Posts Tagged ‘NVIDIA’

3D Card Update: AMD Fury, How Much Graphics Memory Is Enough, Nvidia’s New Budget Graphics

It’s time to catch up with the latest graphics kit and developments as fully unified shader architectures wait for no man. Nvidia has just released a new value-orientated 3D card in the GeForce GTX 950. We’re talking roughly £120 / $160 and so entry-level for serious gaming. But could you actually live with it?

Meanwhile, AMD’s flagship Radeon R9 Fury graphics has landed at Laird towers. Apart from being geek-out worthy simply as the latest and greatest from one of the two big noises in gaming graphics, the Fury’s weird, wonderful and maybe just a little wonky 4GB ‘HBM’ memory subsystem begs a potentially critical conundrum. Just how much memory do you actually need for gaming graphics?
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , .

68 Comments »

NVIDIA Cards To Get PS4-Style Remote Game-Sharing

it’s 2015: if you’re not streaming your game while you play it, you will be summarily asked to leave society. Don’t you dare try to play a game by yourself any more. Privacy is dead: everyone wants an audience, always and forever. Do you want to watch me shower? No? Well, how about watch me ineffectually flail at a pack of Nekkers in The Witcher 3? No? Well, how about you take remotely control and fight those Nekkers for me, to put everyone involved out of their misery. NVIDIA have, in theory, a way to make that happen.
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

28 Comments »

To 4K Or Not 4K? The Pros & Cons Of Ultra-HD Gaming

With Laird Towers currently undergoing major renovations, RPS’s hardware coverage has been forced to retreat to the vaults. But that hasn’t stopped me. No, I’ve battled through the dust, the rubble, the builders lumbering about the place at ungodly hours of the morning (I regard consciousness before 9:30am as rather uncivilised) and the relentless tea-making to bring you some reflections on 4K gaming. We’ve covered several interesting alternatives to 4K of late including curved super-wide monitors, high refresh rates, IPS panels and frame synced screens. So does that experience put a new spin on plain old 4K, aka gaming at a resolution of 3,840×2160? Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , .

85 Comments »

Asus MG279Q: The Messiah Of Monitors?

27-inch IPS LCD panel? Check. 144Hz refresh rate? Yep. Some kind of frame-smoothing adaptive sync technology? Present and accounted for. 2,560 by 1,440 pixels? Count ‘em. A price you can afford? Bit borderline, but that was inevitable. Is Asus’s new MG279Q therefore the perfect LCD panel, the one we’ve all been waiting for, the veritable messiah of PC monitors? I’ve been eyeballs-on. All will now be revealed…
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , .

92 Comments »

Killing Floor 2 Demonstrates PhysX Flex Tech Using Guts

PHYSICS!

Demos for new physics technologies usually look like Bodyform commercials, with gentle blue water sloshing around and lots of smooth rippling fabric. That’s how Nvidia have shown their new unified particle-based physics tech PhysX Flex so far – lots of rubbery water balloons flopping about and leaking blue wet. Pssh, it won’t look like that in the games we actually play.

Killing Floor 2 [official site] will be the first Flex-using game to ship, and a new look at how it uses the tech is more how Bodyform ads should be: scattering gutfuls of fluids, globs, and guts.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , .

26 Comments »

The Witcher 3 Has Better Hair Than You

The Witcher 3 promises to be 'shaggy' in more ways than one.

This is why you don’t schedule meetings for 5pm on a Friday. I can just picture the team at Nvidia sitting there, itching to get home. “Last item on the agenda. What can we name the new GameWorks hair effects?” A pregnant pause and some furtive looks towards the door. Someone at the back eventually pipes up. “…HairWorks?” A growing murmur of approval and some scooting of chairs later, here we are: with a trailer showing off a bunch of cool physics effects in The Witcher 3 [official site] (including, yep, HairWorks) exclusive to those of you with Nvidia cards. Looks like AMD fans are stuck with less luscious locks than their Geforce friends.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

67 Comments »

Can Tech Demos Cry? Square Enix’s DX12 Witch Chapter 0

Being a cold and distant sort, I don’t know what to make of crying. It’s the thing where your face gets wet without swimming, yeah? I’ll trust Square Enix when they say “the human emotion of crying” is “one of the most difficult representations for existing real-time CG technology” but not know what to make of their fancy new tech demo with high-def crying.

