Posts Tagged ‘features’

The RPS Bargain Bucket: Fluffy Showdown

By Cassandra Khaw on April 19th, 2014.

If it wasn’t obvious already, I have a camera. An actual camera. Not a dinky, built-into-my-phone camera but an actual camera. Obviously, plushie-related images are now going to appear in abundance. (Bargain Bucket regulars may recognize the floppy white figure in the foreground; it’s the first plushie we ever featured on this column.) As always, it’s that time of the week again and it looks like the Bargain Bucket has discounted shinies to spare.

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Impressions: Broforce

By Marsh Davies on April 17th, 2014.

Broforce is a run-and-gun platformer which joyously spoofs the bellicose masculinity of action cinema. It’s available on Steam Early Access for £12/$15, but its featureset punches above its alpha status: singleplayer, online co-op, deathmatch, time trials, a level editor and more are already in a fairly well-polished state with more tweaks and content planned.

Here are three uncharitable assumptions you might have made about Broforce: it’s a ten-a-penny mindless blaster; the whole “bro” thing makes it more ironic meme than game; it’s snoresomely reverent of bygone shooters like Contra. Happily, Broforce dodges all these bullets like a spry Sly Stallone weaving through a hail of preposterously inaccurate Kalashnikov fire. On the evidence of its Early Access release, it’s actually a game of breezy invention and energetic pace which deploys both its nostalgia for action films and pixellated shooters with a lightness of touch. And, though there’s a very good deal of carnage, it enforces some degree of tactical caution – partly because even a single bullet will kill you, but mostly because the levels are wholly and very readily destructible, quickly evaporating over-eager bros in devastating chain detonations or squashing them with falling detritus.

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Dwarf Fortress: The Detailed Roguelike That’s Easy To Play

By Graham Smith on April 16th, 2014.

Dwarf Fortress is famous for producing anecdotes by the minute. The two-man, twelve-year, donation-funded indie project weaves together procedurally generated geography, civilizations and histories to create a rich fantasy world. It simulates its characters – standard fare like dwarves, elves, goblins, etc. – down to the most minute detail, and when all its systems combine, the results are often hilarious, occasionally tragic, and always surprising.

It’s also blissfully easy to play. The game is free to download and easy to install, the UI comes with a detailed and handy help system, and there’s a community wiki full of guides – not that you’ll need them. I started from scratch last night and was having fun immediately. Let me tell you about my experience.

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The Sunday Papers

By Graham Smith on April 13th, 2014.

I'm back whether you want me or not.

Sundays are for whatever you please. Don’t let me tell you what you can and can’t do. You’re free and the world is your lobster.

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The RPS Bargain Bucket: Convention Season

By Cassandra Khaw on April 12th, 2014.

Ah, conventions. While a reason for giddy exuberance among gamers big and small, they’re not unlike games journalism’s answer to The Labors of Hercules. Seriously, these stop being fun after the fifteenth interview of the day. Trust me on this. Brr. Anyway. With everyone else on the floor and alit with excitement about upcoming games, this is probably the perfect time to talk about discounted games. Old games, new games, games you’ve probably never heard about. They might lack the razzle and dazzle of upcoming games but at least you can play them now. Either way, the Bargain Bucket is rattling with cheap bargains for you. Today’s plushie is brought to you by Angel Tear and the number 12.

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DevLog Watch: Curious Expedition, Lift, Office Management

By Graham Smith on April 1st, 2014.

Tesla! Flight! Offices.

The problem with turning this into a regular column is that I have to write it regularly. I have clearly failed this week, but that shouldn’t stop you enjoying day-late development blogs and GIFs from around the web.

Includes: dinosaurs, Nikola Tesla, flight sandboxes, conference tables, ‘game jams’.

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The Sunday Papers

By Graham Smith on March 30th, 2014.

Sorry it's a little short this week.

I don’t know yet, but if I had to guess, I’d say that Sundays are for waking up blearily somewhere in Birmingham in a post-Rezzed fugue. Good thing I’ve already prepared a list of the week’s finest (mostly) games writing.

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To Hell With Other People: Nine Lives in Rust

By Brendan Caldwell on March 28th, 2014.

I had died again. For the eighth time I had been murdered by a greedy neighbour. I sighed. It was time to switch servers and try it all again. Usually when you spawn on a Rust server, there are a few quiet minutes to get used to your surroundings and look around. Not on my ninth reincarnation. The very instant I popped into the world I heard a voice behind me, yelling.

“Who are you!”

It was more of a statement of rage than a question. Shocked, I turned and saw him. Silhouetted against the sky, a man stood atop a wrecked building, stretching a bow and pointing an arrow at me. His name was Blazing Bazing. He was completely naked.

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Cardboard Children – NEWS

By Robert Florence on March 25th, 2014.

Roll a die.

On a 5-6, you have scored a success, and may read the rest of this board game news column.

If you fail, close the browser.

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Wot I Think: Smite

By Philippa Warr on March 25th, 2014.

Frost giant Ymire is prettttttty cool

“Oh God, it’s like playing League of Legends crossed with Jumanji,” was my initial verdict on Smite. I stand by that assessment but I probably ought to flesh it out a bit in this here Wot I Think piece. Here goes:

Smite is Hi-Rez’s god-themed MOBA. Hang on, are we calling them MOBAs at the moment? ARTS? Lane pushing game? Lords management? Wizard-em-up? Magi-brawler? Five-a-side farming simulator? Whatever your preferred label, it’s Hi-Rez’s take on that genre. You play as one of a pantheon of characters based on the gods of various religions and mythological figures and proceed to do battle across a number of different game modes.

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The Lighthouse Customer: Planet Explorers

By Christopher Livingston on March 24th, 2014.

Could you dinosaurs move? I'm TRYING to EXPLORE.

Each Monday, Chris Livingston visits an early access game and reports back with stories about whatever he finds inside. This week, exploring a planet in the appropriately named Planet Explorers.

The title of the game is direct, to be sure. In Planet Explorers, a planet exploration game by Pathea Games, there is a planet, and you explore it. If that doesn’t sound like enough, there’s also resource gathering, crafting, building, and tons of alien creatures to discover, by which I mean “slaughter and turn into money.” Get ready, innocent alien planet! Humans have arrived, and we’ve brought hunting, real estate development, and capitalism.

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Live Free Play Hard: Buried Alive And Loving It

By Porpentine on March 24th, 2014.

Therapeutic living burial. Adorable cat simulator. The ancient sport of gun-hopping.

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The Sunday Papers

By Graham Smith on March 23rd, 2014.

Regular like clockwork.

Sundays are for watching roller derby and wondering why someone designed a sport that was like NASCAR but with people instead of cars. Sundays are for reviewing the best (mostly) games related writing from (mostly) the past week.

  • Critical Proximity was a conference about games criticism which took place the Sunday before GDC. Alan Williamson from Five Out Of Ten Magazine produced a video for the event on an important subject: why magazines are better than these newfangled webpages. It’s a romantic, cheerful call to arms for maintaining, and more importantly pushing, the old format further. I tend to agree, and continue to idly consider doing something about it. But probably I’ll just eat another packet of crisps and order some of Alan’s work online.
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