Posts Tagged ‘kickstater’

Mechagodzilla ‘Em Up: Kerberos Crowdfunding Kaiju-a-Gogo

By Alice O'Connor on May 13th, 2014.

With a purposeful grimace and a terrible sound, he pulls the spitting high tension wires down

As someone involved a bit with playful live events, my dream project is a Godzilla-esque model city installation. I want to fill a room with city for people to interact with as they see fit, wandering through its streets, admiring the handicraft, sitting down and chillaxing in the park, or perhaps stomping it down to the ground while roaring. Kaiju-a-Gogo is more focused on that last part.

Sword of the Stars devs Kerberos Productions are coming down to Earth with a smashy strategy game about taking over the world by crushing cities, armies, governments, and giant robots with a honking great customisable kaiju. If that sounds like your bag, you can back it on Kickstarter.

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Maia Maker On Molyneux, Marmite & Management Games

By Alec Meer on November 23rd, 2012.

Peter Molyneux’s unnervingly vague but tear-jerking Project GODUS isn’t the only god game revival on the crowd-funded block. British indie dev Simon Roth is in the last mile of seeking pledges for his sci-fi-themed, Dungeon Keeper and Dwarf Fortress-inspired, procedurally-generated management game Maia. Between its rather spangly proprietary engine and the fact that there’s a whole lot of it being shown off already, I’m personally much more interested in this modernised, maximised rethink of the house that Bullfrog made than I am in the wild promises of Dungeon Keeper’s oft-disproved original lead.

With £63,000 of the required £100,000 in the bag and just four days left on the Kick-clock, it’s looking likely that Maia will go down to the wire. I chatted to the game’s lead, Simon Roth (ex of Frontier and Mode 7) about whether he thinks he’ll make it, the game’s procedural cleverness, his 70s sci-fi inspirations, why god games declined and, opportunist that I am, what he makes of Molyneux’s accidental rival project.
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