Posts Tagged ‘feature’

Diary: Seven Days Of Dying In 7 Days To Die

By Brendan Caldwell on November 27th, 2014.

I am wandering down an empty road in a snowy, forested landscape and rustling through every pile of rubbish I see discarded in the gutter. Behind me, in the distance, I can still hear the groans. When I started playing 7 Days To Die, I was sceptical. The crudeness of the graphics and the presentation in the trailer suggest some kind of rough hewn Minecraft clone, a bargain bucket DayZ. But one (in-game) week into this blocky zombie apocalypse and I am thoroughly enjoying myself, finding the game still has lots to offer. Years of videogames should have taught me by now that visual quality means nothing when it comes to how the thing actually plays. As the old saying goes: “You should never judge a procedurally-generated doomsday scenario with extensive crafting mechanics by its cover.”

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Impressions: Mordheim Early Access

By Adam Smith on November 27th, 2014.

Mordheim: City of the Damned has been on my radar since I first saw it at Gamescom earlier this year. An adaptation of one of Games Workshop’s Warhammer Fantasy spin-offs, it’s a tactical game of skirmishing warbands in a chaos-stricken city. I’ve been poking around the city since Early Access began a few days ago and while the foundations are impressive, it’s not quite ready for an influx of new inhabitants.

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Have You Played… Proun?

By Alec Meer on November 27th, 2014.

It was long ago and it was far away, and it was so much better than it was today. That’s not true, actually, it’s been an amazing year for games. But Proun still feels like it came from another era, one of surprise and subversion. Just a matter of abundance, I suppose – throw a rock in the air and you’ll hit three-hundred-and-eighty-two indie games trying something interesting today. The PC had long been home to formalist racing games when Proun arrived, and with clarity and panache (and a ball) it threw the doors open to everyone.
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Dragon Age: The Ferelden Scrolls #5 – Politics

By Alec Meer on November 27th, 2014.

Continuing a Dragon Age: Inquisition diary. Pretty heavy spoilers in this one, probably.

It’s not easy, being a member of a magical class that most of the world is convinced will destroy it. It’s also not easy being a member of a race who like demons and have, in the eyes of some, a culture of religious oppression. This place doesn’t trust mages and it doesn’t trust Qunari, but its only known hope that the evil spirits invading from the sky can be stopped rests on my Qunari mage shoulders. As such, I get asked for my opinion, and my decision, rather a lot.
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Dote Night: Looking Backwards At Progress

By Philippa Warr on November 26th, 2014.

This is me now, waltzing through Dota without a care

Part of a miscellany of serious thoughts, animal gifs, and anecdotage from the realm of MOBAs/hero brawlers/lane-pushers/ARTS/tactical wizard-em-ups. One day Pip might even tell you the story of how she bumped into Na’Vi’s Dendi at a dessert buffet cart.

Towards the end of November most games journalists are preparing their retrospectives for the year that will have been. They’re also keeping a wary eye on the release schedule in case an excellent game derails those pencilled-in Game Of The Year ideas. I spent six months of this year working as an eSports reporter so most of the games I focused on had been around for years. Freshness would come from patches and updates, new characters, weird showmatch modes, twists in the metagame and team roster changes. It’s a huge amount to absorb so new releases took a back seat. I played Dota or CS:GO, learned about LoL and picked my way through the basics of World of Tanks.

As a result, 2014 for me was more about progress in existing games than seeking out the new. That’s why I ended up going back to a Tumblr I started when I was still pretty new to Dota 2. It was to get a sense of that progess – of the distance between nubnub Pip and the Pip who now plays on a team in a games industry competition in which we’re actually doing okay!

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Bioshock Through The Looking Glass

By Rich Stanton on November 26th, 2014.

The contemporary big-budget FPS has a few different strains: blood-n-guts military settings a la Call of Duty, open-world environments like Far Cry, and high-concept dystopias. Outside of open-world most of these styles were first codified in the 1990s, and FPS games then and now share an enormous amount: primarily a core mechanic of shooting many hundreds of enemies in the face over and over again, as well as crossover in areas like structure, goal-chaining, and narrative delivery. FPS games, in other words, have for a long time been constructed on resilient and proven principles. And many of them come from Looking Glass Studios.

