Posts Tagged ‘free’

Naked & Arcade: Cosmochoria

By John Walker on March 28th, 2014.

Lots of things are improved when done in the nude. Not least replanting the galaxy with life after a cataclysmic event sees all the tiny planets dying. Which is, impressively, the concept behind Cosmochoria. You play a little naked astronaut, seeding planets (ew, no, not like that) while fending off angry aliens. You can play the alpha right now. And the Kickstarter has just gone live.

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Temple Of The Muses: Spirit

By Adam Smith on March 27th, 2014.

Writing about Spirit is a rare pleasure, not only because it looks like a lovely riff on the same ideas that Sword & Sorcery EP lovingly explored, but also because it has a Kickstarter campaign which has already met its goal. And there’s a demo (Win/Mac). The pressure is off, although there are stretch goals, including the rather grand promise of a world double the size of that originally planned and an entire spiritual sequel. The player controls a man who has retired to a remote mountain village but he cannot rest. Beyond a nearby valley lies an ancient temple and he sets out on a journey to visit that temple. The journey may be spiritual. The temple may contain zombies.

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Lamp And Vamp Is The Best Free Game

By Adam Smith on March 27th, 2014.

It’s a bold claim, I know, particularly when the opposition on the ‘Best Free Game’ field includes the likes of Planetside 2, Dwarf Fortress and Dungeon Keeper. Nevertheless, Lamp And Vamp is the best free game that I’ve played today and the best new free game that I’ve played since Tuesday. Created as part of the Procedural Death Jam, and taking first place, it’s a puzzle game in which you play a vampire who is trying to return to his coffin. Pesky townspeople and priests block the way but using your powers (BAT-FORM, MIST-FORM, BLOODSUCKING), you can navigate the streets and find your way home. It’s absolutely splendid.

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Wot I Think: Extrasolar

By Alec Meer on March 26th, 2014.

Extrasolar is a browser-based game about controlling a lunar rover as it explores the surface of an island on a far-off planet, poring over the photographs it returns, and inadvertently uncovering a conspiracy as you do. It’s out now, and while paid upgrades are available it can very be much played for free – as such the below is a discussion of the experience, not the value proposition.

For the last fortnight or so, I’ve been playing a game for approximately three minutes every hour. (I’d like to say ‘apart from at night’, but thanks to my living on a noisy street and having a baby in the next room, that would be a barefaced lie.) I didn’t do much, myself, though the small amount of clicking and reading at my end did result in a remote-controlled rover travelling vast distances across another world, light years away from our own. So, in a way, I did a great deal.
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Your Whole Keyboard Controls One Sad Spider In Spidren

By Nathan Grayson on March 26th, 2014.

Parenting!

Spidren is the spindly, web-spinning Train Jam spawn of Octodad programmer Devon Scott-Tunkin, and that kinda makes perfect sense when you think about it. It’s about an oft-misunderstood owner of too many legs and one lonely heart just trying to scrape by as its brood of children wreak havoc on its life. Difference is, while Octodad plucked out a gentle, family-friendly melody on heartstrings, Spidren does anything but. If you fail to protect your multi-segmented legs by flailing about using almost your entire keyboard, your bizarrely adorable younglings will STAB YOU TO DEATH WITH YOUR OWN FEET. Let this serve as a lesson, folks: it’s not easy being a spider, and it’s even harder when you’re a single spider mother whose children are unrepentant murderers.

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Raising The Bar: Dead Synchronicity

By Adam Smith on March 25th, 2014.

John has already written about Dead Synchronicity: Tomorrow Comes Today. It’s a promising point and click adventures so, try as we might, it was impossible to prevent him from singing the praises it was due when the project arrived on Kickstarter. With 18 days left on the clock and $30,000 to raise, the Kickstarter is still a good distance from the finish line in both senses. Updates have been regular though and the latest combines my two greatest loves – artistic creation and a barman. Both tend to the spirits.

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Live Free Play Hard: Buried Alive And Loving It

By Porpentine on March 24th, 2014.

Therapeutic living burial. Adorable cat simulator. The ancient sport of gun-hopping.

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The Flare Path: Close Combats Mundanity

By Tim Stone on March 21st, 2014.

It’s been another horribly humdrum week here in Simulatia. Since we last shared a screen, early access IL-2 Sturmovik: Battle of Stalingrad owners have acquired a handsome new cloud cleaver, a blistering Top Gear track legend has been added to Cornetto Hoarser, yet another ursine sim pitch has shambled onto Kickstarter, and the FBI has inspected an FSX install in the hope of finding clues to the disappearance of 239 people. What’s a man supposed to write about in drab times like these? Read the rest of this entry »

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Art Failure: Action Painting Pro

By Adam Smith on March 21st, 2014.

Action Painting Pro is a platform game in which the screen becomes a colourful mess as each playthrough works toward its conclusion. Different types of brush can be collected and paint spews from the player in an appropriate pattern, the colour changing as objects are collected. To survive and continue with your masterpiece, you’ll have to manage three resources by springing around the screen across the scaffolding that shifts position after every pick up. The resources are hearts (health), dollar signs (money) and artistic abillity (blue diamonds?). All three are effectively time limits that must be regularly topped up, which creates a nerve-jangling pressure that is only heightened by the nightmarish soundtrack.

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To The BetaMobile: Infinite Crisis Open Beta

By Adam Smith on March 17th, 2014.


Last night, for the second time in my life, I tried to play a MOBA. Infinite Crisis may not be the best choice but I figured the people playing might have spent slightly less time pounding the lanes than the veteran e-thletes of LOL and DOTA 2. Not so. The open beta began this weekend but almost every player seems to be visiting from elsewhere within the genre. There is a tutorial mode of sorts, in which a team of humans fight against bots. If a MOBA were a pair of trousers, I think I’m now at the point where I’d struggle to put them on but I’d be able to explain where the legs are supposed to go. I’d almost certainly fail to zip up the flies though and would inexplicably fill the pockets with termites or blancmange. Launch trailer below.

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Live Free Play Hard: I’m Not A Rapture

By Porpentine on March 16th, 2014.

Eating language. My alchemical romance. The end of the world has a choppy frame rate.

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