Posts Tagged ‘feature’

The RPS Bargain Bucket: Bunny You Didn’t Guess That

By Cassandra Khaw on April 18th, 2015.

In case anyone was curious as to what I was squeaking about last week, this happened. Totally snoopydance material, don’t you think? But that’s plow on, and plough deep into the fields of interactive excess. This week, we cheat a little with the whole ‘bucket’ requirement of user-submitted plushie. Isn’t this midnight-black bunny from rgk worth the exception? Come on, guys. Tell me it isn’t.

Read the rest of this entry »

, .

22 Comments »

Swinging A Stick: How Landscape And Childhood Are Key To The Continued Popularity Of Fantasy Fiction

By Nathan Ditum on April 17th, 2015.

Once at primary school I tried to convince my teacher that we needed a new word – or at least that we needed one that might exist already, but that we’d somehow forgotten. This is going to be a piece partly about words, and “fantasy” was one that I was never totally happy with. It lacked, as I saw it, the generic precision of “science-fiction,” and I wanted a more specific description for that strand of fantasy storytelling and world-building that (I did not really know at the time, but would have pretended to if asked) has flowed from Tolkien’s consolidation of elves and dragons, dwarves and orcs. I wanted to be able to pin, with a single word, that mixture of magic and folklore, that particular set of imaginative boundaries with which I was so often engaged and so thoroughly obsessed. The best I could come up with was “fantamystical”, which, if you’ve been paying attention for the last twenty years, did not catch on.

Luckily it’s been a very kind twenty years for this area of fiction, to the point where we hardly need the word fantamystical at all (although I am willing to give it one last push if you guys are). A combination of, among other things, Harry Potter, His Dark Materials, and screen retellings of The Lord Of The Rings and A Song Of Ice And Fire have made my adolescent anxieties about the ambiguous categorizations of fiction redundant, leaving me with merely dozens of other anxieties, and us with Tolkien-fenced fantasy imprinted on our culture, and our games (this is being written in the gap between the arrival of Pillars Of Eternity and The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, with Dragon Age: Inquisition still questing, exploring and adventuring in the background).

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

55 Comments »

Wot I Belatedly Think: Surface Pro 3

By Alec Meer on April 17th, 2015.

bigger on the outside

Older readers may recall not a lot, what with being old and all. Only slightly older readers may recall my talking about replacing my laptop with a Surface Pro 2 around 18 months ago. Microsoft’s tablet/laptop hybrid has served me reasonably well for work and play, but the one aspect of it I increasingly struggled with was the size.
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

41 Comments »

Grand Theft Auto 5 PC Review

By Graham Smith on April 17th, 2015.

Michael and Trevor. I like Michael, I loathe Trevor.

In the audio commentary for the movie Bad Day at Black Rock, director John Sturges quoted Alfred Hitchcock, who had told him a rule for making movies called “Meanwhile, back at the ranch.” He explains, “You want to have two things going. You reach the peak of one, you go to the other. You pick the other up just where you want it. When it loses interest, drop it. Meanwhile, back at the ranch.”

After its opening act, Grand Theft Auto V [official site] lets you switch at any moment between its three criminal characters: retired thief Michael, young hopeful Franklin, and the psychotic Trevor. You’ll perform some missions as one and, as you grow weary or their plot begins to lose interest, you can switch to either of the others. When you arrive, their story is already in motion, and you’ll find them at home, having a fight in a car park, or perhaps drunk among some farm animals. Meanwhile, back at the ranch.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , .

201 Comments »

The Quests That Got Cancelled

By Richard Cobbett on April 16th, 2015.

It’s a great time for RPGs at the moment, with just about every name, flavour and celebrity from the old days finding a new lease of life through Kickstarter and a freshly hungry audience. Most series and creators though have had at least one game fall prey to development hell – sometimes with their ideas resurfacing in later titles, sometimes with everything simply lost to time. Their levels of completion vary dramatically, but here are some of the games we never got to play…

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , , , .

45 Comments »

How I Lost My Soul In AdVenture Capitalist

By Alec Meer on April 16th, 2015.

AdVenture Capitalist is a free game, in theory. AdVenture Capitalist is an idle game – i.e. one which plays itself – in theory. AdVenture Capitalist is a satire of everything that is wrong with Skinner Box games and free-to-play games. In theory.

