Posts Tagged ‘Robert Yang’

How To Make A Great British Bake Off Game

The latest series of The Great British Bake Off has come to an end, causing those of us hooked by its cream-filled buns, end-of-the-pier puns, and oddly sincere celebration of the human spirit, to feel as empty inside as an incompletely prepared batch of jam donuts. After a few days spent facing a future free from sugar, gluten, and the strange tension between Paul Hollywood and hosts Mel & Sue, I decided to do something about it. I emailed some game designers and asked them a question: if you were charged with making a computer game of The Great British Bake Off, how would you do it?

The answers are below.

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Rub-A-Dub-Dub: Robert Yang’s Rinse And Repeat

It’s late in the year, but between Shower With Your Dad Simulator 2015, Metal Gear Solid V, and now Robert Yang’s Rinse and Repeat [official site], might 2015 become known as The Year of the Video Game Shower? Maybe. You know. It could happen.

A game about scrubbing a hunk in a gym shower, Rinse and Repeat is the latest in Yang’s fascinating series of free sex games exploring physical intimacy, boundaries, body image, gay male culture, and waiting. It’s also his second Twitch have banned.

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Cobra Club: Boner Photography For All [NSFW etc]

The safest for work of all my screenshots

This post is about Cobra Club [official site] – a photo studio game from Robert Yang which revolves around the act of taking pictures of your character’s penis and choosing which, if any, to send to other characters who message you in the game. Quite frankly, everything after the jump will be NSFW. Especially the erection slider.

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Work The Shaft: Pleasure A Gay Car In Stick Shift

“I’m in love with my car,” sang Roger Taylor in a Queen song named just that. They didn’t let him sing lead vocals often, so I guess he’d been bottling that up. Robert Yang’s latest short game is about a man who is, at the very least, in lust with his car. And his car – his gay car – is totally into it.

Stick Shift [official site] is the third game from Yang in the past few months that has been so absurdly, wonderfully, and charmingly gay. You’re trying to get your car off, see, working the gear stick and smoothly changing gears. Oh yes.

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Playable Journalism Journalism: Level With Me Updated


Say, remember when Robert Yang interviewed a load of neat-o level designers while collaborating on a Portal 2 level with them as a sort of playable journalism? I enjoyed the Level With Me series back when I only read RPS, and now I’m here I’m glad I get to post about it.

The first Level With Me creation, made with folks including Brendon Chung, Dan Pinchbeck, Davey Wreden, and Ed Key, had been brokenby a Portal 2 update. Oh no! But this week, Yang released an updated version you can find over here. It’s a fine opportunity to revisit a classic RPS feature.

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“Watch A Dude Stick Stuff In His Mouth”: Succulent


Robert Yang is putting his hunky guy to work. Tanned, groomed, ripped, oil-slicked, and stripped, the same beefcake character model has starred in his last two games exploring gay male sexuality and culture. Last time he implored us to “Hurt Me Plenty” and spank him through a Leap Motion controller, now he and two clones are in control in Succulent with a funny and unsettling seduction involving the sexually aggressive eating of an ice lolly.

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Borges ‘Em Up: Intimate, Infinite

If I were to recommend one author to people wot like games, it’d be Argentine short story writer Jorges Luis Borges. Oh sure, video games crib from loads of fantasy and sci-fi authors, but that’s all set dressing. Borges is closer to what games are. His stories are often systems–rules, puzzles, and riddles–and concepts as much as they are narratives, all supporting each other. And, like the best games, his stories end once they’ve satisfactorily explored their ideas. Many devs I know dig him.

Intimate, Infinite might be a mite puzzling if you don’t know Borges, but I liked it. Released this week by Robert Yang (who did splendid interview-o-game-make series Level With Me for us), it’s an experimental collection of games adapting a Borges story or trying to capture some part of it.

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Wot I Think: Experiment 12

Terry Cavanagh. Jasper Byrne. Ian Snyder. Jack King-Spooner. Richard Perrin. Zaratustra. Michael Brough. Robert Yang. Alan Hazelden. Benn Powell. Jake Clover. TheBlackMask.

You have probably played games by all of these people. VVVVVV might ring a bell. Maybe Lone Survivor or Kairo. Or, if you’re really, really cool, Blues For Mittavinda. Etc, etc, etc. You get the idea. But now they’ve all congealed into a hivemind and made one giant, multi-stage/setting/genre melting pot of madness. Each developer had three days to make a contribution, and then the next creator picked up where the previous left off. Experiment 12 is insane. Experiment 12 is inconsistent. Experiment 12 is beautiful.

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Star-Quashed Lovers: Radiator

Look to the skies. It’s a trailer for the new Polaris, a reworked and extended version of the first of the Radiator experiments. It’s a stargazing, although I imagine some people will consider the eyes to be firmly placed on the navel or shoes. New additions in this version include “completely re-done graphics, interactions, voice acting, narrative, a bit of full-frontal male nudity, and neck-strain-tastic Oculus Rift VR support”. The video contains a rear-end but we’ll have to wait for the full version for the full-frontal. It’s due in August and, for those who haven’t played it before, I’d say it’s the game that has best captured the beauty, stress and banality of being on a date.

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Specially Level With Me, Adam Foster – Part Two

In this very special installment of “Level With Me”, Robert Yang speaks with former celebrity modder / current Valve level designer Adam Foster about his work and process. In Part 2, we cover his work on Portal 2, game architecture, and how to design for players.

Robert Yang: Let’s talk Portal 2. It didn’t have any health-kits or power-ups, so how did you go about guiding players without those breadcrumbs?

Adam Foster: The game often worked best when it kept to the basic structure of the ‘test-chamber’ – walking through a door, GLaDOS says a funny line, you complete the test, GLaDOS says another funny line… It’s that constant, near-ritualised loop which can be subverted now and then, but you have to show the normal routine before the abnormal becomes surprising.
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