Posts Tagged ‘feature’

Cardboard Children – Jamaica

By Robert Florence on July 22nd, 2014.

Hello youse.

Every home should have a good family game. What is a family game? It’s a game that the whole family can play, obviously. Can’t you work any of this stuff out for yourself? If I have to explain every single concept to you we’re going to be here all day! Anyway, a great family game is something that mum, dad, the kids, granny and the weird lodger in the basement can play. It is easy to explain, plays quick, and great fun. It also helps if it looks beautiful. Sadly, a game with all these qualities is as rare as rocking horse shit (which is even more rare nowadays – jeez, when was the last time you even saw a rocking horse?). Oh, but, anyway, point is, I got a family game for you. Read on.

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Wot I Think: Dynetzzle Extended

By John Walker on July 22nd, 2014.

Dynetzzle Extended may be the worst name of a game I’ve ever seen, but the puzzle is interesting. I took a look at the free 10 level version back in March, and now the full 25 level version is released, for a mere single dollar. Does it expand nicely into a larger puzzle game? Here’s wot I think:

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Editorial: Game Names Are Almost Universally Terrible

By Graham Smith on July 22nd, 2014.

This book should exist.

NEW SINGLE PURPOSE CONSULTING FIRM TARGETS GAME INDUSTRY
Don’t Name Your Game That, Ltd. Has One Piece Of Advice And You Can Have It For Free

Bath, EnglandJuly 21, 2014–Don’t Name Your Game That, an internet-based consulting firm today announced that it would lend voice and cheap jokes to the internal screams of followers of game news everywhere. “It’s time to put an end to forgettable, unsearchable, derivative, non-sensical and downright awful names everywhere,” said company founder Dr. Stephen Farts.

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The Lighthouse Customer: Robocraft

By Christopher Livingston on July 21st, 2014.

War never changes. It just rearranges.

Each Monday, Chris Livingston visits an early access game and reports back with stories about whatever he finds inside. This week, building, driving, and flying robotic cube-tanks in the free-to-play Robocraft.

My robotank, Killdeathinator — named for all the killing and deathinating it’s been dishing out — has just entered its 5th iteration. Killdeathinator Mk 1 had four wheels, a couple guns, and was made of weak plastic cubes. Mk 2 added more wheels — ones I can steer, which I’ve found to be fairly important — and a radar dish to track enemies. Now, lined with gleaming copper armor and bristling with cannons, its become a fairly durable ground assault vehicle. Time to kick it up a notch. Killdeathinator wants to fly.

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Editorial: Why Steam Needs To Give New Releases A Chance

By John Walker on July 21st, 2014.

Valve can’t win. And Valve always wins. That’s a fair starting point for any discussion about Steam.

From their vastly dominant position, with a concerning grip over the online PC marketplace, they’re both the bane and the boon of PC developers. If Valve makes a decision, you can guarantee that there will be more voices screaming dissent than those declaring joy (alongside those trying to work out how it’s a covert announcement of Half-Life 3). So you can see why they might start to form a habit of making changes, then stuffing wadding in their own mouths, refusing to talk about it. However, I think it’s time for the company to start taking notice of a mistake I think they’re consistently making with their Store page: hiding new games.

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DevLog Watch: Super III, Prune, Book Of Dwarf, More

By Graham Smith on July 21st, 2014.

ffs i wish every game wasn't an fps about violent dudebros gawwwwwd

Last week I was in Switzerland on holiday, which meant I wrote a devlog watch but every update was about the mountains I hiked, the cowbells I heard, and the fresh baked bread I ate from my sunbaked patio. It was glorious. Can videogames compete?

Probably not, but devlogs featuring alien platformers, nuclear strategy, puzzling trees and simulated dwarves give it a good try below.

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Hands-On: Civilization – Beyond Earth

By Adam Smith on July 21st, 2014.

Last week, I visited Firaxis to talk about the studio’s history and the ongoing evolution of Civilization. We mainly focused on the series of games rather than humanity’s works as a whole, so as to stay on topic, and I spent part of the day playing Beyond Earth. Is it a sci-fi spin-off or a fully fledged sequel? How precisely is it related to the series and to the much-loved Alpha Centauri? Later this week, I’ll share conversations with the development team and more thoughts on the history of the series, but first of all, here are some impressions of the game itself.

