Posts Tagged ‘feature’

The Magic Circle Hands-On: Visiting Development Hell

By Alec Meer on October 7th, 2014.

The Magic Circle is the first game from Question, LLC, the new studio from Jordan Thomas, he of Thief 3′s The Cradle, BioShock 2, BioShock: Infinite and many more. It’s a systems-driven first-person exploration adventure about a years-in-development game of uncommon ambition, and it’s about rewriting its rules from the inside while trying not to attract the attention of its developers. I’ve played a couple of hours of an early build.

“Attack them, my spider-army!” A horde of chittering polygonal arachnids skitters surges towards a pack of flamers at my command, while I hang back to let them do my dirty work for me. Every single one of them burns to death. Oh, right. Forgot to set the ‘Fireproof’ attribute. I summon their ‘leader’ – in fact an arbitrary member given the Groupthink attribute, which duly shares its traits with all similar entities – and edit its properties. Let’s try this again. “Attack them, my flame retardant spider-army!”
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

8 Comments »

The Lighthouse Customer: I Shall Remain

By Christopher Livingston on October 6th, 2014.

You're doing fine. You got this. I'll hang back.

Each Monday, Chris Livingston visits an early access game and reports back with stories about whatever he finds inside. This week, being a terrible apocalypse pal with top-down zombie ARPG I Shall Remain.

I like to think of myself as a selfless person. I donate to charity, I pick up litter in parks, and help my elderly neighbor with her chores. If I come across a stray dog I’ll work tirelessly to find its owner, and if I find a spider in our home I’ll carefully carry it outside, find a nice bush for it to live in, give it a bag lunch and a tender kiss on the forehead, and check on it periodically to make sure it’s getting on okay. In a zombie apocalypse, however, all that seems to goes out the window from zed one. There’s no I in TEAM, but there is one in I Shall Remain. Actually, there’s two. They both stand for ME. Everyone else can get stuffed.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

10 Comments »

Puns, Promises and Poppycock: A Brief History Of Sim Ads

By Tim Stone on October 6th, 2014.

During the 1990s, cloud flanks were still blank, soft drinks came without A numbers, and the first Sutton Corp BrandGnat had yet to take flight. If you wanted to publicize your latest vehicle simulator, your best best was renting a page or two in a games magazine. Pulp-based periodicals like PC Gamer, PC Zone and Computer Gaming World came crammed with tempting ads for winged and wheeled fare. Looking back on those ads today, certain things stand out like Shermans on a skyline. Read the rest of this entry »

, .

48 Comments »

Wot I Think Now I’ve Finished Shadow Of Mordor

By John Walker on October 6th, 2014.

Now I’ve played for a large proportion of the last five days, with the main storyline completed, and a worrying number of the collectibles and side quests ticked off, I feel far more prepared to give a more definitive statement on Middle-Earth: Shadow Of Mordor: I love it.

When I wrote my Wot I Think So Far of the game last week, I already knew it was great. Now I know it’s brilliant.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

146 Comments »

The Art Of Deep Under The Sky Payments

By Philippa Warr on October 6th, 2014.

This one's from the actual game

Recently the developers behind Deep Under The Sky (a very pretty game where you zoom about as an incredibly fertile Venusian jellyfish) came up with a scheme to allow excited potential players to get a free copy of the game. It’s called Art To Play.

The idea is that instead of paying £6.99 you make an artwork relating to the game which has taken at least half an hour to create and send it to the developers. In exchange you get a copy of the game. The scheme has been open to submissions for a while now so I got in touch with Colin Northway, who made the game with Rich Edwards, to ask what the response has been like.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

16 Comments »

Butchering Pathologic – Part 1: The Body

By Quintin Smith on October 5th, 2014.

Yeah, probably not many jokes on these images.

Every Sunday, we reach deep into Rock, Paper, Shotgun’s 141-year history to pull out one of the best moments from the archive. This week, since the Kickstarter for the remake ends in two days, part one of Quinns celebration and dismantling of Pathologic. This post was originally published on April 10, 2008.

Okay.

…okay.

I’m going to explain, right now, why a Russian FPS/RPG called Pathologic is the single best and most important game that you’ve never played.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , .