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Impressions: Rust’s New Version

By Matthew Cox on November 26th, 2014.

As of last month, developers Facepunch (headed by Garry Newman of Garry’s Mod fame) declared that what was previously known as ‘Experimental Mode’ is now the definitive version of Rust. It now launches by default on Steam, with an option to play on the old ‘Legacy’ servers instead if you’re not ready for change. Unfortunately, I don’t think the game’s quite ready itself.

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A Ranger In Far Cry 4 – Part One: Bullet Dodging

By John Walker on November 26th, 2014.

How to approach Far Cry 4? Having loved so much about the previous entry into the sprawling series, there’s the temptation to just dive in and play like a kid at a swimming pool, but that’s already nicely covered by Graham’s review. So I need an angle. But what angle?

There are a few that immediately spring to mind. Try to play as a pacifist – not particularly feasible in a game that requires death for progression. Play as an animal conservationist? Cute, but limited interest. Travel everywhere by foot? That’s for someone far more patient than I. Then it was suddenly obvious: play as a ranger. (The very opposite of an animal conservationist.)

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Season’s Meetings: RPS Social Club

By Adam Smith on November 26th, 2014.

It’s that time of year again. Time to retreat indoors with a mug of mulled wine and scoff a Christmas pud. You could even make the witticisms rain by pulling a cracker or two. While you can chug the wine and eat the pudding on your lonesome, you’ll need companions to pull those crackers, and who better than the readers of RPS? They’re gathering in London this Saturday evening at The Blue Posts on Rupert Street (map in that link). I can’t promise crackers but there will be good times, drinks and boardgames. Discuss attendance and arrival times in this forum thread.

People of Not London and the North, you may find something of interest below.

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Dragon Age: The Ferelden Scrolls #4 – Ride A Red Hart

By Alec Meer on November 26th, 2014.

Continuing my Dragon Age: Inquisition diary. Earlier chapters here, and once again there are mild spoilers of a sort.

I’ve spent most of my time so far rambling (and in the game, etc). Off to find a campsite over there; off to close a rift on top of these cliffs here; off to recruit a Grey Warden who’s hiding out in some fishing huts; off to do menial work for some dude who thinks it’s more efficient to send the lady who’s busy SAVING THE BLOODY WORLD twenty feet outside his village to collect some sheep meat for him than to do it himself.
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Cardboard Children – Five Tribes

By Robert Florence on November 25th, 2014.

Hello youse.

Days of Wonder always make beautiful-looking board games. From Ticket to Ride to Small World to the out-of-print classic Colosseum, they’re all beautiful and all quite light. Great games to play with your family. Entry level. Lovely.

Well, now Days of Wonder are getting a little bit heavier, with the gorgeous Five Tribes: The Djinns of Nagala.

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Wot I Think: Tales From The Borderlands Ep One

By Adam Smith on November 25th, 2014.

Tales From The Borderlands Episode One is the funniest adventure game Telltale have released in years. Given that The Walking Dead and Wolf Among Us are the most recent offerings that might not seem like such a big deal. Throw in Back to the Future alongside those two and the average number of decent jokes actually goes down.

But Borderlands would stand out as a winner in any company and you don’t need to know, or be amused by, Gearbox’ games to enjoy it.

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Wot I Think: Far Cry 4

By Graham Smith on November 25th, 2014.

You can crouch on vehicles and not be slid off by physics glitches! 10/10, 100%.

Far Cry 4 is a funhouse mirror. I love pointing it in in different directions and seeing the way its design reflects the videogames around it. Angle it one way and the first thing you’ll see in its reflection the only slightly distorted visage of its predecessor, as Far Cry 3’s every idea turns formula: there’s an exotic setting; an extravagant and verbose villain; crafting by way of animal hunting; a mixture of linear campaign and dynamic missions. This sequel could be considered a lavishly made standalone expansion pack and, if you enjoyed the previous game as I did, its slavish devotion to existing structures is no bad thing.

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