Posts Tagged ‘feature’

Games For Humanity, Part 2

By Alec Meer on November 11th, 2014.

Continuing and concluding our round-up of PC games to show people who feel that all games are culturally worthless, or are otherwise entirely uninterested in them. Part One is here, and I do strongly suggest you read it before this one if you missed it.
Read the rest of this entry »

, .

58 Comments »

Premature Evaluation: Dovetail Games Fishing

By Marsh Davies on November 10th, 2014.

“Carpe diem,” as the ancient Romans used to say, meaning, “Direct Message the carp”.

Each Monday, Marsh Davies sticks his beak into Steam Early Access and returns with whatever stories and/or pearlescent, writhing grubs he can find. This week, he pops a wriggler onto a hook and tosses it into the gentle waters of Dovetail Games Fishing.

“Welcome to the great indoors,” is Dovetail Games’ pitch for its simulation; all the fun of fishing without the need to cultivate a box of maggots in your fridge and then stand for hours on a mudbank while your core temperature slowly drops.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

29 Comments »

Second Gen Tank Shenanigans In Armored Warfare

By Philippa Warr on November 10th, 2014.

Probably an objective

“It’s not so much that we’re competing directly. We want to take things forward a bit for the genre and do the second generation type of this game.”

I’m speaking to Matt Festa, senior designer on Obsidian’s tank-based strategic shooter Armored Warfare about the differences between his game and – just to pluck an example out of the air – World Of Tanks.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

20 Comments »

The Sunday Papers

By Graham Smith on November 9th, 2014.

Sundays are for seeing off family, but there can be time left over for a quick run through the week’s best games writing. Let’s do this.

, .

67 Comments »

Fantastic Cartography: Why Videogame Maps Matter

By Adam Smith on November 9th, 2014.

I well up a bit looking at this. So many memories.

Every Sunday, we reach deep into Rock, Paper, Shotgun’s 141-year history to pull out one of the best moments from the archive. This week, Adam’s celebration of videogame cartography, from cloth maps to digital records of procedural worlds. This article was first published in 2011.

Some of my earliest memories of gaming are not of the games themselves but of the things that came bundled in the box with them. Whether it was a hefty manual, full of lore and encyclopaedic listings, or a little extra something. My games don’t even come in boxes anymore. Recently, I’ve been thinking about the shelves in the house where I grew up, full of big cardboard slabs with none of this DVD case finery. I’ve been remembering the excitement of opening the box on the bus, surreptitiously because my parents always thought I’d lose the manual or disks before we reached home. And I’ve been thinking about what else I sometimes found inside.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , .

33 Comments »

Have You Played… Sub Commander?

By Graham Smith on November 8th, 2014.

Have You Played? is an endless stream of game recommendations. One a day, every day of the year, perhaps for all time.

Sub Commander is a delight: a freeware roguelike set aboard a submarine in which your band of Russian officers are as likely to perish from malfunctioning underwater equipment as from enemy fire.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

15 Comments »

Blood Bowl Is Unbalanced And That’s Why It’s Good

By Jody Macgregor on November 7th, 2014.

I recently spoke to Sylvain Sechi, project manager of Cyanide Studio’s forthcoming Blood Bowl 2, about their new adaptation of Games Workshop’s game of fantasy football. I had an ulterior motive, though. I didn’t just want to ask him about when the game is coming out and what the new team will be like. I wanted to selfishly hassle him about not including some of my favourite teams and also present my pet theory about the appeal of Blood Bowl: that what makes it fun is that it’s the most unbalanced strategy game ever made.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

27 Comments »

Interview: Katherine Bidwell On The Models Of Lumino City

By Philippa Warr on November 6th, 2014.

Waiting for the tiny band to show up

These are all photos I took at the exhibition – if you want to see the larger version just click on them.

“All our games so far have had some element of handmade-ness to them but Lumino City has gone to the nth degree.”

