Posts Tagged ‘feature’

RPS Chat: Why Proc Gen Poetry Matters In Dwarf Fortress

By RPS on March 19th, 2015.

Dwarf Fortress is a titan of PC games, famous for among other things its complexity, its decades-long development plan and its procedural world generation. In light of some coming additions – procedural, culture-specific forms of poetry and dance – Adam and Graham decided to discuss why such seemingly minor detail is exciting and important.

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What I’d Like To See Happen With Virtual Reality

By Graham Smith on March 19th, 2015.

Using Valve and HTC’s Vive headset was one of the best experiences I’ve ever had with entertainment in any form, but that’s not to say that it’s perfect. There are obvious limitations in the hardware, obvious ways in which it will inevitably be improved in the years to come, and plenty of potential not yet realised in any of the prototypes I’ve played.

So I’ve been thinking. Here’s five (wholly serious) things I’d like to see Valve, HTC, Oculus or really anyone do with virtual reality.

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The RPS Verdict: Hotline Miami 2

By Alec Meer on March 18th, 2015.

Adam’s already run his review of Dennaton’s sequel to neon-hued tactical murder party Hotline Miami, but while he’s a big fan, Hotline Miami 2: Wrong Number hasn’t been met with universal praise. Alec, more cautious about the game, joins Adam to discuss what may and may not be deliberate about its design choices, its bewildering story and its bugs.

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Wot I Think: Ori And The Blind Forest

By Philippa Warr on March 18th, 2015.

Forest loveliness

Ori and the Blind Forest [official site] is a beautiful game. That’s the first thing you’ll notice. The extended intro sequence plays out like a vaguely interactive Studio Ghibli animation as your character – a glowing mouse-like guardian spirit called Ori – is cared for by adopted bear-like parent Naru after she falls into the forest from the Spirit Tree. The animation is luxurious as Ori perches on Naru’s shoulders as they seek apples and while the pair build a bridge over a pool. It’s the first cut scene in a long time where I’ve sat back and watched rather than mash buttons in order to move the action along.

As the intro draws to a close the story and the forest darken. A gigantic angry-looking owl has disturbed the natural order of things, ripping the light from the woods and from the Spirit Tree which cares for the area. It’s at this point that the game proper begins with Ori stranded in a tangled wilderness, needing to heal or repair the damage to the land.

From this point you’ll find a tight, polished Metroidvania-style platformer with echoes of Ocarina of Time.

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12 Observations About SteamVR

By Alec Meer on March 18th, 2015.

Through a series of fortunate events, I found myself in a backroom at EGX Rezzed last week, wearing a plastic box on my face, clutching a wand-shaped controller in each hand and walking around digital worlds. I was trying out SteamVR, aka the HTC Vive, and it was… well, in the longer term I need to go and have a hard think about how to meaningfully convey experiences* with essentially involve perceiving new realities. For now, I’ll be merely practical.
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Wot I Think: White Night

By Adam Smith on March 18th, 2015.

White Night [official site] is an eye-catching game and no mistake. I’ve been attracted to it since the first screenshots appeared but I always feared that the remarkable graphics might be a beautifully crafted shroud on top of a mouldy corpse. Not so. This is a slight but satisfying horror game built around a consistently impressive monochrome lighting technique.

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Screw Balance: How Warlords Battlecry 3 Blended Genres

By Sin Vega on March 17th, 2015.

There’s this obscure game called StarCraft – you probably haven’t heard of it. It was one of those games that was so well designed that for years afterwards, most that came after its throne were either failed experiments or pale imitations, and even those that succeeded were just more of the same. Here are a few factions, they’re unique but equal; here’s a campaign where you fight each other faction then a civil war, with each level unlocking more stuff. Get unit x to position y, hold your ground for 30 minutes, insert tab A into slot B. You must construct additional… Mylons. Yeah, that’ll do.

StarCraft numbed me to the RTS for years. Everything wanted to be it, but I’d already played it. Even to this day, I find very little to recommend from that era. In a shock twist, however, there’s an exception in Warlords Battlecry 3.

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Battlefield: Hardline Wot I Think-In-Progress, Part 1

By Alec Meer on March 17th, 2015.

