Posts Tagged ‘feature’

World Of Warships Hands-On: Overcoming Skepticism

By Graham Smith on September 9th, 2014.

World of Tanks makes sense. It’s Counter-Strike with moveable turrets; angry houses hiding behind placid houses, streets like corridors, cannons like machineguns, machineguns also like machineguns.

World of Warplanes makes sense, sort of, on paper. Planes. They’re like tanks but they fly. Except there’s no cover in the sky, and enemies could be in front, behind, beside or above you. So you sort of just wheel around in circles forever and it’s alright.

World of Warships? That doesn’t make sense at all. How the hell would you make a multiplayer game out of something like that?

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The Risen 3 Report, Day 8: How To Sit Down

By Alec Meer on September 9th, 2014.

The story so far of my adventures in ambitious but cracked roleplaying game Risen 3 is here.

I’m still engaged on my long quest to learn magic, which for some reason involves compiling multiple mining reports for a rather brusque fellow, and it’s been hard work. The kind of work that causes a guy to have to put his feet up every so often. Fortunately, there are no shortage of places to stop and have a good sit on the island of Taranis. Better still, it seems sitting is something of an art form around here. Every placement of buttocks to chair, bench or throne tells a new story.

Let me show you my best moves.
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The Lighthouse Customer: Recruits

By Christopher Livingston on September 8th, 2014.

I love the smell of tiny napalm in the morning.

Each Monday, Chris Livingston visits an early access game and reports back with stories about whatever he finds inside. This week, a tiny war with big stories in top-down action squad-shooter Recruits.

When games don’t have their own stories (and sometimes even when they do) I like to invent my own. Recruits, a game featuring tiny soldiers, is perfect for that, because while it gives each soldier a random, meaningless name, it also lets you create your own nicknames. This simple little feature makes all the difference. I mean, if Carl Arnold dies from enemy AK fire and Earl Lawson shreds himself with his own grenade, you don’t have much reason to care. But when Carl “Two Days left” Arnold and Earl “Girl Back Home” Lawson die, well, it’s tragic… though you totally saw that shit comin’.
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Salt: The Continuing Adventures Of A Man With A Boat

By John Walker on September 8th, 2014.

It hadn’t been my plan to keep playing Salt over the weekend, but that’s what happened. The early access (although not yet Steam Early Access) game has only been out for two weeks, but the alpha is already receiving regular updates. Following my first adventures, I’ve been videoing my progress, and you can see the latest below.

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Hello: Videogames Are For Everybody

By RPS on September 8th, 2014.

It’s time for us to talk about a difficult and complicated series of issues which have affected the gaming community in recent weeks. This is one of those times when we’ve had to take a deep breath and just wait. It’s hard to do that, sometimes. We do like to say our piece. But sometimes you have to wait, because it’s moving too fast and affects far too many people. So we’ve waited. We’ve written something down, and we’ve turned the comments off.

Let us explain why.

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The Sunday Papers

By Graham Smith on September 7th, 2014.

Sundays are days for rest, which means finding joyful things with which to recharge and refresh ourselves before a new week begins. Is such a thing possible on this internet? Let’s hold hands and try together.

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Wot I Think: Dead Rising 3 Apocalypse Edition

By Alec Meer on September 5th, 2014.

Dead Rising 3: Apocalypse Edition is a game about killing zombies. Lots of lots of zombies, and then lots and lots more. Previously the series has been set primarily in a mall, but now it moves to a GTA-style open-world city. The clock’s ticking, and you – and anyone you can rescue – need to find a way to escape before Bad Things happen. There’s still time to play dress up and build your own mad weapons and vehicles, though. An Xbox One ‘exclusive’ last year, today it releases on PC. Here’s what I made of it.
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How Games And Simulations Will Save Us From Disaster

By Dan Grill on September 5th, 2014.

“Were you the one that said I was a super-villain?” It’s not the most auspicious question to be asked during an interview. But when I first saw Justin Lyon speak, at the GaME14 conference at London’s Imperial College, I thought he had a lot of the ‘90s corporate supervillain about him. Something of the Jonathan Pryce in Tomorrow Never Dies. After all, he’s handsome, waspishly-smart and wears the standard-issue accoutrements of a corporate overlord. And his company is called Simudyne, which sounds like Cyberdyne. And they mainly work for governments and huge corporations. And their slogan is ‘Engineering reality’. Even their logo looks evil.

