Posts Tagged ‘paradox development studio’

Colonial, Colloquial: EU IV Conquest Of Paradise Interview

By Adam Smith on January 10th, 2014.

Ahead of the release of Conquest of Paradise on January 14th, I spoke to Paradox Development Studio Lead Johann Andersson about the changes that the America-centric expansion will bring to Europa Universalis IV. As well as discussing the randomisation of the Americas, a first for the series, we talked about changes to the mechanics that govern Native American and colonial nations. Beyond the meaty mechanical conversation there are some thoughts on cultural representation in historical strategy. Perfect Friday evening reading, I say.

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2013’s Grandest Strategy Game: Crusader Kings 2

By Adam Smith on January 6th, 2014.

Crusader Kings 2 is one of my personal favourites of 2013, as it was in 2012, but it didn’t have a place in our calendar. It could been included using the Trojan Horse of DLC, as XCOM did thanks to Enemy Within, but it’s hard to pick out the stand-out expansion for CK II. Even The Old Gods, which expanded the timeframe, felt like part of the whole rather than a distinct item. That is part of the brilliance of the design, but it also makes it much harder to say ‘Crusader Kings II: Old Gods’ is one of the games of 2013 rather than simply saying, ‘Crusader Kings II is one of the games of the year. Again.” Here’s why I think that argument is valid.

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Go Native: Europa Universalis IV Introduces New World

By Graham Smith on December 14th, 2013.

This is a weirdly terrible drawing.

I haven’t returned to the fields of European conquest since the weeks immediately after Europa Universalis IV‘s release, because my Austrian struggles seemed like a personal canonical history I couldn’t repeat or replace. The Conquest of Paradise expansion might lure me back with a new world of promise, however. It’s due for release on January 14th, and a new developer diary video below explains the mechanics you’ll play with if you want to take control of the Native American tribes.
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Fun And Prophet: Crusader Kings 2 Expansion Out Now

By Graham Smith on November 18th, 2013.

If you enter in to Crusader Kings 2 with a plan to win, you’re going to be frustrated. It’s a complex turn-based strategy game set during the Middle Ages in Europe, with an overwhelming array of options available whether you start as a mighty King or a lowly Count. If you approach it as a role-playing game though, with an interest only in being interesting, then it’s an accessible, surprising delight to muddle your way through and craft your own stories.

That’s why any new expansion to the game is so exciting; every added layer of detail gives you a new role to perform. Sons of Abraham focuses on expanding the Jewish and Muslim faiths. It’s out now and there’s a new developer diary below.
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The New Worlds: EU IV – Conquest of Paradise

By Adam Smith on November 4th, 2013.

Sunset Invasion is the only expansion I don’t use in my regular Crusader Kings II campaigns. It’s not that I object to a spot of alternate history – that’s what the game generates – but the Aztec assault never felt comfortable, partly because it’s a triggered event rather than emergent possibility. It was with a degree of trepidation that I read the press release about Europa Universalis IV’s first expansion, with its suggestive title, Conquest of Paradise. I needn’t have worried – this is a form of alternate history but it sounds fantastic. In short, to make exploration more unpredictable and exciting, EU IV will gain the ability to randomly generate a New World rather than having players discover the same old Americas time and time again.

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Isaac Unbound: CK II – Sons Of Abraham

By Adam Smith on October 22nd, 2013.

Apparently, Crusader Kings II is still missing something, which seems unlikely considering the amount of content that each major expansion has added. The Old Gods took the cake* – Forseti loves a slice of Battenberg – adding a couple of centuries to play with, a host of religions and new raiding mechanics mechanics. That’s not the end of the road though. It seems the one God and the diverse groups that claim to know Him best is a little jealous of the Old Gods and the Sons of Abraham expansion is hoping to make Him feel better by honouring “the big three in Medieval Europe: Christianity, Judaism and Islam”. More details below.

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Wot I Think: Europa Universalis IV

By Adam Smith on August 13th, 2013.

