Posts Tagged ‘feature’

Tunnel Vision: Actual Games

By Alec Meer on August 5th, 2014.

I’m three columns into this series of Oculus Rift round-ups, and it’s telling that so far I haven’t covered anything that would fit the formalist description of a game. No, I’m not getting involved in anyone’s tiresome war about Proteus or Gone Home, but sticking to a more universal whipping boy – the first-gen Oculus’ issues with readable text, usable HUDs and motion sickness. Clearly VR still being the wild west plays a major role in keeping devs from making large-scale games for it, as does there being a limited install base for now, but the real problem is getting any of this stuff past experiment status. Let’s look at some of the games which try to regardless.
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , .

26 Comments »

Wasteland 2: Fargo On NPCs, DLC & Save-Scumming

By Alec Meer on August 5th, 2014.

When I sat down for a chat with Wasteland 2′s Brian Fargo (he of Interplay as-was, and now of InXile as-is), it wasn’t yet known that the Kickstarted alterna-Fallout RPG was to have its release date moved from August to September. Hence, I didn’t ask him about that. But we did talk about the state the game’s in now, what post-release plans are, sneaking recordings of his revivalist preacher granddad onto the soundtrack, mysterious NPCs, butterfly effect consequences and the importance of continuity.
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

53 Comments »

The Lighthouse Customer: Son of Nor

By Christopher Livingston on August 4th, 2014.

I'm like Magneto, but with sand. There's also a giant butt.

Each Monday, Chris Livingston visits an early access game and reports back with stories about whatever he finds inside. This week, terraforming sand and terrorizing villagers with Son of Nor.

I lift my hands and the sand at my feet forms into a towering pillar. I point my palms down and the sand retreats, creating a deep sinkhole. I am a Son of Nor, a mystic imbued with telekinetic powers and charged with the protection of my village. And I’ll totally get around to protecting my village at some point. For reals, you guys, I will. Right now, though, I’m trying to raise a sand pillar high enough to cover the buttcrack of the giant nude statue that looms over the town. Why? I have my reasons, and those reasons are: I have sand powers and there’s a giant elevated stone butt.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

19 Comments »

Wot I Think: Quarries of Scred

By Joel Goodwin on August 4th, 2014.

Back in 2009, Kieron Gillen foretold that someone, somewhere would punch Terry Cavanagh in the face for the notorious yet optional VVVVVV challenge of Veni Vidi Vici. I can see a similar punishment being doled out for developer “Noble Kale” for his game Quarries of Scred because almost every time I play, no matter how determined I am to win, it kills me with rocks. Always bloody rocks.

So let me tell you wot I think about Quarries of Scred, a game I describe as the Flappy Bird of the Boulder Dash family.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

8 Comments »

Video: Slowly Starving To Death In Eidolon

By John Walker on August 4th, 2014.

The extremely pretty Eidolon is out now – an explore-them-up set in a future Washington that has been reclaimed by Nature. Unquestionably looking like Shelter meets Proteus, it plays differently to both, this game primarily a survival simulator. However, with no information at all, including that bit, I started playing and recorded my efforts. You can watch them below.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

32 Comments »

DevLog Watch: That Which Sleeps, Limit Theory, [encrypted]

By Graham Smith on August 4th, 2014.

When this column first started there were a dozen devlogs to choose from which had been running for years. Now, to avoid repetition, the column hungers for fresh meat – new games, new developers, and untold stories of variables and arrays. Perhaps there is value in holding up older, previously covered games as examples, though. Perhaps they might act as loss-leaders, luring in the timid and fearful who might be otherwise put-off by the unknown.

I’m featuring Limit Theory this week, is what I’m saying, because everyone asked for it.

Fantasy cartography! The best of devlogs! Programmer art!

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

17 Comments »

The Sunday Papers

By Graham Smith on August 3rd, 2014.

Have I got news for you? Yes, and it's all fucking miserable.

