Posts Tagged ‘Preloaded’

Neurotic Neurons: Axon

By Adam Smith on March 20th, 2012.

The red tendrils represent Cthulhu's dreams

Commissioned to accompany the Brains: The Mind as Matter exhibition at the Wellcome Collection, Axon looks a little like flOw, except it’s much more hectic, with short games and high scores.

The game challenges players to grow their neuron as long as possible; climbing through brain tissue, out-competing rival neurons and creating as many connections to distant regions of the brain as they can.

This involves clicking on nodes in an effort to climb higher and higher. A speedy mouse finger is essential as a rapidly shrinking sphere marks the areas that are accessible and once no unclaimed nodes are within it, it’s gameover. Brain freeze. Play it here and read more (silly) below and (clever) here.

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Science Museum Gets Gaming: Futurecade

By John Walker on February 2nd, 2012.

Arcade games don't tend to stay still very well.

Preloaded, the indie team behind The End and zOMT have teamed up with the Science Museum to create a series of games aimed at school-goers, to ask questions about the role of science in our future. Called Futurecade, it’s a collection of four arcade games, each loosely themed to a direction in which technology is taking us. And one of them is properly great. Think about that a moment – an educational game aimed at teenagers that’s good.

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The End Has Begun: Impressions

By John Walker on August 9th, 2011.

This is what happens after you die: a videogame.

Preloaded’s latest game for Channel 4, The End, is out today. It’s a game about death, big questions, and in turn, life. It’s also a platform game. And a board game. That’s a strange combination. Does it work? Well, I’ve been having a play.

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The Beginning Of: The End

By John Walker on July 5th, 2011.

I always knew shadows had more purpose than just shade.

Preloaded‘s next game for Channel 4, The End, has a trailer out and about. For how long? No one knows. But have we posted it yet? No we haven’t. And we’re sure gonna, because it’s utterly mystifying. Much like its subject: death.

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Populesque: zOMT

By Alec Meer on June 1st, 2011.

a green, unpleasant land

Adult Swim: home of naughty cartoons and a surprising number of clever, free indie games. UK ministudio Preloaded are the latest to join those ranks, with side-scrolling, high-casualty strategy game zOMT.

Auto-marching strategy games, wherein your lads do most of the violent legwork for you once you’ve built them, are increasingly pervasive – the nominal successor to tower defence, and based on similar values. zOMT differs somewhat in that it’s primarily a defensive game, with you spending generated mana on constructing soldiers, exploding madmen, elemental spells, bomb-bouncing clouds and sturdy trees to keep an implacable enemy from nobbling your base.
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Love Is The Greatest Thing: Thingdom

By Kieron Gillen on July 1st, 2010.

This really is quite the screenshot.

It’s the new game from Preloaded - who you may remember from 1066 and Trafalgar. It’s basically their game for the Science Museum in London for their current Who Am I genetics-related gallery. As such, Thingdom is a virtual-pet game about breeding fluffy things – basically Spore for kids (So, just Spore then – Cynical Ed). Plus! explicit genetic recombination of attributes! To be honest, the second I got the above screenshot guaranteed that I was going to have to post about it, but that you can freeze your genetically inferior thingies by removing their hat on the ice levels also gains kudos. Play here, if you feel like breeding too.

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I Like Big Boats: Trafalgar Origins

By Kieron Gillen on May 5th, 2010.

Feel lucky I didn't make a Breeders gag.

News reaches us that Preloaded have done another of their education games. You’ll remember the Tim-Stone favoured 1066? Of course you do. And if you don’t, you’ll have clicked on that link. This time it’s Trafalgar Origins, an arcade game based around tall-ships and Nelson generally kicking ship-ass. Or Stern, as I believe it’s known. My quick play reveals a game which simplifies a little (you fire a broadside and your whole ship counts as if it’s reloading), but includes a lot of fine details (multiple shot types plus floating powder-keg mines, wind direction, etc) to complicate it just so. And RPG elements with buying crew, facebook integration and multiplayer. Also just enough edutainment to justify its remit as part of Channel 4’s remit. Trailer follows…
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Cash Channel: Channel 4 Commisions Brit-Indies

By Kieron Gillen on September 7th, 2009.

Sometimes, the future creeps up when we’re not looking. Part of me wonders whether this will be part of it. Channel 4, after some impressive successes with webgames like the Bafta Award Winning Bow Street Runner and the Tim Stone admiration winning 1066 have decided to spend a load more on making games, reports Develop. Key quote…

The move is part of a £4.5m fund – half of which is finding its way to UK independent companies such as Tuna Technologies, Beatnik Games, Zombie Cow Studios, Six to Start, Preloaded and Littleloud to fund projects up to £800,000 in size.

Go read the rest of the interview with Alice Taylor to see the full story. Some thoughts and noting of conflict of interest follow…
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1066: Shield Walls And Stench Weasels

By Tim Stone on June 7th, 2009.

The bloke that cut-me-up on the A303 yesterday is a STENCH WEASEL, the librarian that never returns my smile is a RAVEN STARVER, and the person that regularly fly-tips at the end of my road is a STINKING TURD. Thank you midden-mouthed web wargame 1066, a week in your company has enriched my abuse lexicon no end.

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