Posts Tagged ‘free’

Freeware Garden: Mars Commando

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on October 3rd, 2014.

Evoking the Amiga.

After the brilliant human species of Earth depleted their planet’s vast water resources, it was forced to focus its brilliance on Mars in an attempt to rob it of its own (frozen?) water. Oddly, Martians were less than ecstatic about such a prospect and decided to kick the colonial bastards off their planet. Humankind’s survival once again demanded war. A war, the tacticalities of which, Mars Commando will let you handle.

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Car Seat Cyberboogying: A Night At The Roculus

By Alice O'Connor on October 2nd, 2014.

Who is Chris Miller anyway?

What is it about the Oculus Rift that inspires nostalgia for the ’90s? Other than how that’s the last time virtual reality was The Next Big Thing, of course. Earlier today we peeked at Pixel Rift, which larks about in simulated childhood, and now I’m seeing A Night at the Roculus travelling back in time to enjoy one of the era’s most popular pastimes: rocking out in a horseless carriage. (No, it’s inspired by a different Saturday Night Live skit). It’s controlled by moving your head to dance along and score points. And what do points mean? Nostalgic references to ’90s television game shows.

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Freeware Garden: The Price of Freedom – Innocence Lost

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on October 2nd, 2014.

Illustrating posts on text adventures can be infuriating. Please, devs, make some cover art! Please?

Created for the latest Spring Thing compo, The Price of Freedom: Innocence Lost is a choose-your-own-adventure styled piece of interactive fiction that, somehow, wasn’t created in Twine and, rather emphatically, went on to win this year’s competition. Also, it’s very, very good.

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Freeware Garden: Grim Express

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on October 1st, 2014.

Poor doc. All he wanted was to be rich and alive.

There you were minding your own business and enjoying the luxury and efficiency of the Soviet rail system, when everything went dark and the nice gentleman sitting opposite you got stabbed in the heart. Now the trip to Moscow would be too depressing to bear, unless, that is, you decided to solve the murder on the Grim Express. Or, better yet, actually play sleuth-’em’-up Grim Express.

It’s a wonderfully atmospheric game set in a train, that’s strongly reminiscent of the Last Express, was made in an astonishing 48 hours and you can directly download for your Windows PC via this link.

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For Everything A Reason? F.E.A.R. Online

By Adam Smith on September 30th, 2014.

F.E.A.R. Online’s open beta test begins on October 7th, ahead of full launch on the 17th, and signups are now active. Go! Run! Register! It’s free!

Or perhaps not. The original F.E.A.R. takes place almost entirely in a succession of rather ordinary office buildings but that doesn’t matter because the combat is absolutely splendid. Bullets have tremendous impact and slow motion slides across debris-strewn rooms, ending in a chunky boot to the face, are like a John Woo shoot-out with weighty momentum in place of balletic grace. Thanks to a hard-working community, the multiplayer component is still available to play and I’m not sure how F.E.A.R.O. intends to lure people into its own take on the series’ combat and…gulp…lore.

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Freeware Garden: Die Sieben Raben

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on September 30th, 2014.

The year is 1876. The place Copenhagen, Denmark. The game Die Sieben Raben by Jón Kristinsson and it really does seem that mysterious gentleman Mr. Amsel has just gotten a most important and plot-forwarding letter.

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Show And Teleport: S.W.A.P.

By Adam Smith on September 29th, 2014.

S.W.A.P. is a competitive multiplayer game with the structure and style of an arena-based first-person shooter. It supports up to eight players, split into two teams, and has a novel virus-based approach to capture the flag dynamics. The game is free, has a level editor and is available now. What else…?

There are no guns. It’s a first-person shooter without any shooting, which means it’s not really a first-person shooter at all. Instead, as the title suggests, players have a ‘swapping’ ability, which allows them to exchange locations with their opponents. Tactical teamplay and fast-paced farce.

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Freeware Garden: The Videogame 50

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on September 29th, 2014.

Rob Fearon, the wonderful person responsible for Retro Remakes and all sorts of digital death Mantas, has decided to be vengeful and remind the world of the horrors of the infamous Cassette 50. Hence, The Videogame 50 compilation of fifty, mostly dreadful yet always fun/ny games you can download for free complete with the mandatory digital watch.

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Lovely Mild Puzzling: Lisa

By Alice O'Connor on September 26th, 2014.

What a lovely day.

Wandering around Lisa is so pleasant that it almost seems a shame to solve the adventure game’s puzzles. On this grey London day, I had a lovely time wandering around its meadow, listening to the birds and the breeze, and tapping my toes to its music. And chasing the sheep. Sorry, sheep. It’s short, it’s free, and it’s delightful, which are three qualities I greatly appreciate on a Friday afternoon.

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Freeware Garden: What Could Possibly Go Wrong?

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on September 26th, 2014.

After countless portals accidentally leading to hell and scientific experiments gone armageddon, the characters of What Could Possibly Go Wrong? make a sensible decision: they make sure a marine with a big gun and plenty of cover is always present at each and every portal activation. That’s safety regulations for you, that is.

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Freeware Garden: Whiteout

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on September 25th, 2014.

With tiny splashes of red.

The Antarctic. Everyone loves the Antarctic and its built-in atmospheric vistas, amazing weather  effects and sense of unexplored mystery. It’s no accident it was the setting of choice for The Mountains of Madness, The Thing and now for the fresh and freeware Whiteout.

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Waggly Wandering: Explore An Alien City In Bernband

By Alice O'Connor on September 24th, 2014.

My new local.

I’m still pining for Prey 2, but Bernband has sated that desire a little. It’s a walking simulator set in an alien city, all stark architecture, colourful lights, and noise. Lots of noise. Trains roar past, flying cars zip overhead, machinery churns, and crowds all mutter and growl as you gawp at them. It’s a low-fi version of everything that excited me about Prey 2′s world, and you don’t even kill anyone. It’s out now, it’s free, and it has the most delightfully waggly first-person hand animation you’ve ever seen.

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Freeware Garden: Compact Conflict

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on September 24th, 2014.

It does admittedly look a bit like Risk and Defender of the Crown, but it's better than both.

Have been looking for a turn-based, strategic time-sink for quite some time, but I honestly never expected to find one crammed in the 13 kilobytes of the aptly named Compact Conflict. To say I’m loving this would be a criminal understatement, but, yes, I am honestly and deeply loving it.

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