Posts Tagged ‘eurogamer’

Eurogamer Review: Dungeon Siege III

Allow me to show you all the colours of the PAINBOW

Would you look! Eurogamer published my review of the console-toy version of Dungeon Siege III. Did I like it? I did. Though that didn’t stop me from having a pop at the loot system. Click past the jump to read that and another choice extract, or just go read the full thing. The choice is yours, adventurer.
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Eurogamer Retrospective: Dreamfall


Oh, so on Sunday, in the middle of our yacht-based hammocking, my retrospective of Dreamfall went up on Eurogamer. The conflict the game generates in me was interesting to explore, and once again its moving story of faith and Faith won out. For instance, I utter:

“This isn’t a game that’s worried about drawing in the kids. In fact, it’s imbued with a strong tone of melancholy that it absolutely does not let go of throughout. This is a downbeat game, and goodness knows that’s rare. But it’s not so one-dimensional as to be miserable. Within the trauma, the sadness, the directionless confusion of people’s lives, is a message of extraordinary optimism, a resounding cry of hope. Because there’s faith.”

You can read the rest of it here. And I really whole-heartedly recommend reading my interview with creator Ragnar Tørnquist. I think it’s one of the best things wot I’ve done.

EG Retro: Legend Of Kyrandia + MAPS!

Remember when games had graphics, eh?

This weekend saw my Eurogamer retrospective of one of the lesser-remembered adventure games of the early Nineties, the Legend Of Kyrandia: Book One. It contained moments like,

“It contained a single cursor. I’m not really sure what to do with this information. Does it undermine everything? Is everything that’s being produced now a homage to Kyrandia?

Obviously not. And not only because Kyrandia also suffers from the same issues. To say the story owes something to the King’s Quest series is a bit like saying Vodafone owes something to the Inland Revenue. In this fairytale land an evil wizard – brilliantly named Malcolm – is removing all the magic and, er, killing a few trees.”

And rather delightfully, it had me making maps for the first time in years. Below!

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Watch Eurogamer’s GDC After Dusk

I mean, if you haven’t already. Our fine chums over at Eurogamer only went and produced a bunch of scintillating video coverage of GDC, complete with appearances from a selection of gaming royalty. The full round of up episodes is here. “Guests will include the artist formerly known as Cliffy B, Frontier’s David Braben and Peter “You never know, he might accidentally announce his new game” Molyneux.* Not to mention Ron Gilbert of Monkey Island fame, Minecraft creator Markus Persson and several more.” That line up talk games, and pretty much underline why GDC is such an important conference, each and every year. Worth a look.

Eurogamer Retro: You Don’t Know Jack Vol. 1

I love you, question four.

After Richard Cobbett’s impressions of You Don’t Know Jack, it encouraged me to go all the way back to the beginning to play the original 1995 edition. And then write about it for Eurogamer. It contains things like,

“It’s a quiz game. And wow, do those usually suck as videogames. The late nineties and early 2000s were a time of great darkness, as those who cared about gaming looked at the best-seller charts and saw inane, lazy crap like the Who Wants To Be A Millionaire and Weakest Link games sitting in the top spot, presumably bought by the masses resulting from a mad scientist splicing slug brains into humans. But You Don’t Know Jack was something else. First and foremost, it began as a videogame, despite a few attempts at making television shows out of it. It was intended to be played this way. Yes, it pretends to award prize money, but here it acts as points for a high score. And it was really damned funny.”

You can read the rest here.

Eurogamer Review: Edna & Harvey

A wacky cast of seriously mentally ill people.

Back in 2008 it came to our attention that a German team, Daedalic, were planning a slew of new adventure titles. Of those, the environmentally themed A New Beginning has recently received it’s German demo, The Whispered World has been released and was flawed but charming, and finally there was Edna & Harvey: The Breakout. It’s out very soon, and my review has appeared on Eurogamer. For a taste, read on.

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Eurogamer Retro: Tron 2.0

Mercury's not as good as 13. I'm just saying.

Do you know what I did? You do? Oh. So yeah, I wrote about Tron 2.0 for Eurogamer. With the new movie coming out soon, it seemed a good time to go back to a game that is oddly similar to the plot of the next film. I wrote words. Some of them were:

My lasting memories were of three things: 1) The pink worm monster thing I could never beat. 2) The light cycle races I could never win. 3) The Disc weapon. What I’d forgotten was that it was in many ways as much of an RPG as Deus Ex. Not only is there a good deal of walking through friendly areas, or areas populated with friendly NPCs at least, but there’s a lot of chitchat with them and your companions. Combined with this is the levelling up – something that’s so incredibly rarely featured in an FPS. And then on top of that is the absolutely superb way it lets you add in various abilities, augmentations and weapons.

Eurogamer Retro: Myst

I hate Myst.

A hundred years ago, when I first started out writing reviews for PC Gamer, I was sent the adventure games. This was partly because I knew a lot about adventure games, but mostly because they were far more likely to be awful. And everyone hates me. Which meant I suffered at the hands of Myst. Myst, a game more tedious than being shown someone’s photographs after they’ve been on holiday to Swindon, spawned so many copycat pre-rendered mechanical-puzzled miseryfests. And sure, while they paid my rent, my loathing grew and grew. You may have played Myst when it first game out, and in your youthful naivety mistook it for something not purest evil, but I’ll bet you didn’t play Dracula: Resurrection, Jerusalem: The 3 Roads To The Holy Land, or Arthur’s Knights 2. Or Schizm: The Mysterious Journey. Or The Secret of Nautilus. Or The New Adventures Of The Time Machine. Or The Watchmaker. Anyway, the point being, I’ve written a retro of the original Myst for Eurogamer. Choice quote below.

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Eurogamer Retro: Fate Of Atlantis

They were less politically correct times.

Playing old games makes you more handsome, so in my desperate struggle to ascend from “bridge troll” I’ve created another retrospective for Eurogamer, this time about Indiana Jones & The Fate Of Atlantis. Made at the same time as The Secret Of Monkey Island and The Dig, I argue that it’s the best of the three. Despite not having any fondness for Indy. I say:

“It’s a good job the Nazis didn’t have access to all the mystical, powerful idols and machinery that gaming would have us believe. Although it’s equally odd that our fiction wants to take one of the most horrific and murderous forces ever to have existed, and suggest that had they only got their hands on the Holy Grail or secrets of ancient worlds then they could have caused some real trouble. But such is the way of both gaming and the Indiana Jones franchise, and so once more the good doctor is trekking about the planet, trying to beat the Nazis to finding the lost city of Atlantis.”

You can read the rest here.

School Daze: On Gaming Degrees

when words attack

Perhaps a little outside our bailiwick, but given a fair few RPS commentors seem to have worked on or hope to work on games it’s well worth covering this, I think. Eurogamer’s Johnny Minkley has spent months investigating the UK government’s relationship with games, with this third chapter specifically looking at what this country is doing to train up tomorrow’s developers.

Short story: if you’re planning on getting onto the games industry via the academic route, this is a must-watch. The same’s probably true if you’re an employer looking around for new talent. Or if you just like watching the likes of David Braben, Peter Molyneux and Ian Livingstone.
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