Posts Tagged ‘Diary’

A Dad In A Dungeon: The Final Part

By John Walker on May 10th, 2012.

Remember snails? How friendly the now seem.

Dentist by day, dungeoneer by night, John’s dad Hugh has reached the very bottom of Legend Of Grimrock’s mountain prison. In the final part of this series, he meets dinosaurs, floaty wizards, checks out walkthroughs, and stumbles upon a rather big baddie. Obviously this edition contains slight spoilers for the end of the game.

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A Dad In A Dungeon: Part Four

By Hugh Walker on May 2nd, 2012.

I like to imagine it still scares him.

As my dad nears the bottom third of Legend Of Grimrock, he seems to be becoming more determined, less likely to tell me he’s quitting, and more likely to turn to YouTube for help than his horrible, grumbling son. To catch up with his previous adventures head here. And then onward!

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A Dad In A Dungeon: Part Three

By Hugh Walker on April 26th, 2012.

Yup, sticking with the snail he's so afraid of.

After once again having stripped another missive of seven thousand ill-placed ellipses, John’s dad’s latest diary in the dungeons of Grimrock is here. And now, after a freedom of information request has made private emails available, you can learn John’s pain.

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A Dad In A Dungeon: Part Two

By Hugh Walker on April 18th, 2012.

I like this snail so much I used it again.

In the second part of my dad’s adventures in Legend Of Grimrock (you can read part one here) we learn why my dad never goes anywhere in games and takes three million years to finish them. We also learn that he’s putting off writing about the bit where he got stuck and had to have me do it for him. To the dungeons!

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A Dad In A Dungeon: Part One

By Hugh Walker on April 11th, 2012.

This is too scary for dads! Ban it!

Legend Of Grimrock is out today, and we enormously recommend you get it. In fact, John was so fondly reminded of playing Dungeon Master with his dad, 25 years ago, that he decided to get his dad to play it too.

Hugh Walker, dentist and life-long gamer, begins the diary of his experiences below.

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Shogun 2: The Rise And Fall Of Reginald Samurai, Part 3

By Dan Griliopoulos on April 9th, 2012.


Dan fights against the inexorable tides of history to bring traditionalism back to the the Japanese archipelago. Part One. Part Two. And now:

Months have passed. Togichi and Fukushima have become relative havens of tranquility – but Hitachi is a permanent wreck; I’ve fought at least a battle there every month, the first three months recapturing it from another rebel force I bribed into existence to kill off the Jozai, and then twelve months of defending it from the huge armies of new enemies; Odawara and Nagaoka, who have changed sides to Imperial, ostensibly to piss off the shogun, but mainly from realpolitik, and Kakegawa.
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Shogun 2: The Rise And Fall Of Reginald Samurai, Part 2

By Dan Griliopoulos on April 6th, 2012.

Dan Gril returns to continue his inevitably doomed attempts to restore traditionalism to an increasingly modernised Japan in Total War: Shogun 2: Fall of The Samurai. Here’s part 1 in case you missed it.

It’s misty out there. A thick old pea souper soaking into the old Japanese wood. Did you know that a Japanese wood called Aokigahara is the world’s second worst suicide hotspot (after the Golden Gate Bridge)? Apparently, the police have a yearly trawl of the forest for any bodies they’ve missed. It’s got so bad that they’ve stopped publishing the numbers, for fear of encouraging people.

Anyway, knowing that makes me feel much worse. Somewhere in the fug of this digital wood is a huge rebel army, comprising about 1500 gunners and 200 sabre-toting horsemen, all after my blood.
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Shogun 2: The Rise And Fall Of Reginald Samurai, Part 1

By Dan Griliopoulos on April 3rd, 2012.

Aren't you a little tall for a shogunate?

Dan has been playing through Total War: Shogun 2 – Fall of the Samurai for us. Here’s the first diary of his attempts to restore traditionalism to an empire heading towards modernisation: a tale of betrayal, Fukushima and Project Gutenberg.
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Ian Football, Part 1: “Barren Spell”

By Alec Meer on January 30th, 2012.

Related to another Ian

A sad truth: it would, perhaps, be all too easy to pen another RPG diary. It’s all about the anecdotes, rather than discovery and learning. I’ve had an itch to start work on another mega-long feature for a while, but I’ve struggled to identify a game I’d like to do it with – I want to surprise myself, not repeat myself. So, when a Twitter shout-out brought up the presumably mickey-taking suggestion of Football Manager 2012, it actually made perfect sense. I know almost nothing about football, after all, apart from that it features an angry man called Wayne who has hair plugs and likes prostitutes. Truly, I would be a stranger in a strange land. I would learn. I would struggle. I would suffer. I might even learn a little something about feet and balls. Are you hunching uncomfortably in front of your PC? Then let us begin.
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Solium Infernum: The Complete Battle for Hell

By Alec Meer on January 3rd, 2012.



Normal service resumes tomorrow, at least if four men sleepily trying to remember how to login to our CMS counts as ‘normal service’. In the meantime, pray enjoy Gameboys From Hell, one more vintage game diary from the RPS cellars.

For just shy of a couple of months in 2009 six arch-demons waged a war in hell. For just shy of a couple of weeks, four arch-demons wrote up their perspectives on the struggle. The resulting mass of writing works both as a multi-perspective narrative of a single, increasingly dramatic game, a review highlighting the game’s merits and as an extended tutorial of exactly how six newbies came to understand one of 2009′s most intriguing, subtle and just plain best games. If you’ve any interest in learning more about Solium Infernum, this is where to start. If you haven’t any interest in Solium Infernum, this will hopefully start it.
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The Complete Risen Report

By Alec Meer on January 3rd, 2012.

I maxed out clothed bathing

In 2009, the bulk of RPG commentary on PC was all Dragon Age this, Dragon Age that. Me, I ended up sinking more time into something rougher, readier, odder, 50% glorious and 50% drudgery. Piranha Byte’s spiritual Gothic sequel Risen was a hell of a place to visit for a time. Here’s my fall and rise and fall again on its peril-packed, amoral island of adventure.
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Sengoku: Diary Of A Nobutoki #3

By Adam Smith on October 5th, 2011.

THAT IS SUPPOSED TO BE BLOOD!!!

(See here for the story so far.)

“We live on the promise that we will not inherit the problems of our fathers in this time of Sengoku but will instead be Lord of the new worlds they have wrought, able to take pride in their works and in turn grant our own children the honour of a name and the produce of rich and stable lands. It is the dream of every generation to improve the lot of the next, to elevate their position in society and their power over the weak and the wanting. We live on the promise that our fathers are not fools and some of us will die on the empty, rotten nature of such a promise. Screw you dad. Screw you with a shinai.”

Nanbu Akifusa, January 1478

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Sengoku: Diary Of A Nobutoki #2

By Adam Smith on September 21st, 2011.

these belong in a museum

“Security is to surround oneself with friends and then to surround those friends with heavily armed men willing to commit brutal acts for a mere pittance, or preferably because they are also surrounded by heavily armed men who are glowering and sharpening their swords with purpose and intent. Diplomacy is to be history’s forgotten man, so obscure in your actions that your enemies do not know you are a danger until you strike. Honour is to present a smiling face to the world but, at night when alone, to weep for all the blood that must be spilled. This is the path of conquest. This is my path.”

Nanbu Nobutoki, 1470

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