Posts Tagged ‘Rayman’

Wot I Think: Rayman – Legumes

By Adam Smith on September 12th, 2013.

Rayman: Legends Legumes is the sequel to the unexpectedly brilliant Rayman: Origins Oranges. The latter, starring a character that I had little interest in and whose style of running and jumping didn’t seem particularly suited to the PC, was one of my favourite games of last year. With that in mind, I approached Legumes without any prejudice but instead with a deep-seated cynicism. I am nothing if not my doubts. But is this a rushed and inconsequential sequel or another platforming classic? Here’s wot I think.

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Jazz Hands-Free: Rayman Legends

By Adam Smith on August 15th, 2013.

I hadn’t entirely forgotten that Rayman Legends is coming out on PC, but I had put it to the back of my mind as something to be enjoyed in the distant future. It’s a mark of how quickly this year has slipped through my fingers that the once distant future is now the end of this very month. While I’m slightly horrified that several months seem to have passed without notice, I’m pleased that a return to Michel Ancel’s world of glorious jazzy nonsense is just around the temporal corner. The video below shows a musical level, which looks as precise and demanding as the chest-chases in last year’s Rayman: Oranges. Prepare to hum.

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The PC’s Influence On Long-Term UK Sales

By Kieron Gillen on August 6th, 2010.

A Eurogamer story earlier today got RPS a-chatting. Basically, it was the news that the original Rayman actually spent five whole years on the UK Top 40 charts. That’s 269 weeks. Worms had a 239 week appearance. Theme Park had 172. Loads of more stuff in the article, always interesting – in terms of what sells lengthily rather than immediately. What the feature doesn’t mention is what actually links those three particular games. They’re ones who existed as five-quid PC budget games indefinitely. There was a time in the UK where you couldn’t go into a shop – in fact, didn’t always have to be a game shop – without seeing piles of the big conked little fella there. And, it’s also worth noting, that PC-sales never get their new sales cannibalised by the (non-Top-40-influencing) second-hand market, which is another reason why you end up seeing this enormous longevity in some games.

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