Posts Tagged ‘PCGA’

2009 PC Gaming Software Sales Up 3%

By Jim Rossignol on March 10th, 2010.


The PCGA (remember them?) have released a report to their members claiming that PC gaming software sales went up in 2009. The report apparently collated data on PC games software sales from all part of the world, in both retail and digital sales markets. “PC gaming software revenue was a $13.1 billion industry in 2009,” says the PCGA’s release, “up 3% from 2008.” While traditional mainstream PC games sales are still in decline, it seems that revenues across the globe have been boosted by online distribution. “In our surveys of PC gamers in North America and Europe we found that over 70% indicate they have bought a full game online. Furthermore, over 50% indicate that they have bought a virtual item,” said DFC Analyst David Cole. “This is very positive because, when done successfully, companies in Asia have found the digital distribution model to be significantly more profitable than the traditional retail boxed goods business.”

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PCGA President Randy Stude Talks Methodology

By Jim Rossignol on November 23rd, 2008.


Last week I spoke to Randy Stude, director of Intel’s gaming program and the president of the PC Gaming Alliance (PCGA). The PCGA is an industry consortium made up of hardware manufacturers and PC games publishers, each with a significant commercial interest in the platform. The PCGA has so far released a couple of studies (pdf link) to its members, each looking at the numbers of PC gaming, for both hardware and software sales. They regard these as the most comprehensive studies so far, and Stude was keen to point out they didn’t support the figures we mentioned previously from Jon Peddie Research. If anything, the PCGA suggest, PC gaming hardware sales are even bigger than that. And they should know: the PCGA members make all the components.

I was keen to learn a little more about what Stude’s intentions were, and what the PCGA really intended to do for our chosen platform. The answers were encouraging, and Stude seemed straightforward about the intentions of this, an industry business consortium, as well as the methodology that such a group should expect to employ.
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PCGA on “The Piracy Challenge”

By Jim Rossignol on November 11th, 2008.


Ars Technica recently took some time to talk to the PC Gaming Alliance‘s bossman, Randy Stude. Stude, who hails from Intel, was the man who stood up and announced the initiative by Intel, AMD, Nvidia, Dell, Gateway and others at GDC in February.

As well as proclaim his fellow PCGA members “the guardians of pc gaming”, Stude had this to say: “The PCGA will take up the challenge of piracy, not to assume the responsibility that the ESA has taken on… rather the PCGA would like to address the methodology that publishers might be able to take to solve, or to do a better job trying to solve, the piracy challenge for their substantial investments in content.”

Which is perhaps the one way that this initiative can really help: by at least trying to come up with a better solution that the currently meaningless anti-piracy solutions that we complain so bitterly about. As we discussed at the Thinkosium, general standards for PC gaming probably aren’t on the cards, but creative solutions to the big problems should be. There’s plenty more from Stude, so go read. Stude previously discussed these topics over on Gamasutra.

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Status Update: Jim at GDC

By Jim Rossignol on February 20th, 2008.

So yeah I’m at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco and hanging about talking to game people in overcrowded bars. It’s a fun time, with a few moments of genuine delight at the bright shiny world of gaming that lies ahead of us, and a few moments of numbing jetlag or vertiginous horror at our absurdly debauched modernity.

The really astounding thing about this event is that it makes it quite clear just how many really bright people there are who basically just want to enjoy their lives by spending them making games. Bright people should really be using their giant brains to fix the sky or create cures for hiccups, but I’m nevertheless chuffed that some of them are putting their energies directly into the thing that I care most about: defeating boredom (or Ennui Lite, as I’m rebranding it for 2008). I’ll blog about one of these people a bit later. He’s someone you’ve never heard of, and who blew my mind with a laptop and a half hour conversation.


The Intel guy said logos are expensive, but we prove otherwise

But anyway, let’s talk about The Personal Computer Gaming Alliance. Or how Intel and their gigantic computer chums want to save our platform.
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