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The Sunday Papers

By Adam Smith on July 20th, 2014.

Sundays are for balancing many interests and inputs, and realising that there aren’t enough windows in the world to see the whole picture. The International rumbles on, an unblinking machine that exhales dry ice as it calibrates the new theatre of esports live on stage and screen. Kill Screen’s reporter Darren Davis makes his debut at a live esports tournament and captures the exhileration and oddity.

As I said, I’ve never been to a live esports tournament. But once you’re there in the arena it’s hard not to feel like every other event is just talking shit. Valve has really outdone itself in terms of production and pageantry. This is not off-brand. This is the progamer tournament. Turns out, it has more in common with WWE than any pro sport. When Gabe Newell takes the stage to kick off the event, he steps through smoke and spotlights and may as well stop to flex. He speaks with the full-throated confidence of a wrestler at the peak of his narrative arch, bringing the crowd to a fever pitch in their reverence. This is Valve’s behemoth on Valve’s home turf.

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The RPS Ultra Super Perfectly Coifed GaymerX Chat Show

By Nathan Grayson on July 17th, 2014.

For so many reasons (many of which I’ll elaborate on soon), GaymerX raised the bar for game conventions in my mind. I usually come away from these things drained and a little bit sad, a B.O.-scented ball of cynicism, but GaymerX actually left me energized after it came to a close on Sunday. The small San-Francisco-based con was dedicated to inclusivity and community in games, marketed foremost to the LGBTQ crowd but accepting of all (despite confusion on the latter part for some people).

To discuss what exactly made it so different, I gathered a small RPSfriend panel made up of Sentris creator Samantha Kalman, Treachery in Beatdown City master gentrification-suplexer Shawn Alexander Allen, Dominique Pamplemousse maestro Deirdra “Squinky” Kiai, and PopCap game designer Scott Jon Siegel. We talked the show’s ups and downs, queer representation in games, a bunch of games ranging from Perfect Woman to Borderlands, and heaps more. Watch below. 

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Braben On Elite, Oc Rift, Dodgy Gravity & Doing Space Right

By Alec Meer on July 16th, 2014.

At last week’s Develop conference in Brighton, I grabbed a half hour with Frontier Developments boss David Braben to talk about what’s going on with Elite Dangerous (fresh from my own wide-eyed experiences of it on a VR headset). Discussed: space, Oculus Rift, why FIFA games don’t sound right, how Star Trek doesn’t talk about gravity, developing in the public eye and publisher-free, and the resurgence of joysticks.
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Cardboard Children: Cards Against Humanity

By Robert Florence on July 15th, 2014.

Content warning: references to sexual violence.

Hello youse.

In this silly old board and card gaming world, heavy, serious shit doesn’t happen much. When heavy, serious shit does happen, I think it’s really weird to ignore it. At the moment, certain people are talking about a boycott of the card game Cards Against Humanity.
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The Lighthouse Customer: Unturned

By Christopher Livingston on July 14th, 2014.

Can you smell what the chefs are cooking?

Each Monday, Chris Livingston visits an early access game and reports back with stories about whatever he finds inside. This week, surviving a few free-to-play DayZ days and Minecraft nights in Unturned.

Don’t let their looks fool you. Yes, the boxy zombies of Unturned are utterly adorable. On farms, they wear straw hats and overalls. In towns, they dress like chefs, construction workers, businessmen, and police officers. Creeping around a golf course in the middle of the night, I even spot one wearing a sweater vest and slacks. Adorable? Abso-cutely! Dangerous? Abso-deadly!
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More Than A Bit Of Alright – Wot I Thought of Feral Vector

By Philippa Warr on July 14th, 2014.

The logo does look a bit like underpants, yes.

Having just stepped into a church crypt I was confronted with the prospect of a talk on art and videogames. This could so easily be the opening sentence for a horror novel aimed at games journos or internet commenters. Luckily it was actually part of Feral Vector.

Feral Vector – previously A Bit Of Alright, previously World of Love – is an indie games conference curated by David Hayward (he of the Leftfield collection at Eurogamer events). The event I was attending had a room dedicated to games people could actually play, another whose chair infestation and projector lent it to talks and a third which was a tearoom and Puzzle Script classroom. Sidenote: the tearoom windows don’t seem to open so I spent twenty minutes having some kind of Lapsang sauna.

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