Posts Tagged ‘interview’

Freeware Garden: Mouse Corp

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on August 27th, 2014.

Nothing like a solid, cheery title pic to lure the masses in.

If you know and thus love what thecatamites have (has) been doing these past few years, chances are you have already downloaded Mouse Corp and are already defacing the graves of an impossibly colourful 3D world. A world filled with sentient vegetation and a wild menagerie of oddities you’ll have to traverse, quasi-RTS style, as three mice.

Now, I could go on all about the wild mechanics of Mouse Corp or its wondrously grotesque take on the Sonic universe, but I won’t. I will instead provide you with an interview featuring the wonderful Mr. Stephen Murphy — a.k.a. thecatamites:

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Interview: Luis Antonio Talks Twelve Minutes

By John Walker on August 14th, 2014.

We revealed Twelve Minutes this week – an extraordinarily interesting project, a game about a man trapped in a twelve minute time loop, trying to discover the reason why his wife is being accused of the murder of her father. And indeed why a policeman keeps kicking his head in. The game is already extremely impressive at its prototype phase, but creator Luis Antonio says there’s a lot more work to do. We spoke to Antonio about how he taught himself programming to be able to make this game, where he wants to take it, and how he’s not planning on releasing an early access version of the game.

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Interview: Early Access, Stealth And Mods In Invisible, Inc.

By Graham Smith on August 8th, 2014.

Invisible, Inc. is coming to Steam Early Access on August 19th. It’s developer Klei’s return to stealth after 2012’s Mark of the Ninja, but this time it’s turn-based, tactical, and about steering a team of operatives through a Syndicate-inspired world of corporate espionage. It’s also their return to procedural generation and permadeath after 2013’s vastly successful Burtonesque survival game, Don’t Starve.

I spoke to company founder and programmer Jamie Cheng about why they came back to stealth game design, the challenges of procedureal generation, the right way to do Early Access, and mods.

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Wasteland 2: Fargo On NPCs, DLC & Save-Scumming

By Alec Meer on August 5th, 2014.

When I sat down for a chat with Wasteland 2’s Brian Fargo (he of Interplay as-was, and now of InXile as-is), it wasn’t yet known that the Kickstarted alterna-Fallout RPG was to have its release date moved from August to September. Hence, I didn’t ask him about that. But we did talk about the state the game’s in now, what post-release plans are, sneaking recordings of his revivalist preacher granddad onto the soundtrack, mysterious NPCs, butterfly effect consequences and the importance of continuity.
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Expert Speech Skill: Pillars Of Eternity Interview Part 2

By Adam Smith on July 29th, 2014.

In the second and final part of a conversation with Josh Sawyer of Obsidian (part one), we discuss how the design of Pillars of Eternity differs from Fallout: New Vegas. That involves a discussion of New Vegas’ post-release support, official and otherwise, and the pros and cons of traditional RPG systems. Of particular note – why Pillars of Eternity does not have a Speech skill, or any other skill of that sort.

With contributions from executive producer Brandon Adler, we also discuss the role of Paradox as publisher and the benefits of digital distribution, and end with a tribute to nineties RPG, Darklands.

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Freedom And Fantasy: Pillars Of Eternity Interview

By Adam Smith on July 24th, 2014.

Pillars of Eternity was, briefly, gaming’s most successful Kickstarter, at least in terms of funds raised. Like many crowdfunded games, particularly in the early days, it’s a project driven partly by nostalgia. A party-based fantasy RPG in the style of Baldur’s Gate and the other Infinity Engine D&D games, it has a strong heritage to live up to. Obsidian’s Josh Sawyer is the director of the game and I spoke to him late last week about theology, flagellant monks, freedom from licensing and respecting player’s choices. We also talked about his desire to make a historical RPG and his previous work, particularly the design of Fallout: New Vegas.

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Braben On Star Citizen, Elite 2 Bugs & Rude Planet Names

By Alec Meer on July 24th, 2014.

A short while ago I ran the first part of my recent interview with Elite co-creator David Braben about space, VR and other Dangerous-related topics; here’s part two, in which I mutter questions from RPS readers at him, on topics ranging from Wallace and Gromit to obscure Elite 2 bugs, before posing my own questions about his take on Star Citizen, and exactly who all these people throwing shedloads of money at space games are.
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The Flare Path: John Tiller, Boredom Killer

By Tim Stone on July 18th, 2014.

