Posts Tagged ‘interview’

Two Year Talk: Interviewing Planetside 2’s Creative Director

By Jim Rossignol on November 20th, 2014.

Planetside 2 is two years old today and still going strong. It’s a Planniversary, if you will.

Ahem. I’ve written a bunch about my time with the game, including this. Yes, I like it a lot. One person who has been at the forefront of that long campaign of making me like something for two whole years, and who was also implicated in the complex saga of development beforehand, is Matt Higby. He’s headed up the SOE team throughout the twenty-four months of the game being live, and still seems to have plenty of energy for the future of this peerless F2P shooter. With those two years in mind, I had a chat with him.

Read on below for a myriad of thoughts on the game that does a war of red, blue, and purple like no other.

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Second Gen Tank Shenanigans In Armored Warfare

By Philippa Warr on November 10th, 2014.

Probably an objective

“It’s not so much that we’re competing directly. We want to take things forward a bit for the genre and do the second generation type of this game.”

I’m speaking to Matt Festa, senior designer on Obsidian’s tank-based strategic shooter Armored Warfare about the differences between his game and – just to pluck an example out of the air – World Of Tanks.

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Interview: Katherine Bidwell On The Models Of Lumino City

By Philippa Warr on November 6th, 2014.

Waiting for the tiny band to show up

These are all photos I took at the exhibition – if you want to see the larger version just click on them.

“All our games so far have had some element of handmade-ness to them but Lumino City has gone to the nth degree.”

Katherine Bidwell, co-director of studio State of Play, is taking me round the GameCity exhibition of their Lumino City game models. If you’re not familiar with Lumino City you could be forgiven for thinking all of this card and wiring is entirely a marketing concept, bringing a digital creation into our physical world. Actually it’s the polar opposite. Lumino City was created as a sprawling fantastical architectural model in real life before being painstakingly converted into a digital gamespace.

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Blood Bowl 2 Interview: The Interface, Leagues, And DLC

By Jody Macgregor on November 3rd, 2014.

I blame Tolkien. He wrote Orcs like football hooligans and so Games Workshop’s idea of them actually playing football – albeit a version of American football where mutilations are encouraged – makes some sort of sense. The judgemental timer of Steam says I’ve played Blood Bowl more than a lot of other games in my library, more than plenty of games I play without having to complain about the interface, or the AI, or the fact you can’t turn the commentators off and turning their volume down banishes them only until you score a touchdown and then suddenly they’re back in your headphones and GRRR GORBAG SO CRANKY.

Blood Bowl is a game I love in spite of its flaws but find hard to recommend. Will Blood Bowl 2 remedy that? I spoke to Sylvain Sechi, project manager on Cyanide Studio’s Blood Bowl 2, to try to find out.

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A Chat About Interior Design In Games, With Ubi’s Dan Cox

By Philippa Warr on October 31st, 2014.

You can see the yellow and black markers if you peer closely

For no reason other than “We were at the same conference and his work sounded interesting” I ended up scheduling a meeting with Dan Cox. He focuses on level art at Ubisoft Toronto and his work has most recently appeared in Splinter Cell: Blacklist. He was in Paris to give a talk about interior design in games so it turned out he was more than happy to answer some of my questions about how artists make sense of spaces in video games*.

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Interview: Warzone Survival In This War Of Mine

By Philippa Warr on October 25th, 2014.

This War Of Mine instructions

“An experience of war seen from an entirely new angle”. That’s how 11 Bit Studios are pitching This War Of Mine. The new angle they’re referring to is the fact that, instead of being an action-packed military shooter, their warzone is a city under siege and requires you to keep a band of civilians alive. Its desire not to glorify war reminds me of Ubisoft’s recent Valiant Hearts but in terms of how the game works mechanically it’s closer to Zafehouse Diaries – a zombie survival game with a diary storytelling element. I spoke to the game’s senior writer to learn more.

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A Chat About Banner Saga-Powered Roguelike Bedlam

By Alec Meer on October 16th, 2014.

A couple of weeks ago, a roguelike which uses the Banner Saga engine to create a rather attractive post-apocalyptic cocktail of FTL, The Oregon Trail and XCOM popped up on Kickstarter. Bedlam’s around $90k into its $130k goal, with just eight days left on the clock. I’ve had a chat with the devs, who include veterans of Darksiders studio Vigil, about what they’re aiming for with the game, what the Banner Saga engine enables them to do, what they’ve changed about it, and the 80s/90s comics visual influences for this game of desert bandits and desert death-buses. Also – what about that other game called Bedlam?
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Skynet Versus Cthulhu: Human Resources

By Adam Smith on October 2nd, 2014.