Squeenix last week showed off a new DirectX 12 tech demo with a crying lady running on a chunky PC packing four Nvidia GeForce Titan X GPUs. the demo named so-very-Squeenixly ‘WITCH CHAPTER 0 [cry]’ is some pretty fancy pixel-pushing, but even to my reptilian eyes I don’t think we’re out the weird creepy puppet people phase yet.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

33 Comments »

Why £200 / $250 Is The 1080p Graphics Card Sweet Spot

Is this the best sub-£200 board you can buy?

What’s the best graphics card mere mortals can buy for around £200 / $250? This is a question for the ages. Or at least for a slow Thursday evening. In all seriousness, the £200 / $250 price point ticks a lot of important boxes. It’s been in and around the sweet spot for balancing price and performance for properly gameable graphics for a while. I reckon it’s also pretty near critical mass in terms of how much you lot are willing to spend on a video board. At a push, most of us can stretch to £200 / $250 if the payoff is great gaming. Luckily, it is.
Read the rest of this entry »

, , .

148 Comments »

Wot Does Wot: Grand Theft Auto V Graphics Settings Guide

Extended Distance Scaling, Particles Quality, Tessellation, Grass Quality… if you’re trying to squeeze a few extra frames per second out of Grand Theft Auto V [official site], you might be a mite confused by some of the settings in its options. How much of a visual change do they make, how much do they affect performance, and what do some even mean?

Handily, Nvidia have put together a fancy guide explaining what they all do, showing off the visual difference they make through comparison screenshots, and investigating the performance costs.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , .

41 Comments »

G-Sync vs. Freesync: Which Dynamic Refresh Is Best?

The best things in life aren't free

It feels like whole months since there was a good old fashioned fisticuffs between AMD and Nvidia. They do so love a PR punch up. But this one’s a bit different. Nvidia’s G-Sync technology versus AMD’s FreeSync isn’t the usual trench warfare over fractions of a frame per second. It’s much more interesting than that. It’s all about something called dynamic or adaptive refresh and how that can make games run much more smoothly without necessarily upgrading your video card and even at modest frame rates. G-Sync has been available for a while. But now the first FreeSync panels are out battle can commence…

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , .

54 Comments »

Is Nvidia’s New Titan X Uber-GPU Good Enough?

All in black: Nvidia's big new beastie

The same. But different. In a good way. That’s the take-home from the launch of Nvidia’s new Titan X graphics. Yes, it’s another $1,000 graphics card and thus priced well beyond relevance for most of us. And yet it’s different enough, philosophically, from Nvidia’s previous big-dollar Titans to signal something that does matter to all of us. The focus with Titan X has moved back to pure gaming and away from doing other variously worthy and unworthy stuff on GPUs, like folding proteins or, I dunno, surveying for oil.
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , .

27 Comments »

Why You Don’t Need Multiple Graphics Cards

Stop that. It's silly

Apparently contrary forces, but suddenly complimentary. Are AMD and Nvidia about to become the yin and yang of the PC gaming world? Possibly. Rumour has it graphicsy bits of that DirectX 12 thing that arrives with Windows 10 will allow for asynchronous multi-GPU (graphics processing unit). In other words, you’ll be able to use AMD and Nvidia cards in the same rig at the same time to make games run faster. As rumours go, this is pretty spectacular. But it does rather remind me. Multi-GPU is basically a bad idea. Here’s why.
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , .

125 Comments »

Week in Tech: Is Nvidia’s New £150/$200 Graphics Good?

Almost definitely not what a retail 960 will look like...

Ah, the glories of high-end graphics chips. The billions of teensy little transistors. The preposterous pixel pumping power. All terribly impressive. But not hugely helpful if you simply want half-decent frame rates on a plain old 1080p monitor without re-mortgaging everything short of the shirt on your back. In an ideal world, what most of us really need is an affordable £150/$200 graphics card that’ll hook up to that 1080p monitor and run almost anything you chuck at it without worrying about optimising the settings. Well, it just so happens Nvidia has a new GPU that fits the bill, on paper at least. It’s the Geforce GTX 960. Is this the mainstream marvel we’ve all been waiting for?
Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , .

73 Comments »