiritual sequel. The player controls a man who has retired to a remote mountain village but he cannot rest. Beyond a nearby valley lies an ancient temple and he sets out on a journey to visit that temple. The journey may be spiritual. The temple may contain zombies.

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Raising The Bar: Dead Synchronicity

By Adam Smith on March 25th, 2014.

John has already written about Dead Synchronicity: Tomorrow Comes Today. It’s a promising point and click adventures so, try as we might, it was impossible to prevent him from singing the praises it was due when the project arrived on Kickstarter. With 18 days left on the clock and $30,000 to raise, the Kickstarter is still a good distance from the finish line in both senses. Updates have been regular though and the latest combines my two greatest loves – artistic creation and a barman. Both tend to the spirits.

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