Posts Tagged ‘platformer’

And Now You Can Buy Pid

By John Walker on November 1st, 2012.

I completely forgot about Might And Delight’s Pid. Last December I saw the first trailer, and my thoughts turned to goshes. Time then went past at a quite inconsiderate rate, and it’s out today. Crikey. And oddly enough, it’s still looking incredibly lovely. I’m going to get my hands on it straight away.

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Hands On: Platformines

By John Walker on October 17th, 2012.

Last night I tipped back my head and cried to the world, “I want a Metroid-style game to play!” “Play the Platformines beta, then dummy,” came the reply. So I did. And still am. And it’s huge. Falling somewhere between Terraria and an Amiga combat-based platformer, Magiko Gaming‘s enormous open world of 2D jumping and shooting is already looking pretty damned fine. And you know what’s better than a double-jump?

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Pane In The Glass: Stained Demo

By Adam Smith on October 1st, 2012.

Now available, Stained is an indie platformer, with enough spells, physics problems and colours that a comparison to Trine seems justified. Many of the colours are more than decorative though, residing in enchanted stained glass windows, which form into enemies or platforms when shattered. The lacerating foes are generated from the specific shards of glass scattered about a room, so attempting to break windows in a specific sequence could theoretically lead to an easier fight, but even when they’ve been smashed to bits, enemies can recombine and become new shapes if their parts mingle together. Movement looks awkwardly slow and the trailer isn’t hugely convincing, but there’s a demo to try as well.

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Moody: Giana Sisters – Twisted Dreams Out October

By Adam Smith on September 28th, 2012.

Project Giana, the 25th anniversary homage to/evolution of The Great Giana Sisters, has a proper, actual name now. If I have a child, I’ll insist that the wailing bundle be referred to as Project Baby for the first six months of its life, and only then will I name it after a popular chart musician of the times. Project Giana has become Giana Sisters: Twisted Dreams, the post-colon words referring to the platformer’s dual realities, which can be flipped at any time. From fluff and nonsense to tentacles and spikes. The video below shows it all in action and the game is actually out on October 23rd.

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World Changing: Project Giana Demo

By John Walker on August 28th, 2012.

Everyone has gaps in their gaming knowledge. Like, for instance, you’ve never heard of Lungo – the seminal C64 platformer that defined how double jumping would work forever. Me, I’d not heard of The Great Giana Sisters. Contain your horror. In case you’re in the same camp as me (woo, camp buddies!) this was a quite astonishingly blatant rip-off of Super Mario Bros released in 1987. Nintendo, who as ever stubbornly refused to release their games on anything but their own console, were jolly cross about this, and had it pulped. And thus it entered legend. Except, apparently not any legends ever shared with me.

The point being, they behind this are returning with a new Kickstarted version, Project Giana, and it bears almost nothing in common with the game it previously so liberally stole from. Which is a bit confusing. Fortunately, there’s now a demo.

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He’s Not A Drop To Drink: Walter

By Adam Smith on June 15th, 2012.

The sign is telling you to drink his innards with a straw, trust me.

Walter is not a stop motion point and click game about a bag of water exploring the world. The trailer suggests that’s what it’s going to be before actually demonstrating that it’s a gorgeous platformer with fluid physics, state changes and a delightful sense of wonder. Fair enough then, although I’d probably play the stop motion version as well. Unfortunately, I’ll have to wait until the terrifying future time that is 2013, at which point all of Earth’s water will have been turned into brown fizzjuice by Coca Cola, which will then sell it to the highest bidder at horrific blood-auctions. Poor Walter’s going to look like a terribly inappropriate work of mockery. See for yourself below.

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Wot I Think: Adventures Of Shuggy

By John Walker on June 13th, 2012.

Shuggy, meet Shuggy.

David Johnston, the man behind Smudged Cat Games, caught our attention with the absolutely fantastic forthcoming Gateways. However, his previous game, Adventures Of Shuggy, is reaching the PC today via Steam. More mind-bending 2D puzzling, but this time without a magic gun. I took a look to find out Wot I Think.

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Carrot In Hell: Wrath Of The Dead Rabbit

By Adam Smith on May 8th, 2012.

What’s the best game with an exclamation mark in its title? Hell Yeah! Wrath of the Dead Rabbit has one but I’m going to stop using it now because it’s awkward and silly, which could well be an accurate description of the game itself. Published by Sega and developed by Arkedo, who made three minimalist but stylish games for XBLIG and PSN, Hell Yeah is a loud tale of revenge, rubber duck shame tapes and the rabbity prince of Hell. The trailer below is so much in your face that you might end up mistaking it for your cheekbone and I’m not entirely sure that it’s my particular brand of madcap tea, but others may be more impressed by its cartoon violence.

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Reverse Child Catcher: Offspring Fling

By Adam Smith on April 3rd, 2012.

If Edmund McMillen had made this game, the offspring would burst much more frequently

Kyle Pulver, superior veteran of a thousand gamejams, has expanded a riff on the theme of motherhood that emerged from his brain last year, making it into a full release for PC and Mac. It’s a platform game, with puzzles made up of switches, blocks and infant forest animals deflecting around the levels. The clue as to your maternal ability is in the title: Offspring Fling. As the mother of a sizable brood of cuddly critters, your method of transporting them to safety is to balance them on your head and then lob them out of harm’s way. Of course, as you progress through the 100+ levels throwing your kids around the place becomes increasingly hazardous, as they begin to act more like soft, organ-filled pinballs than living, dying creatures. Watch.

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Falling From The Top Of The World: TowerClimb

By Adam Smith on March 27th, 2012.

Spikes...why'd it have to be spikes?

Cheerfully described as a “roguelike platformer”, TowerClimb is like Spelunky in reverse, although that’s not to imply it’s a copycat. It’s a compliment, and also the quickest way I can think of to describe TowerClimb’s abundance of style and the smartness of its execution. Currently in beta, the game throws the amusingly named stalwarts (Walter is my greatest climber) at the bottom of a randomly generated tower, filled with dangers ranging from the disjointed architecture itself to giant rats and bats. Jumping, climbing, hanging, fleeing – all are integral but the main thing to be done is to die. Paying $5 now provides immediate beta access and a copy of the game once it’s deemed ready for a full release. A trailer and more thoughts lie broken on the cold, hard floor below.

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Monochromomentum: Here Comes Launchman Demo

By Adam Smith on February 13th, 2012.

A lesser man would have instructed you to 'jump into the Launchman demo', the idiot

Chromophobic and filled with spikes, Here Comes Launchman looks like a cousin of VVVVVV, but now that developers The Layabouts have made an alpha demo available, it’s possible to defy that comparison by actually playing the game. It’s true that in the afternoon I’ve spent with it, more time than I care to remember has involved evaporating upon contact with tapering points of instant murder and I have at times been taken aback by a sudden shift of the entire colour palette, but where VVVVVV demanded precision and had controls tuned for such, Launchman has a more bouncy and loose approach to life (and death). See for yourself with the demo, or follow me to more words across the inconveniently placed gap below.

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