Posts Tagged ‘Jack King-Spooner’

Caledonian Antisyzygy: Beeswing Is Now Available

By Cara Ellison on December 13th, 2014.

I haven’t been back to Scotland, my motherland, for a long time. Beeswing is a game about small-town Scotland released a few days ago. It is written in snippets of philosophy and folklore. It is told through hand-drawn maps and gentle guitar strokes. It is Final Fantasy on a small scale, in the spirit of Yumei Nikki, hand-illustrated and studded with the kind of Scottish duality people don’t talk about any more. In Beeswing I feel acquainted with death, but not in a morbid way. In Beeswing I feel like I am home in summers of Loch Lomond watching bees suckle pink flowers and dance between the heads of heather. I wanted to call my mother at a point, in fact, a thing I forget to do but Beeswing tattooed it into my consciousness. Beeswing sent me home.

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On Beeswing, Joy In Death, And The ‘Grandma Money Shot’

By Nathan Grayson on November 17th, 2013.

Beeswing is a peculiar game. It’s a Zelda and Earthbound-inspired RPG without combat, a personal game that’s absolutely not about its creator, and a rumination on the nature of death that’s not swollen with tearful woe. Also, it’s made out of paint and clay and stuff. The successfully funded (though still on Kickstarter for about five more seconds) project from Sluggish MorssBlues For Mittavinda, and Will You Ever Return creator Jack King-Spooner aims to tell the hundreds of intertwining stories that make up King-Spooner’s hometown of Beeswing, Scotland. Some stories will raise questions. Some will answer them. Others won’t, preferring instead that you fill in the blanks. I spoke with King-Spooner about his love of death, the need for sincerity in an era of cynical irony, and how he’s, er, “money-shotting” his grandmother’s death in Beeswing.

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Beeswing Is A Handcrafted, Earthbound-Inspired Mini-Epic

By Nathan Grayson on October 21st, 2013.

Although maybe un-epic would be a better descriptor. Beeswing is the latest labor of love and ceaselessly wonderful oddity from gaming’s most thoughtful madman, Jack King-Spooner. Previously, his mighty brain egg hatched to unleash the likes of Sluggish Morss, Blues For Mittavinda, Will You Ever Return, and a portion of Experiment 12 upon an unsuspecting populace. I honestly do not believe there’s anyone else out there who makes games like his. I mean, Blues For Mittavinda had me physically (in real life) meditate, for goodness sake. It was both a total trip and a contemplative journey, a soothing exploration of just how normal absolute strangeness can be. And now King-Spooner’s looking to extend that sensibility to a semi-autobiographical Earthbound and Zelda-inspired exploration RPG in Beeswing. This is very good news.

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Wot I Think: Experiment 12

By Nathan Grayson on July 29th, 2013.

Terry Cavanagh. Jasper Byrne. Ian Snyder. Jack King-Spooner. Richard Perrin. Zaratustra. Michael Brough. Robert Yang. Alan Hazelden. Benn Powell. Jake Clover. TheBlackMask.

You have probably played games by all of these people. VVVVVV might ring a bell. Maybe Lone Survivor or Kairo. Or, if you’re really, really cool, Blues For Mittavinda. Etc, etc, etc. You get the idea. But now they’ve all congealed into a hivemind and made one giant, multi-stage/setting/genre melting pot of madness. Each developer had three days to make a contribution, and then the next creator picked up where the previous left off. Experiment 12 is insane. Experiment 12 is inconsistent. Experiment 12 is beautiful.

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Blues For Mittavinda Is A Gloriously Odd Odyssey

By Nathan Grayson on March 14th, 2013.

Despite appearances, the game actually doesn't take place across a series of pieces of concept art from Torment: Tides of Numenera.

Blues For Mittavinda is the latest globule of congealed insanity from the brilliance factory between Jack King-Spooner’s ears. Unsurprisingly, given his prior work on Sluggish Morss: A Delicate Time in History (which Porpentine rightly aimed an adoration missile at hereabouts), it’s quite weird. This time around, however, it’s a more restrained, methodical madness – the kind that takes a moment to sit down, breathe, and revel in the truly bizarre nature of our most basic, life-sustaining habits. The backdrop’s gloriously realized, too, sewing its yarn of inevitability into the very fabric of down-home Wild West Americana. All of which is quite impressive, given that King-Spooner put it together in just over a week for the recent Gamejolt competition. Mostly spoiler-free impressions after the break.

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