Posts Tagged ‘feature’

In Celebration Of Early Access Games

By Alec Meer on February 20th, 2015.

Nearly done!

I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately, and I’ve come to the conclusion that Early Access (and the same concept under various different names) has only improved my gaming life.
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Why You Need A Monitor With Adaptive Sync

By Jeremy Laird on February 19th, 2015.

We’ve done IPS panel tech. We’ve done high refresh. So let’s wrap up the holy trinity of gaming-relevant monitor technologies of late. It’s time to talk frame syncing or adaptive sync. Probably better known via brand names like Nvidia G-Sync and AMD FreeSync, frame syncing technology is all about getting your games running smoother and without any nasty screen tearing. But here’s the twist. It does that without requiring that your games run faster or that you buy a $/£1,000 mega-GPU. And it really is rather lovely
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Cult Development: A Paradox Profile

By Adam Smith on February 19th, 2015.

“We don’t want to be a cult.” Shams Jorjani is VP of Acquisition and Portfolio Strategy at Paradox Interactive. He’s the guy who reads through and listens to a thousand MOBA pitches and occasionally finds a Teleglitch hidden behind them. He laughs at the cult line as soon as its out there. This, after all, is a company that frequently dresses its employees in coloured wizard robes, faces concealed.

Cultish maybe. Cult adjective rather than cult noun. Bruce Campbell’s career rather than Tom Cruise’s alternate career.

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Early Impressions: Offworld Trading Company

By Alec Meer on February 19th, 2015.

Offworld Trading Company is a combat-free, sci-fi real-time strategy game from the lead designer of the sumptuous Civilization IV.

A great concept with a great pedigree – can it possibly be as good as it sounds? But enough about Snickers More Nuts, let’s talk about Soren Johnson’s new game, an Early Access version of which was released this week.
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Wot I Think: Two Hours Of The Legend Of Candlewind

By John Walker on February 18th, 2015.

We loves us some old-school RPG adventuring at RPS, as demonstrated by our giddy delight at the existence of the Legends Of Grimrock games, and the new news about the possible return of Underworld. So the sight of The Legend Of Candlewind: Nights & Candles gave us a little flutter. More olde worlde dungeoneering! But gosh, if the problems don’t start awfully quickly.

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The Random Element: Scenario Generator

By Adam Smith on February 18th, 2015.

Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in. Scenario Generator is a tool that creates random restrictions, goals and startup settings for a variety of games, and it’s the reason I’ve become happily lost in Crusader Kings II [official site] and Civ V [official site] again. Reinvent an old favourite with the click of a button, as you find out precisely how often you can commit Unprovoked Murder.

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Cardboard Children – Star Realms/Death Angel

By Robert Florence on February 17th, 2015.

Hello youse.

Last week someone on Twitter said to me “Brother, beloved brother, God of Games, you have been recommending a lot of very expensive board games recently,” or words to that effect. And I was all like – “Have I?” And then I checked and I kinda have been. So this week I want to quickly tell you about two inexpensive little games, one old and one new, that I think are great games for the price. Shall we start with the new one?

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Evolve Wot I Think-In-Progress: Conclusion

By Alec Meer on February 17th, 2015.

Please note this is the last instalment of a multi-part Wot I Think (done that way as we didn’t have pre-release code) and may seem a little bamboozling out of that context. Previous instalments – one and two.

One week later isn’t anything like enough to be definitive about any online shooter. No matter how few parts it might have will inherently shift and – oh, I’m so sorry – evolve over time, so I’m not going to pretend this is anything like a definitive judgement. It does, however, mark the likely end of my own time with Evolve [official site], at least until the DLC monsters arrive.

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Hands On: Cities – Skylines

By Adam Smith on February 17th, 2015.

With release less than a month away, Cities: Skylines [official site] could well be creaking under the weight of expectations. 2013’s SimCity left citybuilding fans hungry. Cities XXL didn’t satisfy the pangs, leaving Skylines in the unenviable position of having a ravenous audience in waiting, the majority of whom have already sent a couple of lackluster meals back to the kitchen.

It could be worse, of course. Everyone could have eaten the first dish that was set in front of them and headed for home. Skylines has a captive audience and at the ParadoxCon last week, I had my first chance to take a close look at what it’ll be serving up for them. I played for over an hour, long enough to purchase two extra plots of land and fill them with great looping roads, beachfront residential properties and a couple of graveyards. The signs are very good indeed.

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Impressions: Lucius II

By Adam Smith on February 17th, 2015.

The Devil might have all the best tunes but his latest game is a stinker. The original Lucius looked like it’d be a sandbox Satanic murder ‘em up but turned out to be something closer to a shonky 3d point and click game, with prescripted kills that required specific inputs, objects and (sometimes) timing. For the sequel [official site], developers Shiver Games have built a game of improvised murder and AI interactions, but in reaching for the stars, they’ve fallen shrieking into the sun.

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Premature Evaluation: Monstrum

By Marsh Davies on February 16th, 2015.

Given how utterly terrifying, unknown and lethal the sea has been to humans throughout recorded history, maritime horror is a remarkably underused setting in games. Perhaps it's a British thing, being an island nation obsessed with naval superiority, that stories of ghost ships and sea monsters are so particularly resonant: the largest percentage of our idioms are nautical references. By and large, if you can’t fathom what a phrase means, it probably comes from sailing. In fact, “by and large” and “fathom” are nautical terms. The same goes for: cut and run, toe the line, know the ropes, touch and go. You can build entire statements out of them alone: “It’s not a hard and fast rule, but anyone who is three sheets to the wind is a bit of a loose cannon and should be given a wide berth, even if, normally, you like the cut of their jib.” Nautical terms pop up in unusual places. Slush fund, for example, comes from the practice of hoarding the rancid fat from boiled meat so that it might be sold on at port. Yummy.

Each week Marsh Davies skittishly edges into the gloomy bowels of Early Access and comes back with any stories he can find and/or simply hides in a locker and tries not to cry too loudly. This week he dons his brownest trousers and hopes never to face his fears in Monstrum, a firstperson horror game set on a boat that procedurally reconfigures its layout every time you get eaten.

My, hasn’t the Find Some Things While Being Chased By A Thing genre come a long way? Only two and half years ago it was largely consigned to the realms of shonky boo-scare creepypasta homage. Now we have dozens upon dozens of iteratively-improved indie imitators, and even the lustrously-rendered likes of Alien: Isolation, which took Slender’s sandbox-scare principles to the triple-A firmament. You’d think, after all the shrieky reaction-cams, exhaustively explored lockers and soiled pants, that a new entrant of this genre would have to try ever so hard to be as effective – and, to its credit, Monstrum does give an earnest shake to the basics, inasmuch as the procedurally arranged cabins and corridors give its replays a Roguish unpredictability. But, largely, this is a retreat from the fulsome narrative structures of Alien or Outlast to something more simple and, ahem, slender: a gloomy environment and stuff to find in it, before something finds you and permadeaths you through the brain.

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Hands On: Tale Of Tales’ Sunset

By Philippa Warr on February 16th, 2015.

The Winter Garden of the house

Sunset‘s [official site] preview showcases a game of guiding and shaping rather than explicit storytelling. It’s about gently influencing a relationship with an unseen person according to your own interests against the backdrop of a South American revolution in the 1970s.

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Video: A Return To The Long Dark

By John Walker on February 16th, 2015.

Snowy survival sim, The Long Dark [official site], has recently doubled its landscape, so I thought it time to return to explore this newly fallen content. And video myself being eaten by wolves in the process.

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