Posts Tagged ‘Ken-Levine’

Making Of: Freedom Force

By Kieron Gillen on November 30th, 2007.

[Considering Mr Levine’s turned up in the rumour mill today, I thought turning an eye back at one of Irrational’s other games would be a worthy endeavour. This interview with Ken was done in the run up to the second Freedom Force game.]

MAN BOT!

“We had a lot of internal arguments at the time. Some people wanted it more dark and gritty, and others preferred it in a lighter style,” recalls Irrational head-honcho Ken Levine, “I remember waking up in the middle of the night, before we shipped and going “What did I do? Why did I go and make it so it was retro? What was I thinking?””. Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

21 Comments »

Filthy Rumourmongering: Bioshock 2 sans Ken?

By Alec Meer on November 30th, 2007.

“A good chunk of the BioShock team did not want to work with Ken [Levine] ever again, and 2K definitely understood the sentiment and let them set up a new studio so that they can make Bioshock 2, leaving Ken with Project X. A good chunk of the other senior 2K Boston people who were sick of Ken but didn’t move to San Francisco ended up scattering to other AAA developers instead. In Quincy, they’re essentially rebuilding a team from almost scratch again.”

So claims generally reliable industry insider Surfer Girl, based on her own insider tip-off. ‘Project X’, incidentally, is the upcoming X-COM remake, a game I’m personally desperate to hear more details of. But the Bioshock stuff’s depressing if true. Read the rest of this entry »

, , .

56 Comments »

Bioshockier and Bioshockier

By Kieron Gillen on October 18th, 2007.

I'm drunk on the floor again, yeah?.

Still-Irrational-To-Us’ Ken Levine has been talking to America’s Games For Windows about possible downloadable content for Bioshock. 1UP have only lobbed up a couple of teaser quotes. Here’s the big one…

“Diablo II, to me, was a great model for an expansion, because it enhanced the original game, but also extended the game, too. I’m not a really big fan of expanding things just by linearly adding to the experience, adding a new campaign, as much as I am of enhancing the original experience and adding replayability to that experience,” said Levine in a post-release interview in the latest issue of Games for Windows Magazine. “I think that certainly BioShock’s combat experience is great, but it could be broader. I’m a little more confused as far as how to expand the narrative experience.”

They also reference the Plasmids that were cut from the game as possible extras. May RPS also remember the other Big Daddies that disappeared in the development route, and suspect that introducing new Splicers would be a welcome addition to Rapture’s ecosystem of Biff.

Anyone got any other ideas for extra content they’d like to see?

, , , .

26 Comments »

Levine: “…opposed to multiple endings”

By Kieron Gillen on October 5th, 2007.

Okay, this is intriguing. Gamespot have done a large interview with Ken Levine of The-artists-previously-known-as-Irrational about Bioshock. In it, he’s getting grilled about a number of issues to do with the whole what the game means thing. One of them gets an interesting response – regarding the fact the game, after all this complexity, the endings are a harsh Manichean dichotomy (i.e. You’re either Jesus or Mr UltraBastard of Shitsville). He admits that it was never his intention, and the request came from “somebody up the food chain from me”. Later, he elaborates…

“One of the reasons I was opposed to multiple endings is I never want to do things that have multiple digital outcomes, versus analog outcomes. I want to do it like the weapons system in the combat in BioShock. There are a million different things you can do in every combat; you can play it a million different ways. Looking into the future for the franchise, that’s something I want to [figure out], that by the time you get to the ending of that choice path, you have a sense of your impact on the world through lots of little permutations rather than like a giant ending piece, if you follow my meaning.

And I think we did a reasonably good job with [the endings], but there are just two of them. And this is not a game about A and B. This is a game about one through 1 million, and all those permutations of choice. And as I think about the future of the franchise, that’s where I want to take that.”

There’s lots more in the interview, including some impressions of the way his thoughts are going for the inevitable sequels. Especially worthwhile is his final statement where he notes “If the sales success of BioShock means anything, it means that we can trust our audience a little more”. And Amen to that.

, , .

12 Comments »

To Err is Human. To forgive, Levine.

By Kieron Gillen on September 4th, 2007.