Sundays are for getting back to Game Maker after too long away. But first, tight words on the many games we haven’t had enough time to play yet ourselves.

  • Dominions 4 is brilliant: a turn-based strategy game about warring gods which contains tremendous variety, and which is therefore an excellent candidate for a prolonged game diary. Tom Senior at PC Gamer has just started one – or rather, previously started one in the magazine and it’s now appearing online.
  • Read the rest of this entry »

, .

146 Comments »

S.EXE: The Arboretum

By Cara Ellison on August 1st, 2014.

This week on S.EXE I am bringing to your attention the slowburning intimate relationship of two people in Matthew S. Burns’ The Arboretum. The Arboretum was just released on the always excellent Unwinnable dot com, a place that welcomes experimental writing and game design and published yours truly before she really knew who she was. The Arboretum is a gentle and deftly-written text adventure, linear and beautiful in texture. It is a delicate exploration of the feelings of two teenagers whose only dating advice came from hentai and anime, and their fumbling fights their own expectations of romance.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

Comments Off

Wot I Think: Halfway

By Marsh Davies on August 1st, 2014.

Halfway is almost there, but not quite. It’s also a turn-based tactics game in the vein of XCOM, but with a fixed cast of characters rather than permadying squaddies and none of that base-upgrading meta stuff. It’s set in space and often in between it; some mysterious calamity has sent the starship Goliath ricocheting in and out of hyperspace limbo, the “halfway” of the title. As the only surviving crew members, your ragtag group must reclaim the vessel from an unidentified invading force by shooting in their general direction over low walls and hissing with exasperation at the inventory system.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

22 Comments »

Wot I Think: Sacred 3

By John Walker on August 1st, 2014.

Sacred has always been Diablo’s cheeky little cousin. Made with none of the precision or flair of Blizzard’s series, they’ve been bumbling action-RPGs that have attempted humour, mostly missed, and been generic but inoffensive click-a-thons. Hey folks, that’s all about to change with Sacred 3! This game is properly, unambiguously rubbish. Here’s wot I think:

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

127 Comments »

Wot I Think: The Room

By John Walker on July 31st, 2014.

The Room, BAFTA winning mobile puzzling mega-hit, has at last reached the PC in HD glory. I’ve slid my bottom into the slot on my chair, pressed the button that popped up on my mouse, and rotated my head until it faces the screen, which caused a mechanical whirring sound and the revealing of wot I think:

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

76 Comments »

Dote Night: The Science And Ice Cream Of Losing Streaks

By Philippa Warr on July 30th, 2014.

Part of a miscellany of serious thoughts, animal gifs, and anecdotage from the realm of MOBAs/hero brawlers/lane-pushers/ARTS/tactical wizard-em-ups. One day Pip might even tell you the story of how she bumped into Na’Vi’s Dendi at a dessert buffet cart.

I am on a horrific Dota 2 losing streak at the moment.

Unrelatedly, this week’s Dote Night will be about losing streaks and Dota 2. I’ve been reading through the wisdom of SCIENCE to find out more about losing streaks and, hopefully, how to fix them.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

34 Comments »

Impressions: Crypt of the Necrodancer

By Alec Meer on July 30th, 2014.

Crypt of the Necrodancer blends roguelikes with rhythm action, neatly makes that wild concept work, and is out on Early Access today. I’ve been dipping my twitching toes in and out of it for the last couple of weeks.

I’ve long been aware of my own challenging relationship with rhythm – although I did take a certain pride in people moving away from my frenzied, unpredictable whirling in clubs – but struggling to cope with even Crypt of the Necrodancer’s sound latency calibration tool was a blow. I stared at the blinking icons and listened to the test tone I couldn’t seem to predict, gripped by professional terror. Somehow I’d decided it was a great idea to write about a game based on rhythm. Now, excuses rushes through my brain. “I damaged both my index fingers while making a sandwich.” “My middle ear blew because my baby screamed too loud.” “It turns out I’m allergic to the word ‘crypt.”

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

24 Comments »