Posts Tagged ‘puzzle’

Freeware Garden: Over My Dead Body

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on November 13th, 2014.

The ghosts, the gunmen and the zombies.

Noel Brody worked for the evil Mortiga Consolidated, but never suspected that protesting the weaponization of her research would lead to her being murdered. What she further failed to imagine was that her death would also transform her into both a zombie and a ghost and get her to star in her very own game: Over My Dead Body.

Noel must now fight her way through Mortiga’s lovely-yet-deadly isometric corporate headquarters and exact horrible, bloody revenge on all the immoral bastards who killed her and are apparently about to kill more people for money. Finding a cure for her doubly-undead affliction, or possibly reclaiming her work for the good of humanity, should be considered an added bonus.

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Eigengrau Menagerie: Not A Collection of Sneezing Sounds

By Cassandra Khaw on November 9th, 2014.

I swear I wasn't trying to sneak a peek of you in the bathroom, lady. Seriously. You're not even my type. I mean, you're pretty. But, I like them with skin and not - god, I'm in trouble, aren't I? Please don't -

Lifeforms? Lifeforms? The Eigengrau Menagerie is a classy place for deep cogitations and Thoughtforms, sir. Currently embroiled in the popularity contest that is Steam Greenlight, The Eigengrau Menagerie is a sumptuous little puzzle-adventure game, filled with phantasmagorical art and a literary soul.

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The Talos Principle’s Demo Will Test Your Humanity

By Cassandra Khaw on November 8th, 2014.

You can now play a slice from The Talos Principle for free, if you like. Which I think you should, because a philosophical first-person puzzler from the makers of Serious Sam that seems genuinely awesome is as rare as a kirin in France. Editorial overlord John Walker says that The Talos Principle is a “surprising new direction” for Croteam. Gone are the guns, the manic humor. In their stead stands writing from Jonas Kyratzes and FTL’s Tom Jubert, neither of whom seem to be very frantic nor very frivolous. The “public test” will let you explore “four increasingly difficult complete puzzle levels.” Why? Because the developers want to use you and thousands like you for their additional stress and compatibility testing.

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Freeware Garden: Masami – Sushi Ace

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on October 27th, 2014.

One for relatively healthy food too.

It may have been a crucial part of Sega’s marketing strategy 20 years ago, but, inspired as it may have been, Columns never really came close to replicating the ridiculous success of Tetris. Chances are Masami – Sushi Ace won’t do much better either, despite it being a lovely take on the classic formula of the falling blocks arcade puzzler.

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Hexcells Infinite Is Out Monday, All Other Gaming To Cease

By John Walker on August 28th, 2014.

Alice woz ere.

Oh Hexcells. How I love thee. As a man obsessed with puzzle games, it is with no small amount of consideration that I say Hexcells is the best new puzzle in the last few years. I’ve jabbered my delight over both Hexcells and sequel Hexcells Plus previously, and I’m giddy-thrilled to see that there’s to be a third and final game in the series, out next month, called Hexcells Infinite. And it’s out on Monday.

…final?!

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Wot I Think: Mind – Path To Thalamus

By John Walker on August 11th, 2014.

Spanish-born Mind: Path To Thalamus is a first-person puzzler with some really astonishingly pretty levels. Is it a cerebral experience, a sensory delight? (Jokes for neurologists, there!) Here’s wot I think:

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Wot I Think: Dynetzzle Extended

By John Walker on July 22nd, 2014.

Dynetzzle Extended may be the worst name of a game I’ve ever seen, but the puzzle is interesting. I took a look at the free 10 level version back in March, and now the full 25 level version is released, for a mere single dollar. Does it expand nicely into a larger puzzle game? Here’s wot I think:

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Rubik’s Surface: Flip

By Adam Smith on May 12th, 2014.

Take me out for a romantic meal and you’ll have to order that fourth bottle of wine before I reveal an emotion and even then it’s likely to warp into a desire to find a dark underground club that plays music sucked from the scabby centre of the nineties. A bellyfull of Pinot Noir and a blast of Longpigs, and I’m done – vanishing into the forest of bodies on the dancefloor. Not a cheap date, or a particularly satisfying one.

When it comes to puzzle games, I’m the cheapest of cheap dates though, as Flip proved to me a few moments ago. The free version of this attractive and perplexing perception-troubler contains ‘more than 20 puzzles’ but I recognised the potential limits of my patience after around fifteen. It’s clever stuff though and the full version, which is $2.49 (50% discounted) at present, offers more than a thousand conundrums.

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Impressions: Ether One

By John Walker on April 3rd, 2014.

First-person adventure Ether One aims to explore a difficult subject – dementia – through storytelling and puzzles. The debut game from indie team White Paper Games is out now, and I’ve had a play. And a struggle. You can read my thoughts below.

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Dynetzzle: Terrible Name, Interesting Game

By John Walker on March 13th, 2014.

Here’s a novel puzzle game, with a deeply peculiar name. Dynetzzle – seemingly crafted in a special laboratory to be the most forgettable, irrelevant, and impossible to remember how to spell game name of all time – is based around unfolded dice. Nets of cubes, combined with the magical fact that all opposite sides of a dice add up to 7. Combine those two elements, and you get a rather nice idea for a little puzzle game. One that is, apparently, soon to become a bigger puzzle game. But you can play the 10-level version for free, right now.

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Cadence: Where Physics And Music Fall In Love

By John Walker on March 5th, 2014.

When you watch the first-look video for Cadence, a self-described “zen-like audio-generative puzzle game”, you’re going to stare blankly for the first 40 seconds, unsure why this black and grey thing should be of interest. Then at 41 seconds you’ll go, “Ooooh.” If you don’t, it means you’re rubbish, so you’d best not admit to it.

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Nothing To Hide Is A Very Smart Anti-Stealth Game

By John Walker on February 12th, 2014.

Nothing To Hide‘s statements on privacy and surveillance aren’t subtle. This is a really interesting puzzle game in which you must dutifully spy on yourself, constantly ensuring that government cameras are able to see you wherever you go. And despite currently being in development, it’s entirely in the public domain, copyright free, for code, art, music, etc. “By giving up ‘power’ on my art,” says creator Nick Liow, “my art can have more power.”

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Impressions: Faif

By John Walker on January 28th, 2014.

I adored Puzzle Quest. But I’ve yet to truly adore anything else that’s followed in its wake (including Puzzle Quest 2), with the exception of 10,000,000. There is something spellbinding about 10m’s distillation of the concept, simplifying the combination of match-3 with RPG, down to this fast-paced compulsive madness. (Having finished it twice, I’d like to remind creator Luca Redwood to RELEASE THE NEW CONTENT SOON.)

And then out of Ludum Dare comes Faif. Yes, Faif. It’s the idea minimalised even further. It’s in development now, but playable as that process goes along. New elements are being regularly added, or tweaked, and it’s free to follow along.

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