I’m not sure what I was trying to do with that title.

In the big ol’ interview with Ken Levine which we launched the site with, I mentioned that other bits of the transcript found homes elsewhere. The biggest chunk of it has emerged, as PC Gamer republishes online my interview with Levine which is in their current print edition. It deals with controversy, developers reflecting culture, the price of a legacy and a splash of Randian philosophy. And here’s a quote.

“If you look at the ’60s, you’ll see Vietnam movies like John Wayne’s Green Beret being made. And you go to the ’70s, you have Apocalypse Now. From this ultra-patriotic unquestioning thing, we’re moving to a stage where games are getting mature enough to reflect the zeitgeist a little. BioShock is reflecting the confusion I have.”

The rest is here. Consume essential information. Consume!

, , .

1 Comment »

Rapture, unwrapped

By Kieron Gillen on August 31st, 2007.

Okay, there’s obviously a lot still being said about in the gaming space about Bioshock. Being a crazed obsessive, I’m still reading most of it. But, if you have to read one thing after completing Bioshock, this is the one. It’s Chris Remo’s extensive interview with Ken Levine, which goes through all the elements of the game and is pretty damn good. And let’s have a non-spoilery aggressive quote, eh?

“Honestly, any writer could write a 20-minute cutscene. I hate those as a gamer. I skip them. Those games, I don’t know what the hell is going on. I’m not going to sit through those. But in Half-Life, I know everything that’s going on. That was a big inspiration. I know more about City 17 than I know about any Final Fantasy world.

Even a great game like Okami, it has 20 minutes of “blah blah blah” and I just want to kill myself. It’s not fair to our medium, it’s so self-indulgent. I think we have to work harder. Trust me, it’s a lot harder to do what we did in BioShock than to do a 20-minute cutscene. I could write that stuff all day long.

For God’s sake, don’t read until you’ve finished the game. For God’s sake, do read it when you’ve finished the game.

, .

15 Comments »

Rapture’s Required Reading

By Kieron Gillen on August 22nd, 2007.

I love things like this. I’ve got into some of my favourite things via creators of things I’ve loved recommending them – following the trails to interesting places. Because if they’ve inspired something you’ve loved, they’ve got to be pretty good, yeah? That thought process has lead me to everything from Vonnegut to the Buzzcocks to Nethack.

Anyway, Gametap asked Ken Levine for his list of works which kept the Irrational team’s creative engines fully stoked up. For example…

Animal Farm: (Book, 1945)
“You really only need to read this one book to understand power and what it does to people; it’s the ultimate story of what happens when ideals slam into less than ideal people.”

Miller’s Crossing (Film, 1990)
“My favorite film of all time. It’s all dialogue, style, and more interconnected plot threads than you can possibly comprehend in one viewing; probably why I’ve seen it 20 times. A huge inspiration when trying to create the slang and language tonality of the city of Rapture.”

More in the full article including the music-inspiring Sweet and Lowdown, the Rand double-combo of The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged, the entire city of New York and Gilliam’s retro-sci-fi opus Brazil (For the record, which is in at least half of RPS’ staffs’ top 5 films ever).

, , , , , , , .

6 Comments »

Levine meets Objectivists

By Kieron Gillen on August 21st, 2007.

This is an odd one. I haven’t seen it linked in any of the other blogs – it’s possible I just haven’t been paying attention to the right places though – but I found it when researching something.

(That is, entering random Bioshock related phrases into google.)

Basically, Andrew Russel, an objectivist gentleman drops Mr Levine an e-mail. And Mr Levine replies, and talks candidly about his beliefs regarding objectivism and world politics and hints at his intentions with Bioshock. And then Andrew posts the replies to the objectivist forums he frequents. To briefly set the stage – and it’s worth doing so, as in the UK, Objectivism and Ayn Rand are a lot less known than they are in the States – Bioshock’s setting of the isolated city of genius founded by one Andrew Ryan is clearly a riff off Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged, and not necessarily a complimentary one. You may have seen Objectvists turn up in some Bioshock comments threads, voicing concerns (at best) and voicing anger (at worst).