So, Simudyne has the accoutrements of a 1980s villain company. But do they do evil? Well, no. They create simulations. Do people do evil in their simulations? Well, no, not intentionally. Looking at their carefully-anonymised case studies, you can see that they do it for all sorts of people, many of whom are either working for good, in government or in big business. (There may be some crossover there.) From a quick scan, I can see simulations covering disaster management for the port authorities of the Western US, training banks in counter-terrorism, managing deepwater oil drilling, and a recreation of one of Microsoft’s headquarters office blocks for simulating physical and cyber attacks.

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Secrets Of The Ice-Pick Lodge: Pathologic Reimagined

By Adam Smith on September 4th, 2014.

I’ve been waiting for a Pathologic remake for years. My reaction to the announcement of a Kickstarter campaign to fund a remake was odd. I worried, I fretted. My concern was that a re-engineered version of the game would remove rough edges, sandpaper the strange angles and anomalies, and somehow expose the whole experience as more sterile, and less esoteric and unusual than the broken machinery of the original release. Now that the Kickstarter is live, here are details of a conversation with Ice-Pick Lodge about the project and the original game. Time to cast the major concerns aside, and to embrace the horror and the beauty.

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Salt: Hands On With Some Open World Piracy

By John Walker on September 4th, 2014.

I would never have imagined, just a few years ago, that we’d be spoilt for choice when it came to open-world adventure/survival games. I remember back in 2010 writing about my wish for more games that would just let me hunker down, find a cave, and survive the elements.

At the time, a few suggestions for games offering this were made, but many were very primitive (in the wrong ways), or far too close to management games. But now we’re overwhelmed with them! Just recently there’s been the mix of genteel to ultra-terrifying with Eidolon, The Forest, Darkwood, The Long Dark, Miasmata, Rust, 7 Days To Die, Nether, Project Zomboid, Don’t Starve… and now you can add first-person early-access explore-me-do Salt to the calmest end of that list. My thoughts so far, and 25 minutes of in-game footage, below.

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Dote Night: The Pinging In My Ears

By Philippa Warr on September 3rd, 2014.

Part of a miscellany of serious thoughts, animal gifs, and anecdotage from the realm of MOBAs/hero brawlers/lane-pushers/ARTS/tactical wizard-em-ups. One day Pip might even tell you the story of how she bumped into Na’Vi’s Dendi at a dessert buffet cart.

A few days ago I was playing Dota as part of a group of four. The fifth slot went to a total stranger. Maybe it’ll be fine, we told ourselves. Maybe it’ll be alright, we thought as he took Pudge mid. Maybe it’ll be – oh God no he’s a ping fan.

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I Seem To Be Having Trouble Starting Titan Quest

By John Walker on September 3rd, 2014.

Titan Quest is a game I’ve gone back to a few times over the eight or so years since it came out. A straight, classic(al) Action RPG, I find it hard to fully justify why its calm ways engross me so much. Yet every so often it calls to me, so back once again I went. And found I couldn’t start. Not because of technology issues – it holds up extremely well – but because of that opening moment: it felt too good.

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Lo-Fi Let’s Play: Neuromancer

By Leigh Alexander on September 3rd, 2014.

[I've been doing a series of Let's Play videos exploring old adventures, text games and lost design forms from the 1980s Apple IIe and Commodore 64 era. In a time when young men shout over new action games, I will talk softly over strange old ones. Come along on a visitation of a different era that's one part meditations on my childhood, one part adventure game criticism, and one part preservation effort. Bonus: Everyone says the quiet talk, lo-fi handmade feel and keyboard tapping triggers ASMR responses. Please enjoy!]

Interplay’s 1988 Neuromancer game is only very loosely based on the William Gibson novel of the same name. As it turns out, legendary acid psychologist Timothy Leary was the one who originally wanted to make a game about the book — he thought escaping into computer games might be the next psychedelic frontier.

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