Posts Tagged ‘Looking Glass’

Is Deus Ex Still The Best Game Ever? The Conclusion

By John Walker on April 29th, 2015.

This took rather longer than we thought. But after five entries, and two weeks, I’ve come to my conclusions. You can read the whole saga here, if you’ve not yet caught up, as I chronicle my experience of replaying Deus Ex – a game I’ve always maintained is the Best Game Ever – fifteen years later. Was I wrong? Is it even possible for me to be wrong? Read on.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , , , .

119 Comments »

Is Deus Ex Still The Best Game Ever?
Part Five: Living, Playing, Ending

By John Walker on April 23rd, 2015.

My chronicle of returning to Deus Ex fifteen years later, to see if I’m right when I tell anyone who comes near that it’s the best game ever, is nearing its end. You can read the whole saga here.

In this fifth part I contemplate the significant change in approach in the last third of the game, and then make my choice for the ending.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , , , .

69 Comments »

Is Deus Ex Still The Best Game Ever?
Part Four: Fratricide, Gratified And Dissatisfied

By John Walker on April 21st, 2015.

And so continues my chronicle of returning to Deus Ex fifteen years later, to see if I’m right when I tell anyone who comes near that it’s the best game ever. You can read the whole saga here.

In this fourth edition, I once more fail to save my brother, become increasingly frustrated with the limits of the game’s intelligence, and ponder whether real choice is actually usefully conveyed to the player.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , , , .

84 Comments »

Is Deus Ex Still The Best Game Ever?
Part Three: Wrongfully Accused

By John Walker on April 16th, 2015.

As my re-exploration of Deus Ex continues, I find my memories clashing with the reality of the game, as I try to establish if it’s still the Best Game Ever™. You can read the whole saga here. It’s accusing me of crimes I didn’t commit, an in turn, I start committing some crimes.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , , , .

97 Comments »

Is Deus Ex Still The Best Game Ever?
Part Two: Struggles, Buggles and Reading Huggles

By John Walker on April 15th, 2015.

Here continues my attempt to discover if Deus Ex really is the best game ever, like my brain thinks. Part One is here. Today I yet again struggle to get the game working, then struggle to work within the game. But cheer myself up reading some newspapers.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , , , .

161 Comments »

Is Deus Ex Still The Best Game Ever?
Part One: Memories And Hardware Renderers

By John Walker on April 13th, 2015.

When asked, “What is the best game ever?” I always give one reply. “Deus Ex.” Back in the days when my passport still allowed me into PC Gamer Top 100 meetings, I would furiously argue that it should be no. 1, and indeed become furious whenever it did not. While I may pick another name if asked for my favourite game, when it comes to “best”, I always say Looking Glass/Ion Storm’s greatest moment.

But what if I’m wrong?

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , , , .

198 Comments »

Looking Glass / Irrational Does System Shock 2 Live

By Alec Meer on February 26th, 2015.

Even a few years ago, the idea of getting to watch assorted Looking Glass and Irrational alumni play and talk through revered sci-fi immersive sim System Shock 2 sounded like an absurd fantasy. Twitch and Twitter, whatever else they might be throwing at the world, have broken down so many barriers. For instance: two of hours of System Shock 2, with live commentary provided by the likes of BioShock’s Ken Levine, Gone Home’s Steve Gaynor and Ultima Underworld’s Paul Neurath (not to mention all the other landmark games those guys worked on).
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , .

16 Comments »

Sharper Shadows: Thief Gold HD Mod Released

By Adam Smith on December 11th, 2013.

Here at the RPS retirement home for weary writers, our memories are often akin to a swirling sea of confusion. Just yesterday, I was watching the trailer for Peggle 2 and thought it looked terrible. I realised that Peggle the first has come to resemble a Jackson Pollock gallery retrospective in my mind’s eye. How strange then that our collective memories of Thief were lucid and strong. Looking Glass’ masterpiece is more than a memory though. Astonishingly, fifteen years after its release, the fan community has continued to work on the game and a modder going by the handle Bentraxx has released a Thief Gold HD Mod. It looks gorgeous and there’s a full changelist and video below.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , .

