Posts Tagged ‘scriptwelder’

Freeware Garden: The Deepest Sleep

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on October 22nd, 2014.

A not particularly spooky door and a pointer.

The Deepest Sleep is a first person, horror point-and-click adventure; the last installment in a trilogy of adventures involving sleeping rather deeply. Happily, never having played its two prequels didn’t spoil my enjoyment. The Deepest Sleep has you diving deep into your nightmares and fighting to find a way out, while avoiding the scary creatures that want you to never wake up again.

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Nearly Brilliant: A Small Talk At The Back Of Beyond

By Nathan Grayson on March 5th, 2013.

As opposed to 'Making Small Talk At The Back Of Beyond,' wherein you survive the end of the world only to realize you have *nothing in common* with your AI partner. It's super awkward.

Oh how I want more games with highly versatile freeform text elements. I don’t just want to be able to talk to the monsters. I long to ponder gut-wrenching philosophical quandaries with the everything. As is, though, the herd’s pretty thin outside of, you know, text adventures. Which makes sense, but there’s still a huge gap that not even surprisingly interesting James Bond advergames can fill. The short version? Façade, for all its potential for immense silliness, was super neat. The shorter version? Again! Again! So I’m pleased as punch when experiments like A Small Talk At The Back Of Beyond pop up – even when they could still use a fair deal of work.

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Lucid Screaming: Deep Sleep

By Adam Smith on October 5th, 2012.

The winner of the 10th Casual Gameplay Design Competition is a browser-based escape the room game in which it’s possible to leave the room after a couple of clicks of the mouse. The larger space from which to escape is actually a dreamscape, made up of gloomy staircases and shadowy rooms. Deep Sleep is a horror game, by golly, and relies on mood rather than jump scares to unsettle. Scratchy pixels and simple puzzles are the furnishings of this haunted house, and the delivery is effective over the very short playtime. There’s no reason for anything that happens – the story is essentially ‘a person has a dream and thinks about it afterwards for a bit’ – but it happens quite well and, given the price of nothing, that’s quite enough for me.

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