16 Comments »

The Sunday Papers

By Graham Smith on October 5th, 2014.

Sunday are for getting back to long delayed Numenera campaigns, to refresh your memory about what those people want who did the thing after the other thing happened in the place where we were at. It’s great! You should play it.

  • Simon Parkin continues to do fine work at the New Yorker, writing about Destiny’s unintended critique of consumerism:
  • Read the rest of this entry »

    , .

    117 Comments »

    Party Games: Gang Beasts And The Wild Rumpus

    By Brendan Caldwell on October 3rd, 2014.

    Welcome to a new (probably monthly) series on the rise of the party game, where we celebrate all things ‘local multiplayer’. How do we do that? We dispatch Brendan to some of gaming’s best blowouts to schmooze and play with the partygoers. This week, The Wild Rumpus and a chat with the brothers who made Gang Beasts.

    There’s a paddling pool full of water outside a nightclub in London. Beside it, a group of young men are wrapping condoms around PlayStation Move controllers. The shrinkwrapped controllers are attached to an elastic string and flung into the water, and three players roll up their trousers and enter the paddling pool barefoot. They are the Jellyfish Stompers.

    Read the rest of this entry »

    , , , , , , , , , , .

    20 Comments »

    Verde Station: In Conversation

    By RPS on October 3rd, 2014.

    The bark is worse than the bite

    Space is the place, they say, and walking is the thing. Duelboot launched Verde Station on Steam Early Access last week, and Pip and Alice have separately explored it, poking around and admiring flora all alone in a space station where something’s a bit off. Then they got together for, well, not a Verdict, but a conversation. One Alice had evidently forgotten they’d planned.

    Read the rest of this entry »

    , , , , , .

    11 Comments »

    Mushroom 11 Hands-On: The Future Sound Of Fungus

    By Alec Meer on October 3rd, 2014.

    Mushroom 11 is a sort of physics puzzle-platformer about a mutant organism that will always grow back to its original mass, regardless of how much of it you prune away. By doing this, you traverse a ravaged landscape filled with hazards and foes. I played a section of it at EGX last week.

    Read the rest of this entry »

    , , , , .

    11 Comments »

    Hands On: Never Alone (Kisima Ingitchuna)

    By John Walker on October 3rd, 2014.

    I love what Never Alone (Kisima Ingitchuna) is setting out to do. It’s a platform game – very simple, very traditional, presented in a lovely, misty way – about a young Iñupiat girl and an arctic fox. And at the same time, it’s an attempt to communicate information about the Iñupiaq culture of Alaska. A preview version I’ve had my hands on contains the first three of nine chapters, giving a fair idea of how it all fits together.

    Read the rest of this entry »

    , , , , .

    7 Comments »

    Wot I Think: Alien – Isolation

    By Adam Smith on October 3rd, 2014.

    Alien: Isolation is Creative Assembly’s first-person survival horror take on Ridley Scott’s Alien. No predators, no marines, no swarms of xenomorphs. This time it’s not war. Instead, we have one space station, one creature and one Amanda Ripley, locked in an apparent cycle of terror. I was hoping for something that captured the intelligence of the original film’s design rather than simply being Amnesia in space, and Isolation is certainly that thing. Take a deep breath. Relax. We’re in safe hands, and there’s so much to talk about.

    Read the rest of this entry »

    , , , , , , , .

    174 Comments »

    Week in Tech: Windows 9 10

    By Jeremy Laird on October 2nd, 2014.

    Ignore the stupid branding. Embrace the uncharacteristically sane noises coming out of Microsoft. Windows 10 looks promising for old-school PC users. You know, like gamers with desktop PCs. Will I live to regret this sunny optimism? Maybe. Will Windows 10 stop the general Windows rot? Doubtful. Even now, Microsoft’s technical ambitions for Windows seem feeble compared to the grand vision it once had back in the early 2000s. But most of what Microsoft revealed in its mercifully brief presentation covering the new Windows 10 Technical Preview release was positive for desktop dinosaurs and relatively little made me gag.

    Read the rest of this entry »

    , , , , .

    158 Comments »