As Andrew puts it…

What I am hoping is that BioShock treats the theory of individualism with proper respect. It would be very disheartening if BioShock were to equate individualism with an endless desire to prove oneself superior to others (this being a form of conformist parasitism Rand referred to as Second-Handing), free-market capitalism with making profit as an end-in-itself, or advocate the fallacious notion that laissez-faire is a zero-sum game. As you are obviously aware, Objectivism is often assumed to be wrong, evil, or an engine of societal collapse and disintegration, regardless of the historical evidence in favor of many Objectivist-approved principles.

Ken replies at length, but a couple of bits stick out. Firstly answering Andrew’s questions regarding Shock 2…

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , .

7 Comments »

Exclusive: Ken Levine on the making of Bioshock

By Kieron Gillen on August 20th, 2007.

When Ken Levine, the main man behind Bioshock and System Shock 2, drops you a line asking if you want to do an interview, you say “yes.”

Levine’s a fascinating figure – articulate, driven, passionate. And, no, I don’t want to have sex with him. (Denial’s not pretty – Ed) It’s worth stressing how this interview came about. Levine – a major developer – mailed me for no other reason than that he wanted to talk. No-one does that. He’s played the PR machine on Bioshock enormously hard, clearly very aware of the enormous stakes he’s playing for. And he is, in a real, fundamental way. Levine sold the company he co-founded in order to get this game done. Irrational no longer exist in name thanks to selling it to 2K, but without their money Bioshock wouldn’t have been made in a recognisable way. It was only possible because of the Faustian deal, and he needs to make the best of it. It has to do what none of its peers and precursors (The Thiefs, The System Shocks, The Deus Exes) have done – become not just a hit, but a enormous HIT. If Bioshock does anything short of changing our world, he’s failed.

So, yes, he likes to talk. As he should.

Anyway – Bits of the interview end up being cannibalised for features in PC Gamer UK, Wired and Edge. If they come online, clearly, I’ll be linking to them – the PC Gamer one has lots of stuff on designers’ ethics and needs, while the Edge one is a making-of look at System Shock 2 (The Wired one’s up now, and you’ve just wandered past its link. And I’ve edited the PCG one in now too – Ed). However, even with all that, there were still several thousand words of interesting material left spare. In the days leading up to Bioshock’s release, Rock Paper Shotgun seems the perfect place to share them. I’ve included narrative bridges for the bits which have gone into the other pieces to give context. Oh – and this feature was written before I’d played the finished game, having only experienced the first couple of levels in preview.

We start at a fairly obvious point, but I was fishing for quotes for the more general-readership Wired feature. Bear with us, and read on for Ken’s thoughts on the legacy of System Shock, how Little Sisters were formerly insects, the nature of superheroes, objectivism and, of course, much more.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , .

25 Comments »

Ken Levine: Stop paying attention to my game!

By Kieron Gillen on August 18th, 2007.

For a week anyway.

Artist-formally-known-as-Irrational’s Ken Levine posts to Through The Looking Glass’ Bioshock forum with some instructions.

“If you’re going to buy the game this week, I highly recommend you stay away from any forums that might have spoilers until you play the game through. Our goal in making the game was to thrill and, often, surprise you.

Please don’t ruin other people’s experience by revealing secrets in unmarked threads, and if you want to enjoy the game to its fullest, stay away from any threads that might ruin the fun for you. With a game like BioShock, it will really make a difference.”

I’ll echo his words. I’m a bit over half-way Bioshock at the moment, and there’s certain reveals which you really want to play out as they’ve crafted them. The one which I’ve just hit is as powerful as any plot-beat I’ve experience in gaming, I think. And that’s all you’ll get out of me from now.

Oh yeah – if you’re a XBox gamer, be careful with even reading friends profiles. Plot elements turn up in some of the achievements.

Oh – and while on the topic: THERE IS NO TYLER DURDEN.

, , , .

1 Comment »

In Rapture

By Kieron Gillen on August 9th, 2007.

OMFG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I COULD JUST DIE!!!!! MY BRAIN IS BIOSHOCK SOUP!

Bioshock’s Gold.

(Thanks to Bluesnews.)

, , , .

2 Comments »