Posts Tagged ‘graphics’

So Many Graphics: Epic Reveals Unreal Engine 4

By Nathan Grayson on May 18th, 2012.

A monstrous fiery hell demon, huh? If only someone would design a game around one of these.
Hey, you there. Yes, you! Do you have eyes? Do you enjoy looking at things? Well then, your precious peepers might’ve crossed paths with Epic’s Unreal Engine – for instance, in every game ever. Eyes, though, are perhaps the most treacherous of all face real estate tenants. They sight a new object of affection, cause your heart to palpitate and your mouth to transform into a sloppy stew of saliva, and then – five minutes later – it’s all old hat. Fortunately, then, there are always new graphics, as Epic explained…

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Why Not Relax With The Cryengine 2012 Graphics Trailer?

By Craig Pearson on March 9th, 2012.

Don't fear the noble fishman
Shhh. Deep breaths. In, hold it, HOLD IT, and out. Ah. Now you’ll feel like me. It might be because it’s Friday and I’m a bit tired, but I felt myself relaxing watching Crytek’s CryEngine 3 demonstration. I love graphics, because without them games are all words and stuff and you can’t shoot a word in the face, so I’m predisposed to start drooling over meaningless advances in tech and their associated sizzle videos. But this one, with the waves and the bizarre music, was like a tessellated pillow. I drifted away, barely noticing the noble fish thing until I realised the video has stopped playing half an hour ago. When I rewatched it: WTF? So: what the hell is that fish thing?
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Euclideon Say “Unlimited Detail” Is Not Dead

By Jim Rossignol on August 2nd, 2011.

Woo!
You might remember that a year ago we posted about the Unlimited Detail graphics engine, which is apparently based on a system called “point cloud data”, which is a step beyond polygon rendering into a miraculous world of infinite geometry. The claims caused quite a stir, but then the technology promptly vanished. The claims that it was vapourware all along are being addressed by a new video from the company behind the idea, Euclideon, in which they claim to be back, Back, BACK! And demonstrate it with a new video.

The new video zooms in to show individually-rendered grains of dirt. The claims get more astonishing from there.
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Travels Without A GeForce

By Alec Meer on June 2nd, 2008.

I’m a nightmare on holidays and press trips. Beforehand I’m plunged into panic – what if I get bored? However shall I cope with an idle moment? I suspect it’s a side-effect of that curiously modern condition Jim comments on – I spend so much of my every day so connected to this constant flow of information and entertainment that the idea of going without it for even a few hours is distressing.

So, on any trip, my hand-luggage is stuffed with more entertainment than I could possibly require – thee or four books, a magazine, an iPod heavy with music and video, a DS, a PSP and a laptop. Just barely enough to survive the flight – but what if it doesn’t get me through a week in a fascinating foreign city? For Chrissakes Meer, just go outside. What’s really ludicrous is that I don’t need this sack of technology. I just need the laptop.
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Team Fortress 2 Art Design

By Jim Rossignol on August 18th, 2007.

It’s worth taking a few minutes to watch this art-design trailer for Team Fortress 2. It references influences such as the phenomenon of increased recognition through caricatured silhouettes, as pioneered by early 20th century commercial illustration, and the background plates from Hayao Miyazaki animations. It gets a bit technical towards them end, but it gives you some idea about the layers of technology that are being artistically smoothed on to games like this. In videogames like TF2 art and science really do meet to give us the best of both worlds.

Team Fortress 2, like World Of Warcraft, isn’t going to age particularly quickly. Unlike games that reach for realistic visuals, these more abstract, stylised graphical themes do not lose much to the ongoing race for visual fidelity. The understand their visual systems, and are just fine with them, thankyouverymuch. Perhaps TF2 could even be a turning point for art design in PC gaming – proving that the tech developed in the last few years does not have to be put to use creating increasingly realistic people and worlds – because what really matters is character, personality, and easily comprehensible environments, and not a really life-like space-soldier.

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