Although it’s the fourth game in a well-respected series, Europa Universalis IV has been created in the shadow of Crusader Kings II, which unexpectedly but deservedly discovered a wider audience than its predecessors. As the next game from the internal Paradox Development Studio and a chronological sequel to CK II, EU IV has a weight of expectation upon it. The two games can even connect, covering almost a thousand years of history. Daunting, broad and deep, EU IV is more than equal to its burden. Here’s wot I think.

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Conversion Conversation: Europa Universalis IV

By Adam Smith on August 6th, 2013.

Paradox have uploaded a brief highlight reel from their recent broadcast, in which the save game converter for Europa Universalis IV and Crusader Kings II was discussed. The hosts are Paradox Development Studio manager Johan Andersson and Crusader Kings II lead Henrik Fahraeus, and at one point they fight, Henrik wielding a sword and Johan a lightsaber. These are serious men discussing serious business. The most important piece of information, which I’d missed when reading comments about the feed, is that CK II games can be imported, updating to the correct period, no matter what position they are saved at. For example, save in 1100 and EU IV will automatically advance that game to the fifteenth century and begin. Lots more and a full breakdown of post-release prices for preorder bonuses below.

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For The Glory: EU IV Contains CK II Save Game Converter

By Adam Smith on July 30th, 2013.

Paradox have sounded the news bugle to announce that Crusader Kings II, the game that has continued to expand and consume my days throughout 2013, is refusing to abdicate its crown. A polite ruler would step aside to make room for the next in line to the throne, but CK II has never been polite. It’s a devious, murderous omnicidal lord and it will never die. Today’s grand strategy news is this – Europa Universalis IV will couple with Crusader Kings II via a save-game converter.

Fans of Crusader Kings II will be able to maintain the empires they have established and guide them through the age of exploration in an all-new strategic experience, continuing their personal stories of expansion and conquest.

There’s a very good chance I won’t be playing anything else ever.

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Music And Maps: Europa Universal IV

By Adam Smith on July 15th, 2013.

We are approaching the historical strategy event horizon. I’ve been playing Civ V all weekend, exploring the Brave New World expansion, which has sucked me back with all the effectiveness of a vacuum cleaner in a black hole, triggering a late night Michael Corleone impression that left my flatmate concerned for my wellbeing. Then there’s Rome War: Total: The Second, which threatens to march into my life on September 3rd and conquer all of the free time that remains. There won’t be a great deal of free time because on August 13th, Europa Universalis IV arrives. I might as well say goodbye to the world for the rest of the year. Several developer diaries and songs below. Paradox really do like their songs.

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Selling Europe By The Pound: EU IV

By Adam Smith on June 13th, 2013.

Preordering anything in a digital format seems like an odd thing to do, unless you’re absolutely confident of the product’s quality and are getting some form of discount. Otherwise, why not wait, look for the best deal on release day and purchase then? All of that said, Europa Universalis IV is now available for preorder and, having spent almost a hundred hours with the pre-release version, I’m not afraid to say that it’s very good indeed. I’m sure you’ll be sad to hear that my preview copy has now vanished so I’ll have to wait until August 13th to play, like everybody else. The video below is less than a minute long so you’d have to watch it around 90,000 times to pass the time until release.

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The End Of Days: Europa Universalis IV Diary Part Two

By Adam Smith on June 6th, 2013.

The story so far. Twenty people gathered in Stockholm to engage in a multiplayer Europa Universalis IV session. On the first day, I made France powerful and formed an unnatural alliance with the English. And then I blew it all by misinterpreting an aspect of the game and splintering my own country. No matter. Mistakes are learning experiences and, with that in mind, I was about to make the biggest mistake of my life. By the end of the day, I had renamed Île-de-France. It was now a stain on the map by the name of ‘Mostly Corpses’.

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The End Of Days: Europa Universalis IV Diary Part One

By Adam Smith on May 31st, 2013.

A few weeks ago, Paradox invited a group of journalists to Stockholm in order to see how much violence we could do to one another in a massive two-day multiplayer session of Europa Universalis IV. I packed my bags, steeled my nerves and prepared to present Rock, Paper, Shotgun the only way I know how – with fruitless acts of violence and a burning desire to reduce France to ashes. Inevitably, it transpired that I would be playing as France but I wasn’t going to let that petty detail shake my resolve. Europe was about to meet its maker.

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