In practice, I have dishonored myself.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

47 Comments »

Is Deus Ex Still The Best Game Ever?
Part Three: Wrongfully Accused

By John Walker on April 16th, 2015.

As my re-exploration of Deus Ex continues, I find my memories clashing with the reality of the game, as I try to establish if it’s still the Best Game Ever™. You can read the whole saga here. It’s accusing me of crimes I didn’t commit, an in turn, I start committing some crimes.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , , , .

89 Comments »

Is Deus Ex Still The Best Game Ever?
Part Two: Struggles, Buggles and Reading Huggles

By John Walker on April 15th, 2015.

Here continues my attempt to discover if Deus Ex really is the best game ever, like my brain thinks. Part One is here. Today I yet again struggle to get the game working, then struggle to work within the game. But cheer myself up reading some newspapers.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , , , .

158 Comments »

Cardboard Children: Star Wars – Imperial Assault Expansions

By Robert Florence on April 14th, 2015.

Hello youse.

You might remember my review of the skirmish game for Imperial Assault. If you don’t, you can read it right now by simply pushing your finger down on the button on your mouse while pointing the arrow on your screen at this link.

I want to revisit the game now, one month later, because I’ve been digging much deeper into the skirmish game, and I have gone ALL IN with every expansion. Yeah, like, I bought everything. I went all in, just for you! Well, and me. For me too.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

13 Comments »

Hands On: StarCraft II – Legacy Of The Void

By Rob Zacny on April 14th, 2015.

I am, and always will be, ambivalent about StarCraft 2 [official site]. It is a game I can barely play at the best of times, where my greatest exertions will raise me to the barest level of competence. It is the eSport I fell in love with, the competitive game I still get the most excited about during long, lazy weekends at home. It is a game I admire, but will never master.

Yet hope springs eternal. Maybe with Legacy of the Void, StarCraft 2 can finally become what I want it to be. Maybe this time it can be everything.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , .

44 Comments »

A Cities Skylines Succession Diary Part 3 – Firefighting

By Alec Meer on April 14th, 2015.

The penultimate part of a series in which three players take it in turns to manage and build up one Cities: Skylines settlement, passing the savefile onto the next person whenever the city levels up. Joining me in this endeavour are Jonathan Shipley and Dan Corns.

This time: roads, garbage truck gridlock, smell refutation and New New Dansville.
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

15 Comments »

Hands On: Killing Floor 2

By Rich Stanton on April 14th, 2015.

It has been a decade since the original Killing Floor mod for Unreal Tournament, which was released in much-improved standalone form in 2009. It’s one of those games that quickly turns some people off: the visuals were a bit shonky, it was essentially built on repetition, and the less said about the Dick van Dyke voice-acting the better. But for devotees, Killing Floor is one of those games that stealthily racks up several hundred hours on Steam and swiftly becomes a fixture among like-minded mates, a precision blastathon where the repetition is the whole point.

You got better; the game got deadlier. And Killing Floor 2 [official site] is as straightforward a reload as you’re ever likely to see.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

20 Comments »

Premature Evaluation: Eastside Hockey Manager

By Emily Gera on April 13th, 2015.

As a citizen of Canada, it’s safe to say Paul Newman’s Slap Shot is the single greatest hockey movie of all time.

This is a film so mired in obscurity it’s not even possible to illegally torrent like its thematic cousin The Mighty Ducks, so allow me lay the scene for you instead. Slap Shot is perhaps Newman’s finest work: a comedy from the ’70s about a crappy mill-town hockey team who, after years of crumby results, decides to let their latest acquisitions, three brothers – depicted with glorious thug-moron precision – finally play. The brothers’ savage style of hockey reinvigorates their fanbase and the team is retooled using violence to draw in big crowds.

It’s a wonderful lesson for everyone: Embrace your talents, however impractical, illegal or violent they may be. This is the kind of meat-and-potatoes advice that helped turn Slap Shot into an honourary Canadian sports film and a favourite among the demographic of retirees who like anything vaguely nationalistic, all despite being filmed in Pennsylvania and havinng no Canadian actors.

But it’s a lesson you should follow to a T when playing Sports Interactive’s recently revived Eastside Hockey Manager.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

30 Comments »