Posts Tagged ‘feature’

Remembering Vangers And The Virtue Of Nonsense

By Marsh Davies on January 23rd, 2015.

Be a good vanger and take the nymbos to Incubator, would you? Grab a jar of phlegma while you’re there – the Podish bunch are due a good smearing. Maybe snap up a tabutask or two if you think your mechos can take it. What’s that you got? An Oxidise Monk? Pfft. Still, if it’s Plump-Up, you might try and run an Eleerection – though take care of that eLeech, vanger. They might just be reincarnated pod-eaters who plumped-out to death, but they still deserve better than to cark it in the back of some rattletrap raffa driven by some know-nothing rambler who crumples into the first stinker he sees. And if you don’t win Eleerection you aren’t ever going to reach Glorx, much less anywhere else in the Chain.

If you understood that, then you probably already have some idea why Vangers – re-released on Steam and GOG last year – is one of the oddest, most original and overlooked games in history. If you didn’t understand it then you are in the position everyone else was in June of 1998, bewildered by their purpose in a gameworld designed to be explicitly, unintelligibly alien in almost every respect.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

27 Comments »

Text, Lies And Videotape: Her Story Interview

By Adam Smith on January 23rd, 2015.

Sam Barlow has one of the most impressive CVs in gaming. By my reckoning, he only has six releases to his name but two of those games are comfortably inside my list of all-time favourites – the experimental interactive fiction of Aisle and the masterful Silent Hill: Shattered Memories. The latter might never come to PC but hopefully it’ll arrive in digital download form on the Wii U’s eShop sooner rather than later.

Barlow’s next game, Her Story, has elements of true crime, police procedural and confessional monologue. During a sprawling conversation last week, we discussed how it continues to play with interactive storytelling techniques, and how it has as much in common with Alan Bennett as True Detective.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , .

14 Comments »

Shadowrun Devs On Hong Kong, Kickstarter, Fans & Story

By Alec Meer on January 23rd, 2015.

Shadowrun just keeps on returning. The cyberpunk RPG has has various game adaptations over the last few decades, but it was the Kickstarted Shadowrun Returns which most nailed the concept. Narrative and choice expanded in excellent follow-up campaign Dragonfall, which then saw a further improved Director’s Cut, and after all that devs Harebrained Schemes had a loyal enough fanbase to pull off their third successful Kickstarter, even in an age where there’s a lot of worried muttering about the future of crowd-funding for games. No such worries for Harebrained co-founders Jordan Weisman and Mitch Gitelman, whose upcoming Shadowrun: Hong Kong was funded in less than two hours and now has over $600k pledged – six times what they’d asked for. Blimey.

Earlier this week, I talked to the pair about why they went back to the Kickstarter well, what they’re doing differently this time, how they’ve been able to make story an increased focus, what the community’s up to with the Shadowrun editor and being sent free pizza.
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

27 Comments »

Raised By Screens, Chapter 11: Sam & Max Hit The Road

By Alec Meer on January 23rd, 2015.

Note – this series has primarily been for RPS Supporter Program members-only, which is why you probably can’t find most of the rest of ‘em, but I unlock the occasional chapter for everyone (along with many of our other initially subs-only features).

Raised By Screens is probably the closest I’ll ever get to a memoir – glancing back at the games I played as a child in the order in which I remember playing them, and focusing on how I remember them rather than what they truly were. There will be errors and there will be interpretations that are simply wrong, because that’s how memory works.

The last chapter was dedicated to my brief, complete immersion in point and click adventures generally, but among the slew of comedy puzzlers I devoured at that time, one particularly stands out. For many years, I’ve reflexively said its name when asked what my favourite early 1990s PC game was (or at least my second-favourite; my most beloved game of all time will be discussed in the next chapter, and will hardly be surprising to regular Rock, Paper, Shotgun readers), but until very recently I’d never thought about why. For the longest time, I said its name purely from fondness – whenever I thought of that era of gaming, this was the title that I simply felt warmest about when I conjured its sights and sounds in my memory. It’s time to try and discover why that is. It’s not purely because I regularly find myself whistling the incidental music.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

11 Comments »

The Old Weird Web: Formative Online Gaming Experiences

By Jeremy Laird on January 22nd, 2015.

Usually you’d find Week In Tech in this spot, but it’s been a particularly big week in tech already. With the big Microsoft Win10 and Holowhatsit announcements covered here and here and here, for this column I’m proposing to go off the reservation. Let us, each one of us, reminisce and indeed celebrate our earliest experiences of the internet and of course gaming thereon. And then ponder what the future holds for our internet connections and how we game on them.

I’m thinking less social history, more unapologetic geeky nostalgia. Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

59 Comments »

Is Windows 10 Good For PC Gamers Or XBone Owners?

By Laura Hudson on January 22nd, 2015.

“It’s time for us to talk about gaming in Windows,” promised Head of Xbox Phil Spencer in December. A little over a month later, Microsoft has finally stepped up to the plate with a slew of big announcements about Windows 10, Xbox and PC gaming delivered at its Redmond campus yesterday morning.