Human Resources has one of the finest elevator pitches I’ve ever heard. The Singularity comes to pass, the machines rise, and humanity awakens a host of Lovecraftian horrors on the same day. It’s a tale of duelling apocalypses. Skynet vs Cthulhu, with humanity caught in the middle. The Kickstarter page has just gone live for Uber’s strategy followup to Planetary Annihilation, and I spoke to design director John Comes and art director Nate Simpson to learn about the end of everything.

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Interview: Agustin Cordes On Finding The Real Lovecraft

By Richard Cobbett on October 2nd, 2014.

Nobody ever mentions the Mad Monk Abdul Alhazred's habit of doodling in the margins. So many boobies.

Scratches, Serena and Asylum creator Agustin Cordes has just launched a Kickstarter for the first officially licensed H.P. Lovecraft game, The Case Of Charles Dexter Ward. Based on Lovecraft’s only full novel, it tells the tale of a young man in 1918 on a search for a wizard ancestor in Providence and Salem, with not a whiff of Cthulhu to be found. This project is intended to be faithful in a way that no other Lovecraftian game has been, but what exactly does that mean? And why do these old stories still have such a draw? I asked. He answered. Nice when things work out.

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Interview: Gearbox On Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel

By Paul Dean on September 30th, 2014.

With every new release, the Borderlands universe becomes increasingly ridiculous. It’s been happening for a while now, with the puns, the slapstick and the hidden pop culture references that pepper Borderlands 2 and further season its DLC. I’m hardly complaining, because I’ve gradually disengaged from the first-person shooter over the last few years, confronted again and again by far too many po-faced, monochrome military affairs. Borderlands 2 has been a welcome exception.

Like a sudden burst of ketchup from a thoroughly-spanked Heinz bottle, even more of that often unsubtle flavouring is set to season our PCs very soon. Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel comes out in two weeks. Developed in conjunction with 2K Australia, the Pre-Sequel is exactly what you’d expect from the series: more jokes, more cartoonish violence, more character diversity and a further expansion of a gun collection that would already make any Tom Clancy fan spurt like… well, like a sudden burst of ketchup from a thoroughly-spanked Heinz bottle.

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Jennifer Hale Interview: From Metal Gear To Mass Effect

By John Walker on September 28th, 2014.

The many faces that aren't the faces of Jennifer Hale.

Every Sunday, we reach deep into Rock, Paper, Shotgun’s 141-year history to pull out one of the the best moments from the archive. This week, John’s interview with voice actress Jennifer Hale. This post was originally published July 27, 2011.

Jennifer Hale has appeared in a great many more games than you probably realise. The person behind the voice of the female Shepard in all three Mass Effect games is also responsible for Metal Gear’s Naomi Hunter, SOCOM’s HQ, the spookily good British accent of KotOR’s Bastilla, and even the grunts and groans of Metroid Prime’s Samus, among literally hundreds of others in gaming, TV and film. We caught up with Jennifer as she drove through LA, to ask how she came to provide so many of gaming’s iconic voices, the combination of anonymity and fame, and which of the Commander Shepards she’s voting for to appear on Mass Effect’s cover.

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Interview: Victor Kislyi On Wargaming In A Single Breath

By Graham Smith on September 23rd, 2014.

I’ve interviewed a lot of CEOs over the past ten years, and while they each project the same unnatural, media-trained sangfroid, they’re each different, too.

Victor Kislyi, CEO of Wargaming, seems like one of the most genuine human beings I’ve seen in the role. His enthusiasm for his job is palpable. I asked him a single question at this year’s Gamescom and he spoke for nine minutes straight in response.

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Space Hulk Dev On What Went Right & Wrong, What’s Next

By Alec Meer on September 19th, 2014.

Space Hulk Space Hulk Space… Hulk? Full Control’s adaptation of the cult classic Games Workshop boardgame turned out to be a divisive experience after early excitement. A buggy launch (though rectified later) didn’t help, but players seemed polarized between enjoying its careful faithfulness and being put off by what some felt was too slow and rudimentary. Rab was very much in the latter camp when he covered it for us.

Last month, the Danish devs unexpectedly announced Space Hulk: Ascension edition, which has a looser, faster, flashier interpretation of the hallowed source material, including adding roleplaying mechanics, revised combat, different types of enemy, many more weapons and a slew of brand new missions. I talked to their lead Thomas Lund about the intent behind this deliberately more ‘videogamey’ standalone expansion, what’s changed both on the surface and deeper down, the critical differences between a boardgame and a videogame, why the two Space Hulks are companions rather than replacements, his response to criticism of the first game, why it had a messy launch and what they’ve learned from it all.
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