Me, in the event anyone ever asked me to give this game a score

Battlefield: Hardline [official site] went on sale in the US today, and unlocks for the UK on Friday. We didn’t have access until today, so I’ll run this review in chunks to give you some sense of what we make of it without having to wait too long. In this first part, I’m looking at the first half or so of the campaign, which details a Miami police officer becoming embroiled in an escalating drug war with a side-helping of corruption in the force.
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Have You Played… Sid Meier’s Pirates!?

By Adam Smith on March 17th, 2015.

I haven't even played the 2004 remake but I enjoyed this piratical stance too much to consider a screenshot from the previous millenium

Have You Played? is an endless stream of game recommendations. One a day, every day of the year, perhaps for all time.

The exclamation mark doesn’t mean I’m shouting at you. It’s part of the game’s name. Originally released in 1987 (though I first played it on an Amiga in the early nineties), Pirates! was the first game to carry Meier’s name in the title, although not the first game created by the statesman of strategy. It’s a fine early example of open world gaming, allowing players to create a unique legacy within its ever-changing world.

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Job Seeking: An Elite Dangerous Career Guide

By Brendan Caldwell on March 16th, 2015.

A career! Everybody has one. Mine is looking at a keyboard until I black out and coming back to consciousness with 4000 words on my screen about how to get started in Elite: Dangerous [official site]. This guide will give you some pointers about the main careers you can undertake in the game, from vigilante to explorer, from trader to (ugh) miner. We’re basically an interstellar jobcentre. One thing: you’re probably going to want some cash saved for these callings, as outfitting each ship is going to cost a pretty penny, and some of those pennies will be prettier than others. Okay then, let’s get on with it.

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Premature Evaluation: StarCrawlers

By Marsh Davies on March 16th, 2015.

I’m writing these alt-texts on what is often now called Mother’s Day here in the UK, but can be helpfully distinguished from the American day of the same name by its more accurate title, Mothering Sunday. The origins of each are different, though intertwined, and certainly the popularity of both celebrations share a common factor: the pain many mothers felt at losing their sons to war - which is definitely entirely relevant to SpaceCrawlers and not at all a wild digression born of my waning attention span.

Each week Marsh Davies plunders the ravaged hulk of Early Access and smuggles out any stories he can find and/or succumbs to the terrors of the interdimensional void. This week he murders robotic wait staff and asset-strips sci-fi dungeons in space salvage RPG StarCrawlers. It goes on sale tomorrow.

Is it any wonder that some members of the gaming community nurse a persecution complex when, in the games themselves, so few people, animals, robots, or multifanged amorphous spacethings are ever pleased to see us? In StarCrawlers, even the cleaning droids and busboys want to have a pop, lobbing chinaware and squirting me with detergent. Admittedly, I am usually there to plunder their derelict spacestation, or sabotage their data centres, or “deliver a severance package” to a megacorp employee who has, in a literal and shortly rectified sense, outlived his usefulness. But still, it is a bit of a hit to the self-esteem that you can’t walk from one room to another without some haywire robot or grotesque alien hatchling flinging itself at you. “Where’s the beef?”, I mutter to the hatchlings, as I ruefully sunder them with psychic horror channelled from the abyssal nightmare of the void.

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Wot I Think: Parallax

By John Walker on March 16th, 2015.

As first-person puzzle games get more complicated, we have two choices as a species. To develop mightier, more powerful brains than ever before, or to just try not to think too hard and hope it works out. After the Digipen team that brought us Narbacular Drop opened up very apposite portals in our minds, the genre has run with it, leading to the brain-straining likes of Infinifactory, Void, Antichamber, Standpoint, The Talos Principle and Mind: Path To Thalamus. And as the concepts get more complex, the contortions our brains need to achieve get bendier.

I think Parallax [official site] might have given my brain a nasty sprain.

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Hands On: Aer

By John Walker on March 16th, 2015.

I can only imagine the sighs that must have emanated from all working on Aer [official site] when Ubisoft’s Grow Home was released last month. Not because the two games play alike – the similarities are only slight. But wow, do they look the same. The polygonal design of both renders gorgeous green foliage against cerulean skies, growing on floating islands. Aer, of course, has been around since late 2013, while Grow Home was announced then released within the same few weeks. Were Aer due to release soon, its thunder could have been considerably stolen. So it’s perhaps oddly fortunate that the flying/exploring adventure isn’t out until 2016.

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