32 Comments »

Inside At Last: Thief Is Fifteen Today

By RPS on November 30th, 2013.

Fifteen years ago to the day, with some variance depending on where in the world you lived at the time, Thief: The Dark Project, went on sale. It is one of the games that continues to define the possibilities of first-person architecture and also an example of interactive storytelling that has endured over a decade and a half without being fully tapped. Some of the lessons that the team at Looking Glass laid out in their masterpiece has influenced a great deal of gaming. Other parts, like the Thief himself, appear to have gone unnoticed. Here, we remember and celebrate the brilliance of The Dark Project.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

87 Comments »

Interview: Spector On Fears, Legacies and Returning To PC

By Adam Smith on November 18th, 2013.

There are a lot of words being written about the new consoles this week but when I spoke to Warren Spector a few days ago, he was clear about where his future lies: “I think all the interesting stuff is happening on PC now… Assuming I make more games, which I intend to do, PC and Mac are going to be my targets.”

It’s good to hear. We spoke at the Bradford Animation Festival and covered a wide range of topics, from his theories of design and pioneering role in PC gaming to thoughts on the current state of the industry. In this first part of our conversation, there’s insight into how Spector see his own legacy and the work of his former colleagues, and how frustrations with Thief’s difficulty inspired the player empowerment of Deus Ex.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , , , , , .

64 Comments »

Stealing History: Dark Camelot And Thief

By RPS on August 5th, 2013.


With Thief 4 bearing down on us like a robber with a toothy smile, we thought it might be interesting to go back to where stealth began: the creation of Thief. Joe Martin stole away with this report.

There’s a line I had wanted start this article with. It is a line from the ironic finale of The Neverending Story and it would have been an obscure reference to the fact that before it was The Dark Project, Thief was originally called Dark Camelot. It was: “Beginnings are always dark”.

I can’t use that line, however, because if you go far back enough you eventually uncover Thief’s beginning wasn’t dark at all. It was red.
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

52 Comments »

Through The Looking Glass: Paul Neurath Interviewed

By Cara Ellison on March 11th, 2013.

System Shock 2 AAAAH my CDs

“When the history of my glory is written, your species shall only be a footnote to my magnificence,” said a terrifying lady, yesterday, to me. Or SHODAN did or whatever. But her legacy lives on thanks to the kind of innovation Looking Glass studios was interested in. Paul Neurath, the co-founder and creative director of Looking Glass from ‘the day it opened to the day it closed’ has been interviewed on this super fascinating podcast looking back on his time with the studio. The company was responsible for some of our dearest memories, such as Ultima Underworld, System Shock, and Thief, before it closed its doors (sob!) in 2000.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

43 Comments »

Buying Old Games: Where Your Money Goes

By Alec Meer on February 6th, 2012.

Raaaaaaaage indeed, Mr Horny

Edit: cos there are various theories flying around below about my perceived intent in posting this, I shall clarify my own feelings. I would really like to see contracts between publishers and developers more commonly include an arrangement whereby key (and ideally, but rather less plausibly, all) creatives on game projects continue to see some post-release royalties, as is the case in some other entertainment and publishing industries. That so many old games are being (apparently profitably) rereleased lately highlights this disparity. That is all.

There’s obviously a very good chance you already know this, but just in case: when a developer is bought out by a publisher, it’s usually the case that they then don’t see any ongoing royalties from the games they make for them, or indeed for any existing intellectual property that was swallowed up as part of the studio acquisition. It’s standard practice, knowingly agreed by both parties during the dark deal some studios made to ensure immediate financial viability and larger project budgets. But what it does mean is that a great many of the PC games we regularly celebrate around these parts are no longer bringing in any money for their creators, despite still being on sale. Whenever we excitedly see an old classic appear on Steam or GoG (such as Thief last week), chances are very high that whatever we pay for it goes purely to the publisher and the download service. And while it may well be right that these bodies profit from projects they funded and distribute, it’s sad that the men and women who toiled over that game’s creation won’t see another penny from it.
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

177 Comments »