Posts Tagged ‘Nostalgia’

Kicking It Old School: The Peril Of Kickstarter Nostalgia

By John Walker on October 4th, 2012.

In their crazy baggy jeans.

When interviewing Charles Cecil about his Kickstarter for Broken Sword 5, I interrupted him at one point to ask about a claim I’ve heard many making during this recent crowd-funding surge: that publishers prevent innovation. Perhaps they do, perhaps they don’t, but what exactly does that have to do with remaking games people liked in the 90s? I think perhaps this theme reaches its parodic zenith with the title of the proposed project from Brathwaite and Hall: Old School Role-Playing Game.

Kickstarter success stories have so far been firmly rooted in nostalgia, not innnovation. We’re seeing some of the biggest talent in the industry openly abandoning the ambition of innovation, and we’re paying them to do it.

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The State Of Computer Games… From 1984

By John Walker on July 26th, 2012.

Why couldn't they just broadcast TV in HD back then?

For no other reason than because I love you, below you can see an American programme – Computer Chronicles – looking at the current state of computer games, almost 30 years ago. Beyond knowingly laughing at how they just don’t know stuff from the future, and their jumpers, it’s a fascinating perspective. Not just to see how gaming was already considered both old by then, and just how much the presentation in the media hasn’t changed. They ask, “Are computer games here to stay?” You can see the half-hour PBS programme below.

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Jane’s Advanced Strike Fighters Given March 9 Lift-Off

By Craig Pearson on February 29th, 2012.

Why do jets look sad to me?
Precocious, pondering, prattish younger me used to stand in game shops holding Jane’s Combat Simulation games, marveling at the heft of the box, the grandeur of the screens, imagining Jane at her desk, making a game and being so proud she’d put her name to it. I was stupid. Now I know better: Jane is the second name of military enthusiast Fred T. Jane, and he died in 1916. He didn’t make those games, although given that they were basically manuals made into gaming form, with his love of detailing military hardware he’d probably have enjoyed their elegant air battles and cockpit rendering. As for the latest incarnation, Jane’s Advanced Strike Fighters, being released a full decade after the last one, I’m pondering how he’d react. The video below looks fun, sure, but I’m sensing developers Evolved GamesTrickstar have taken a bit of a diversion around realism.
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Thief Gold Sneaks Onto GOG.com

By Craig Pearson on January 31st, 2012.

Shhhhh.
I can’t believe that writing about a 14 year-old game is getting both me and Adam so excited (He: “This is the best thing ever!”), but Looking Glass’s genre-defining classic Thief is now available to download on Good Old Games. I’m downloading it right now, Taffer.
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Geek Lust: USB Atari Controller

By Alec Meer on October 17th, 2008.

Clearly horribly impractical for most fancy-doodle modern games, but god it’s lovely:

What would you play with this, lovely readers?

(Via Blues)

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Fury of the Furries & Me

By Alec Meer on November 22nd, 2007.

“Fury of the Furries.” Snort. D’y’know, that wasn’t funny back in 1993. Now, though, hoo-boy. Angry men defending their rights to dress up in teddy bear suits is a game that simply must come to pass. 1993’s Fury of the Furries, though, was a platform game about cute fluffy things with goo-goo voices fighting for their right to exist. Oh.

On with the story, anyway. A warning: this post is more nostalgia than restrospective, I’m afraid, but everyone has a unique gaming heritage, so maybe it’ll be at least a little interesting in that respect. Maybe. I suspect it stands a better chance of being the longest piece of writing about Fury of the Furries on the entire internet. Read the rest of this entry »

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