Posts Tagged ‘myst’

Gouraud Shading In The Myst: Myst Remake Gets Remade

By Alec Meer on February 7th, 2014.

Do games still use gouraud shading? Probably not, but it’s the only relevant word I could think of that sounded even slightly like ‘gorillas’. Myst is ancient source of division amongst PC gamers, and also one that’s never quite managed to go away. Remade in 2000 as both Myst: Masterpiece Edition and realMyst, with any number of ports and sequels and spin-offs since then, it’s now back again again as realMyst: Masterpiece Edition.

There’s still no sign of a Pyst remake, however.
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Total Recall: A Chat With Stephan Martiniere

By Duncan Harris on February 5th, 2014.


This is the latest in the series of articles about the art technology of games, in collaboration with the particularly handsome Dead End Thrills.

With the galaxy’s biggest sci-fi movies using ever more effects houses and artists, it can be hard to pinpoint today’s Ralph McQuarries and Ron Cobbs. They’re out there, though, often known more by work than name. At the top of the pile is Stephan Martiniere, one of those illustrators and art directors whose work is so envied by just about any sci-fi project going that’s he levelled up to ‘Visionary’. Put simply, people want the stuff in his head on their books, in their movies, at their theme parks, and, as luck would have it, in their games.

Examples? In movies, Martiniere’s applied his signature style (eye-popping ‘Golden Age’ snapshots of civilisations in overdrive) to the worlds of I, Robot, Tron: Legacy, Star Wars Episodes II and III, Star Trek, The Fifth Element, the Total Recall remake, 300: Rise Of An Empire, Guardians Of The Galaxy and The Avengers: Age Of Ultron. *and breathe…* Read the rest of this entry »

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Myst Creator’s Obduction Obducts $1.1m From Wallets

By Nathan Grayson on November 14th, 2013.

Myst and Riven developer Cyan still hasn’t offered much in the way of substantial content (beyond a few largely vague “here’s what we’re hoping to do” descriptions) for exploration puzzler Obduction, but that hasn’t stopped it from beaming up enough money to begin chewing up and spitting its strange, globular gumball world onto our desks in earnest. The game’s Kickstarter was originally seeking $1.1m, and now it’s meandered past that mark. Go below for details on what happens next and a very silly celebration video.

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Ages Beyond Uru: Cyan’s Myst Successor On Kickstarter

By Nathan Grayson on October 18th, 2013.

Witness the majesty and grace of the twin gumball moons orbiting chewed-up-and-spat-out gum world. Look at those soaring mounds, still wet with stringy saliva. Ah, such natural beauty.

It’s not hard to see why once-legendary developers who’ve lost their way flock to Kickstarter. Second chances are rare, especially in an industry where a single dud can sink entire 100-person studios. Rebirths and reinventions, meanwhile, used to be damn near unheard of. But now it’s all possible, and wouldn’t you know it? Everyone you fondly remember from your childhood is coming out of the woodwork. A true Myst revival, however, has been conspicuously absent throughout NostalgiaFest 2013, but then, I suppose it’s only fitting that exploratory, methodical puzzling took its sweet time getting to the scene of its own potential resurgence. So then, what exactly is Obduction? Pretty much what you’d expect: a spiritual sequel to Myst and Riven, powered by shiny Unreal Engine 4 tech.

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A People’s History Of The FPS, Part 1: The WAD

By Robert Yang on September 19th, 2012.


“A People’s History” is a three part essay series by Robert Yang. He told us that he wanted to write an alternate view of the traditionally accepted history of the FPS genre as entirely dominated and driven by the mainstream, commercial industry, and to “argue for a long-standing but suppressed tradition of non-industry involvement in the first-person genre”. This is part one.

In 1994, the New York Times filed a review of a first-person game under its “Arts” section, proclaiming it to be “a game that weaves together image, sound and narrative into a new form of experience.” It sold millions of copies and inspired dozens of imitators. It seemed poised to define an era.

That game was Myst and it failed to define an era. Instead, a game called Doom came out three months after Myst — and then it shot Myst in the face.
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Fullbright On The Games Gone Home Is And Isn’t Like

By Alec Meer on July 9th, 2012.

Last week, I ran the first half of my recent chat with Steve Gaynor, formerly of Irrational and 2K Marin, and now of indie studio The Fullbright Company – who are working on mysterious, ambitious, suburban-set non-combat first-person game Gone Home. Being as I am an investigative journalist par excellence, I decided that it would be appropriate to spend the second half of the interview forgoing questioning entirely in favour of simply shouting the names of other games at him. Games like Myst, Amnesia, Jurassic Park: Trespasser, Journey and Dear Esther. Rather than hanging up in disgust, he offered fascinating, thoughtful replies on the limits of interactivity in games and the sort of scale Gone Home is intended to operate on.
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Eurogamer Retro: Myst

By John Walker on November 22nd, 2010.

I hate Myst.

A hundred years ago, when I first started out writing reviews for PC Gamer, I was sent the adventure games. This was partly because I knew a lot about adventure games, but mostly because they were far more likely to be awful. And everyone hates me. Which meant I suffered at the hands of Myst. Myst, a game more tedious than being shown someone’s photographs after they’ve been on holiday to Swindon, spawned so many copycat pre-rendered mechanical-puzzled miseryfests. And sure, while they paid my rent, my loathing grew and grew. You may have played Myst when it first game out, and in your youthful naivety mistook it for something not purest evil, but I’ll bet you didn’t play Dracula: Resurrection, Jerusalem: The 3 Roads To The Holy Land, or Arthur’s Knights 2. Or Schizm: The Mysterious Journey. Or The Secret of Nautilus. Or The New Adventures Of The Time Machine. Or The Watchmaker. Anyway, the point being, I’ve written a retro of the original Myst for Eurogamer. Choice quote below.

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Blink And You’ll Mys It: Myst Speed Run

By Quintin Smith on November 19th, 2010.

A computer game, yesterday.

This can take pride of place next to that 4 minute long Morrowind speed run. Somebody’s posted a video that travels all the way through Myst to the ending cutscene in a whopping 1 minute and 45 seconds. The footage is old as the hills, but the Hivemind policy on this is clear. If none of us have seen it, it’s statistically impossible for any of you to have seen it.
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Myst Offline II: The Offlinening

By Jim Rossignol on February 5th, 2008.

Gone. All gone.
There’s a document on my desktop that is entitled “Myst Online Adventures” and it contains a few lines about my first few steps in the famously underwhelming MMO. I was going to go back and do a bit of investigative playtesting for RPS japes, but sadly that document’s completion would be useless for anything other than historical record: Myst Online will close in 59 days time. Sniff.

This forum post has the details.

Many of you have made good friends while playing Myst Online, so here is the bittersweet part. Although Myst Online: Uru Live will be completely shut down in the near future, the game servers will remain live for the next 60 days. During that time, both newcomers and existing players can continue to experience the amazing world of Myst Online, explore the game’s many Ages, and interact with other players in the game and on the MystOnline.com website and forums. After 60 days, the title will be removed from the GameTap service, though MystOnline.com will remain live and active for fans to continue to share their passion for this important game franchise.

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