Katherine Bidwell, co-director of studio State of Play, is taking me round the GameCity exhibition of their Lumino City game models. If you’re not familiar with Lumino City you could be forgiven for thinking all of this card and wiring is entirely a marketing concept, bringing a digital creation into our physical world. Actually it’s the polar opposite. Lumino City was created as a sprawling fantastical architectural model in real life before being painstakingly converted into a digital gamespace.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

11 Comments »

Have You Played… Unmechanical?

By John Walker on November 6th, 2014.

Have You Played? is an endless stream of game recommendations. One a day, every day of the year, perhaps for all time.

Unmechanical has gone so forgotten that even I, despite adoring it back in 2012, had entirely forgotten what it was about. Although I’m also old and stupid. What it is about is playing a little floating robot, with a tractor beam for a bottom, trying to solve a series of physics puzzles in a madly charming 2D puzzler.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

8 Comments »

Wot I Think- The Binding Of Isaac: Rebirth

By Alec Meer on November 6th, 2014.

2011’s The Binding Of Isaac was the evil, twisted twin to Spelunky – both perma-death, procedurally-generated games with superficial accessibility masking extreme precision of design and a long path to mastery. Isaac, though, went for an over-caffeinated shmup angle rather than measured puzzle-platforming. A tale of a young boy descending into a hellish world of blood, faeces and religious perversion in search of some kind of redemption, what it’s really about is surviving a horde of monsters with the help of gruesome upgrades. The Binding Of Isaac: Rebirth is a new version in a new engine, with new items, art and music. It remains, uh, unsympathetic to Bible fans.

You probably already know if you’re buying it or not.
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , .

78 Comments »

Wot I Think – Call Of Duty: Advanced Warfare Singleplayer

By Graham Smith on November 5th, 2014.

The Call of Duty games are often best understood not as first-person shooters in the lineage of Half-Life 2 and Halo, but as extensions of light-gun rail shooters. They’re games set in strictly scripted corridors, with one button to pop in and out of cover, one to shoot, and another to reload. That you can move your legs around a bit hardly matters, and taken on these terms, the entries in the series which lean towards boyish action romp are at least lightly entertaining.

Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare resists even these acts of apologia. If the first Crysis game was made by a team of people asking themselves, “How can we create a videogame which approximates the thrilling freedom and power of being a super-suited soldier?”, Advanced Warfare was made by people asking, “How can we create a Call of Duty game that approximates the thrilling freedom and power of playing Crysis?” Much like the metallic ‘exosuits’ that wrap around its grizzled heroes, this is Call of Duty wearing the artificial shell of a more interesting game.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

93 Comments »

Hands On: The Man-Versus-Monster Battles Of Titan Souls

By Marsh Davies on November 5th, 2014.

That definitely represents an eye, right?

Presumably calling the game The Legend of Colossus Souls was considered just that little bit too direct. To be fair, naming the obvious inspirations here doesn’t do justice to Titan Souls’ own invention – a combat system which is so simple and taut, yet from which the game conjures a series of elaborate and ever-inventive boss battles.

Originally made for a Ludum Dare competition (you can read Nathan’s impressions of that early version here), Titan Souls has now blossomed into a full game due out early next year. A sprawling, derelict world of overgrown temples, icy rivers and fiery caverns now awaits, and within lurk around two dozen gargantuan foes. It takes the mournful feel and monstrous populace of Shadow of the Colossus, and presents it from the pixellated perspective of the Zelda games of yore. And, as with Dark Souls, you consume the primeval soul of each megabeast you slay. The combat shares that series’ lack of compromise, too: you will die and die again facing each of these monsters, every time getting a bit wiser to their weaknesses, a shade more adept at avoiding their attacks.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

5 Comments »

Cardboard Children – Tragedy Looper

By Robert Florence on November 4th, 2014.

Hello youse.

I’ve been very busy with the release of my horror feature film (on Vimeo On Demand and 10% of every rental or sale to women’s aid charities – do excuse the plug) but I’ve still had time to play some board games.

Shall we enter the loop?

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

24 Comments »