Posts Tagged ‘feature’

Cardboard Children – GRAVWELL

By Robert Florence on November 18th, 2014.

Hello youse.

This past week, the soon-to-be-extinct human race of universe 34876.5 landed a robotic craft on a comet. To its great credit, that civilisation is fascinated by space exploration, despite the fact that extinction will occur long before any contact with other civilisations with occur. That civilisation is also fascinated by games, and designs many games based around space exploration. One of these games is called “GRAVWELL”.

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Why Sid Meier Is Wrong About Sid Meier’s Covert Action

By Sin Vega on November 18th, 2014.

Spies! They’re kind of dicks®. If they’re not seducing us or gambling away our taxes, they’re shoving microphones into cats or jabbing us with umbrellas. It’s hardly surprising that so many games about them veer into cartoonish James Bond territory, or cartoonish parody of cartoonish James Bond territory, or some kind of recursive humour vacuum that threatens to make Miranda Harts of us all.

But there’s a lot to be said for the more grounded approach. Sid Meier’s Covert Action, for example, steers clear of supervillains and outlandish capers, instead presenting a sort of action puzzle, with various criminal mysteries to be solved via a collection of minigames. Say “collection of minigames” in the early 90s and the responses you’d get would likely be “take this film licence dreck out the back and shoot it”, but Covert Action is a far better game than that technically accurate description lets on – and one still worth playing today. Let me explain.

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An Hour With… Shelter Dev’s The Blue Flamingo

By Alec Meer on November 18th, 2014.

Jazz Shipman

Surprise! Badger-lovers Might & Delight, they of the lovely/heartbreaking Shelter, just put out a new game. And, er, it’s a shmup. But it’s OK: The Blue Flamingo is a shmup with a lounge music soundtrack and hand-crafted models. 32 feet worth of handcrafted model, specifically, which was then photographed and imported into the game. Even the explosion effects come from filming fireworks.

Quick impressions plus some footage below, jazz-chums.
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Wot I Think: This War Of Mine

By Alec Meer on November 18th, 2014.

There are several ways conflict-from-the-civilian-perspective effort This War Of Mine could have gone. Maudlin, shoegazing dialogue piece; inappropriate And One Shall Rise hero saga; icy-hearted death toll calculator like Plague Inc or DEFCON. What I didn’t expect was The Sims During Wartime.
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Premature Evaluation: Miscreated

By Marsh Davies on November 17th, 2014.

That new Tory poster campaign is off to a strong start.

Each Monday, Marsh Davies scours the apocalyptic desolation of Early Access for precious artifacts and/or tins of beans. This week he staggers through the irradiated online survival sandbox of Miscreated.

In this particular post-cataclysm nightmare, I play a bald man of grim countenance, maniacal staring eyes and no pants. In fact, when I first toggle into thirdperson, it appears I don’t even have legs. So far, my survival plans are going exactly as well as I’d imagine they would if civilisation actually collapsed.

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Not Fade Away: How Dragon Age Origins Got Evil Right

By Matt Lees on November 17th, 2014.

The difficulty with explaining why Dragon Age: Origins was super-duper top dog stuff is that on a surface level it was all a bit boring. Nasty creatures are coming to destroy your green, faintly damp-looking world! You’ve got to save the realm, perhaps because prophecies? Prophecies might be a thing, I suppose. Also: dwarves and elves and sometimes magic.

Thematically there’s very little going on in Ferelden that hadn’t already been flogged to oblivion by the rest of the genre, which makes Origins an even tougher sell to a culture now fixated with Game of Thrones. Decapitation makes an occasional appearance, but Origins is largely po-faced fare. What helps it succeed anyway is the one cliché it skewers beautifully, through its depiction of evil and a place called ‘the fade’.

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Wot I Think: Dragon Age – Inquisition

By Adam Smith on November 17th, 2014.

Dragon Age: Inquisition might just be my favourite game released this year. Considering my expectations and relationship with recent BioWare games, that’s about as likely as Saturday night’s soggy kebab being my favourite meal of the year. I’ve spent almost sixty hours uncovering as much of Inquisition’s enormous open world and intricate story as possible, and as soon as I have a few days free, I’ll be spending another sixty or eighty hours seeing it all through new eyes.

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Heavily Engaged: On Wargaming, Guilt And Remembrance

By Tim Stone on November 16th, 2014.

Every Sunday, we reach deep into Rock, Paper, Shotgun’s 141-year history to pull out one of the best moments from the archive. This week, Tim Stone’s piece on grognard guilt, originally published in 2011.

No battle reportage this week. Rather than confuse you with another tale of how Easy Company went east then north a bit then left a bit while Baker Company went west then south then right a bit, I thought I’d try to get to the bottom of a feeling that has gnawed at the edges of my wargaming pleasure for the best part of 30 years. That feeling could be described as unease, or perhaps, disquiet. At a stretch you might even call it guilt.

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The Sunday Papers

By Graham Smith on November 16th, 2014.

Sundays are for cursing international football for ruining your normal, relaxing weekend entertainment. They are also for roly-polying across computers screen in fits of indecision. Play a game? Which game? Perhaps you should read.

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The RPS Bargain Bucket: Hide and Go Chu!

By Cassandra Khaw on November 15th, 2014.

With the holiday season teetering on the edge of existence, it’s weird to even think about recommending games right now. You should wait. Maybe, not forever. But hanging onto your lusts for a few more weeks is definitely an idea to evaluate. That said, I’m plotting to acquire Pokemon and Persona Q the first opportunity I get so who I am to judge? As always, here’s a fresh chapter of cool deals, collated into one blue bucket of bargains. (P.S: No, I totally did not injure anyone for the keys to Castle Shotgun last week. Spoke creatively to, perhaps, but..)

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Wot I Think: Valkyria Chronicles

By Rich Stanton on November 14th, 2014.

Valkyria Chronicles isn’t just a brilliant game, it’s a brilliant Sega game. That means something. Contemporary Sega is a multi-headed beast, doomed to forever bear the wound of its exit from the hardware market, capable of both atrocities (the recent Sonic Boom) and beauties like this. But it has until now, with the honorable exception of publishing the Total War and Football Manager series, never really been a PC developer so much as a PC porter of ambiguous distinction. Valkyria Chronicles suggests that Sega, finally, is bringing its ‘A’ game to the most important platform on the planet.

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Cordial Minuet: Hands On With Rohrer’s Gambling Game

By Philippa Warr on November 14th, 2014.

A Cordial Minuet

“The next step is where you take out your credit card,” says Jason Rohrer.

We’re on the phone for a Cordial Minuet preview session. Cordial Minuet is Rohrer’s current game project – a gambling game based around magic squares into which I must deposit real money if I wish to play, even at this pre-alpha stage.

I deposit $5. I’ll get back to the payment and security side later but for now, let’s concentrate on how the game works.

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Comedy And Tragedy: I Read Readme Files

By Alice O'Connor on November 14th, 2014.

Read-a-read.

Who reads readme files? Me. I do. I read a lot of readme files, from mods specifically. I’ve pored over hundreds, possibly even thousands, looking for weird and wonderful ideas, remnants of history, and fragments of human lives. I’ve kept a blog of interesting readmes for years and even talked about them at conferences, but somehow never really mentioned all this at RPS. Take my hand, dear reader, and soon I hope you’ll stop ignoring these two little words: read me.

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