Today in FP I question a man who has been testing, besting, and interesting PC wargamers for nigh-on twenty years. In my imagination, the legendary John Tiller lives in a hexagonal mansion/pillbox atop a hexagonal hill in Hexham, Northumberland. He never drives anywhere without first checking which hexes are visible from his destination, and setting aside sufficient Action Points for unloading. Read on to discover just how accurate my mental picture is for pithy personal reflections from one of wargaming’s most popular and prolific designers. Read the rest of this entry »

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Braben On Elite, Oc Rift, Dodgy Gravity & Doing Space Right

By Alec Meer on July 16th, 2014.

At last week’s Develop conference in Brighton, I grabbed a half hour with Frontier Developments boss David Braben to talk about what’s going on with Elite Dangerous (fresh from my own wide-eyed experiences of it on a VR headset). Discussed: space, Oculus Rift, why FIFA games don’t sound right, how Star Trek doesn’t talk about gravity, developing in the public eye and publisher-free, and the resurgence of joysticks.
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Red Sky At Night: Tale Of Tales On Sunset

By Richard Cobbett on July 14th, 2014.

'Another good day for shepherds then,' sighed Angela.

Sunset is the latest game/project from Tale of Tales, creators of Lego Star Wars The Wolf Among Us many artistically minded offerings like The Path and Fatale. It’s already doubled its Kickstarter goal with its promise of a very different perspective on war; not a man with a gun in the field or some faceless general, but a woman with a feather duster in a luxurious apartment, given one hour a day to both make things tidy and make a difference. I spoke to creators Auriea Harvey and Michaël Samyn to find out more about their subversive take on modern warfare, and the challenges of making a very different kind of experience to their usual projects.

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How Epic Hopes To Avoid Pay-To-Win With Fortnite

By Nathan Grayson on July 9th, 2014.

Fortnite is, technically speaking, Epic’s first free-to-play game. The crayola colored smash-and-shoot-and-loot-and-build-er is being designed primarily as a co-op thing, but with persistent MMO-style progression underlying it all. There’s also still-nascent PVP in the works, further necessitating balance in the name of fair fun. Fortnite is, however, a giant mixed bag of moving parts, multiple genres (action, building, crafting, a Gears-of-War-style horde mode, etc) mashed together. How do you make all of that free-to-play without mucking it up?

I asked producer Roger Collum about Epic’s plans, influences from games like League of Legends and Team Fortress 2, the potential emergence of a tedious grind with things like XP boosters in the mix, whether or not you can really equate time and money as free-to-play devs so often do, and more. It’s all below.

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A Mysterious State Of Mind: Virginia Interview

By Adam Smith on July 8th, 2014.

Virginia set up camp in our collective consciousness the moment we saw its stylish agents and what looked like a small town diner. Inspired by Twin Peaks, The Outer Limits and The X-Files, it’s a game about the investigation into a missing person case in one of America’s first States. This is an America in touch with its fictional history as well as its actual past, and I wanted to know more about how those influences will sit together, and how the game would actually play. I also took the opportunity to ask the team about a few of their favourite things. The team are designer/writer Jonathan Burroughs, animator/artist Terry Kenny and composer Lyndon Holland. Here are their answers.

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Ubisoft On Far Cry 4’s Story, Box Art, Team Diversity

By Nathan Grayson on July 1st, 2014.

Far Cry 3 was a lot of things, but a narrative tour de force wasn’t exactly one of them. To hear Far Cry 3 writer Jeffrey Yohalem tell it, there were good intentions putting the wind beneath its hang gliders, the komodo (and/or blood) in its dragons, but the end result was rather… misguided. When Far Cry 4 was first announced, it seemed like it might be off to a similarly shaky start with box art that left some feeling uncomfortable, but the E3 game demo ended up telling a different tale.

That said, we still don’t know much about this one is about, so I sat down with Far Cry 4 narrative director Mark Thompson to talk premise, plot, controversy, the inherent problems of videogame info hype cycles, and heaps more. Machete your way past the break for the full thing.

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