The big news for gamers—aside from holograms—is that Windows 10 will not only support multiplayer gaming between Xbox One and PC, but allow you to stream Xbox One games locally to PCs or tablets.

Which is all well and good for Xbox fans, but where does that leave PC gamers, especially ones who don’t particularly care about Xbox?

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , .

134 Comments »

Infinifactory: Early Access Impressions

By John Walker on January 22nd, 2015.

Oh my goodness, Infinifactory is difficult.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

39 Comments »

Hands On With HoloLens And Augmented Reality Minecraft

By Laura Hudson on January 22nd, 2015.

“Is it real?” I ask. I’m looking around at the landscape of Mars, where a dusty, rocky desert stretches in every direction, reddish mountains rising in the distance. It looks so vivid, so strangely plausible that it’s hard to believe that I’m actually looking at the surface of another planet and not the set of a sci-fi movie.

The gentleman who works for Microsoft assure me that it is, in fact, real—depending on how you think about it. I’m currently wearing a prototype version of the HoloLens, a new augmented reality headset announced yesterday by Microsoft, and exploring real three-dimensional images collected from the Mars Curiosity rover using a tool called OnSight.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

106 Comments »

Hello, I Have Anxiety Disorder – And Gaming Helps

By John Walker on January 22nd, 2015.

I have generalised anxiety disorder. It’s a condition that falls under “anxiety disorders”, which also includes OCD, despite more often being categorised under “depression”. It sort of fits with both. It’s an obsessive condition that causes someone to be unable to control their fear, to become entangled in irrational and debilitating worry, and at its extreme, to be afflicted by horrible intrusive thoughts.

I’ve had AD since I was in my early 20s, undiagnosed until my late 20s. Those were some fairly horrendous times, not being able to understand why I couldn’t cope with basic situations, and utterly terrified that the awful thoughts I was having might be real. Too scared to tell anyone, and too fearful that if I did I’d be feared, I suffered badly. As it turned out, it was telling someone, anyone, that was the first step to getting a great deal better.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

129 Comments »

Basic Smite Builds: Krett’s Quick And Dirty Guide

By Philippa Warr on January 21st, 2015.

Smite builds

Fun fact: we have a monstrously large article coming up which goes into a lot of detail about Smite builds thanks to expert and analyst James ‘Krett’ Horgan. BUT because you might also want build info to hand in a quick and easy-to-digest format we’ve made this – a separate Smite build cheat sheet with the bare bones information.

The idea here is not to be exhaustive but to give new players a basic structures for item builds on each character class so you don’t feel lost. Then you can start to play around with your own ideas, fill in the blanks, or tweak some of the items to fit specific situations. For a more in-depth look and to see how items work together check out the monsterpiece which will be going up as Dote Night’s first real foray into the world of other MOBAs.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

4 Comments »

First Look: Battlefleet Gothic – Armada

By Adam Smith on January 21st, 2015.

The news that an adaptation of Games Workshop’s Battlefleet Gothic was in development made for happy reading last week but solid facts were thin on the ground. We knew that the game would be real-time rather than turn-based, which was cause for concern in some quarters, and that four factions would be available. Now, following a meeting with the developers yesterday, I have all of the details necessary to soothe concerns. Armada is packed with clever ideas and I’ve dissected them below.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , .

49 Comments »

Lo-Fi Let’s Play: Where In The World Is Carmen Sandiego?

By Leigh Alexander on January 21st, 2015.

I’ve been doing a series of Let’s Play videos exploring old adventures, text games and lost design forms from the 1980s Apple IIe and Commodore 64 era and beyond. In a time when young men shout over new action games, I will talk softly over strange old ones.

When it comes to my Lo-Fi Let’s Play series, I have just a few hard-and-fast rules. One: No twitch, no arcade. Two: No hits. Don’t ask me to play Monkey Island and King’s Quest unless it’s New Year’s Eve and you’re paying for my party, so to speak.

But today, I buckled. It’s the season for copious work travel, conferences and speaking engagements, and when I found myself in a Helsinki airport on the way to Malta with an hour to kill, I got this itch. In the car to the airport, the Finnish cab driver was scrolling through his dashboard computer, trying to find Malta on the map, I think so that he could tell me how much more daylight I could expect there than here, when the sun has set each day at 3:30 PM after cold-rinsed mornings of perfectly-white skies. Here, I took a jog to the sea, or what I thought was the sea. What are these snowfields, I wondered? Oh, it is the sea, totally frozen.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

14 Comments »

Cardboard Children – Lords of Vegas

By Robert Florence on January 20th, 2015.

Hello youse.

Sometimes you look at a board game’s box and you say to yourself “I am never going to roar and pump my fist in the face of my enemies playing this thing.” Some games look like fist pumpers, and some just don’t. Lords of Vegas doesn’t look like a fist pumper at all. It’s all BUILD CASINOS and EXPAND YOUR INFLUENCE and MAKE MONEY. Where exactly in all of that are you going to pump a fist?

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

14 Comments »