Posts Tagged ‘experimental gameplay project’

The 2013 GDC Experimental Gameplay Workshop

By John Walker on April 2nd, 2013.

An undoubted highlight of GDC every year is the Experimental Gameplay Workshop. Despite having that complete nonsense word in the title, it’s a chance for some of the most innovative and esoteric gaming ideas to be shared with one of the week’s biggest audiences, whether in development, released, or some impossible state in between. Some of the highlights are below.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , , , , , , .

19 Comments »

Experimental Gameplay In A Swimming Pool

By Jim Rossignol on December 3rd, 2011.


The Experimental Gameplay Project is breaking away from its familiar remit of quirky digital protoypes to empty a swimming pool and have five people jumping up and down at the bottom of it, connected to events on a large, projected screen. Or something like that. What? They explain: “We play most games within the confines of a teeny, tiny screen in a quiet, private setting. Not next year though. Next year we’ll ALL be playing games on the floor of an 19th century swimming pool with tons of people watching.” Huh, wuh? There’s more: “Unlike previous competitions… there is a bit of a twist: games will run on 02L > Outside Standing Level’s Unita Zero platform, an audio/visual playground made up of 5 pressure pads hooked up to a projector and audio system.” (Pictured, I guess.) There are cash prizes and chance to be displayed in a gallery in Berlin, too. More details here.

.

11 Comments »

A Little Cross: Run, Jesus Run!

By Kieron Gillen on March 29th, 2010.

Jesus has failed. Only Flash Gordon can save us now.

Ironically, it’s RPS-reader Final Sin who brings us news of this product of the 10 Seconds theme of the Experimental Gameplay Project. It’s Run, Jesus Run! It’s all based on the gospel. It happens in 10 seconds. Left and right move. Space bar does Jesus stuff. Run, Jesus Run!

, , , , , .

117 Comments »

Free Bird: Beluah & The Hundred Birds

By Kieron Gillen on February 1st, 2010.

I started the week by playing the experimental gameplay game that Jake Elliot sent us – Beluah & The Hundred Birds. The current theme is 100 things – Jake’s is a dream-like platformer, which externalises the inevitable collectibles to tiny birds which follow you around. While the main platform levels are a little uninteresting – I suspect an attempt to work a frustration/euphoria sort of dynamic between the flying and platforming bits, but while it does works like that, it doesn’t quite work well enough to justify it – I kept playing due to some lovely crystalline music and the simple joy of building this flock behind me. It’s like Syndicate, without miniguns. It also put me in the mind to listen to Grandaddy’s The Crystal Lake…
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

36 Comments »

Evolve & Breed: Experimental Gameplay Project

By John Walker on July 10th, 2009.

The happiest screenshot in over 174 years.

As Alec pointed out this week, very excellently the Experimental Gameplay Project is back. And as Alec went on to point out, the first challenge is to create an “Unexperimental Shooter”. Well, the first few are up. They are strange. This is no surprise.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , .

50 Comments »

Experimental Gameplay Project: It Lives!

By Alec Meer on July 8th, 2009.

These aren't functioning icons. Soz.

Now this is excellent, excellent news. The Experimental Game-ugharghit’snotarealword-play Project, which you may remember as being co-founded by Kyle ‘Half of 2D Boy’ Gabler and Kyle ‘Henry Hastworth on the DS’ Gray, went the way of Marmite-flavoured Mini Cheddars some years ago. This was sad, because it was ace. Its brief: “discovering and rapidly prototyping as many new forms of gameplay as possible.” To seek out new genres and new strategy games that weren’t Civilization, to boldly go where no major publisher had gone before. Specifically, for one-man developers to create games in just seven days. Its loss was a terrible one, even if many of its contributors went onto great things.

It’s back.
Read the rest of this entry »

, .

35 Comments »