Posts Tagged ‘nitrome’

He Wears Rouge: Red Rogue Released

By Adam Smith on December 4th, 2012.

Hack, slash, splatter. Red Rogue first attracted my attention with its striking colour scheme, espied while playing a work-in-progress build entered into IGF 2012. Everything is teetering on the greyscale, except for blood and blood is as red as Rudolph’s nose. Bump into anything and the dungeon is spattered with that lovely redness, even if your victim is the tiniest of spiders, innocently dangling from the ceiling. Now complete and available for absolutely no money whatsoever, the game is a side-scrolling roguelike, packed with monsters and potentially lethal unidentified trinkets. There are two modes – a realtime ARPG type hack and slash, or a turn-based voyage downward for the those who like their roguelikes to be more like rogue. Jolly good.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

17 Comments »

Snot Bad At All: Swindler

By John Walker on February 22nd, 2012.

This is my life with my current cold.

I have come to the conclusion that indie developers will never run out of cool new ways to meddle with platforming standards. The latest I’ve encountered is Swindler, from the pixel masters at Nitrome (check out why we rate them). Here you appear to play a blob of snot, who is able to let loose from his own ectoplasmic entity a long, stretchy green string, tied to a post at the top of a level, and then extended or contracted. However, rather than moving him about the world, you move the world about him.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

14 Comments »

Go Bombing In Vain: Rainbogeddon

By Adam Smith on February 3rd, 2012.

I had brilliant words for the 'R' 'O' 'Y' part of the headline but not enough space to use them. Brilliant, they were.

The latest release from Nitrome is one of those games that I wish I’d discovered later in the day, because I’m going to spend the remaining hours until I’m released from the shackles that bind me to the keyboard wishing I was playing it. It’s called Rainbogeddon, which should really be enough to make you click here and play it. If you haven’t, know that it’s Pacman, Bomberman, Dig Dug and loads of other brilliant things all packed together into a browser window. Destructible mazes? Of course. Oodles and oodles of powerups? Definitely. A little too tiny for my dwindling eyesight to fully take in? Regrettably. Go and play it. Do it for me, because I can’t.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

14 Comments »

Not Ruble Trouble? Rubble Trouble Moscow

By John Walker on December 22nd, 2011.

This is how the Russians do it.

I do like destroying things. Buildings, hope, people’s lives. So I’m immediately drawn to Nitrome’s Rubble Trouble Moscow. You may remember the original Rubble Trouble in Feb last year, and apparently there was another one between then and now. This one is Russian themed, in so much as the characters are wearing hats, and the music is a bit Russian. The actual game is still blowing up buildings using a constantly changing arsenal of strange weapons. Now including tanks, dancing bears and gymnasts. And it’s still good fun, apart from a frustratingly drifty camera, and a game in a box which doesn’t capture your cursor. Which is annoying. But fortunately the rest of the game isn’t, and is infuriatingly morish. Even though I’m currently stuck on a level and getting increasingly frustrated.

, , , , .

7 Comments »

Crimson Blaggard: Red Rogue

By Adam Smith on October 28th, 2011.

bloody rogues

Wouldn’t it be great if someone took part roguelike and part platformer and stuck them in a programming pot, producing some tasty gaming gumbo? Yes, I know about Spelunky. I was spelunkying before all the hip kids jumped on board. I’m talking about something else here. Red Rogue is a work in progress, an entry into the IGF 2012, which isn’t really a roguelike platformer at all, it’s more like a sidescrolling roguelike. The graphics are minimalist and, to my eye, pleasingly effective, there’s already a great deal of variety in items and enemies, and if it wasn’t the beginning of a busy day, I’d probably end up playing this for hours. Current build here.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , .

24 Comments »

Hey! Let’s All Play Steamlands

By Jim Rossignol on April 21st, 2011.


As previously mentioned, Steamlands looks pretty perfect. So it’s excellent news that it is now available to play on Nitrome. The game puts you in charge of a giant steam-tank which must be customised to overcome the various enemies you face. In this way, your enemies are crushed. If only all things in life were so.

, .

28 Comments »

Alright, So Steamlands Looks Pretty Perfect

By Quintin Smith on April 14th, 2011.

Keep your eyes on the coal.

That impenetrable castle of good taste that is the Indiegames Blog has posted footage of a game called Steamlands, the current project of indie dev nitrome. Steamlands is a Captain Forever style action game wherein you’re expected to build your vehicle as you go, but with the tower defence twist that the turrets on it are semi-automated. RPS has never done stickers for games, like “MUST BUY” or “ONE TO WATCH”, but if we did then I would waste no time in slapping one on this game that read “FULL GORGEOUS”. Plenty of footage awaits after the jump.
Read the rest of this entry »

, , .

48 Comments »

DEATH WORM 2.0

By Alec Meer on July 28th, 2010.

We all loved DEATH WORM. DEATH WORM! It’s one of the first indie games we ever posted about on RPS, and mentioning its hallowed name remains the only known way to make Jim Rossignol use an exclamation mark.

Free browser game Worm Food is not DEATH WORM 2.0, nor is it officially related to DEATH WORM, but it is a lot like it. Probably too much like it, to be honest. Still: death worms.
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

52 Comments »

New Folder: Faultline

By Jim Rossignol on June 21st, 2010.


Because today is Monday, one of the most overused days of the week, I am forced to prescribe web-based distraction game, for your health. Today it’s Faultline, which is a cute little platformer in which you folder the level like the pages of a puzzlebook, and then unfold them again to continue your quest. Yes, it’s a one-trick pony, but it’s a pony that can fold itself in half, which is something you ought to see. (If you can make your way past the barrage of advertising, anyway.)

, , .

15 Comments »