Posts Tagged ‘Hide&Seek’

Of Mice And Gamepads: The Future Of Controllers

By Joel Goodwin on May 21st, 2014.

If I’m going to be dull and reductive about it, playing videogames works like this: we tell a game something through an input device – say, a gamepad, motion contoller, touch screen or keyboard – and get a response back in the form of images or sound. It’s like a conversation, but it’s shaped by the devices we use to talk. Without the Wiimote, there is no Wii Sports. Without the touch screen, there is no Fingle or Bloop.

If I don’t own the relevant controller, then I can’t play these games. But what if the controller doesn’t even exist? Many games are impossible to conceive of because we don’t have the hardware to act as muse. Are we living on a junk diet of gamepads and mice – or a rich land of controller plenty?

Let’s have a chat with a few developers and see wot what they think.

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Here Is A Natural Language James Bond Text Adventure

By Nathan Grayson on October 24th, 2012.

Now featuring a startling new videogame technology from the fuuuuture: occasional images!

The British Intelligence Officers Exam is technically an advergame. It’s also among the more authentic James Bond experiences I’ve ever had. Oh, and it’s a text adventure – a startlingly unique one, too. Then again, considering its pedigree – it heralds from Hide&Seek, the folks who put together this wild “playful experience” festival Kieron wrote about before he became a ghost – that’s not as shocking as you might think. In short, though, TBIOE doesn’t actually put you in direct control of a character. Instead, you converse with an agent in the field who’s attempting to accomplish any number of objectives – for instance, escaping from baddies with precious data in hand or tracking a notorious arms dealer. I even found myself paralyzed by a couple seriously tough non-black-and-white choices that actually made me think. The real magic of TBIOE, though, lies in its language. Its agents may not seem entirely human, but they do a pretty convincing impression most of the time.

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