Posts Tagged ‘sim-city-2000’

Gaming Made Me: Sim City 2000

By RPS on May 28th, 2011.

This week in Gaming Made Me, Wired UK’s Duncan Geere recalls how Sim City 2000 (and its incredible manual) taught him utopian values, gave him a life-long fascination with impossible habitats and brought about a new sense of just what manner of strange beast is a city.

I still have the manual for SimCity 2000. The game CD, or perhaps even floppy disks — I can’t remember — have long disappeared, but I still own the manual. About once a year, I leaf through it – not for nostalgia, but because it’s such a beautiful creation.
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Retro: SimCity 2000

By Jim Rossignol on January 21st, 2008.


In keeping with our Sim theme, I thought I’d publish this piece which was originally written in summer 2007 for PC Gamer UK’s Long Play series. This look back at SimCity 2000 invites the anger of fans of the subsequent SimCity games by claiming it was the best the series had to offer. Perhaps it’s just me… Perhaps not. If nothing else I think that 2000 captures the quintessential essence of a City game.

This is the one. No subsequent Sim-sequel has been able to capture SimCity 2000′s primal management essence. This is the Sim game upon which all others rest, like resource-pecking vultures on the bones of some perfect Darwinian entity. The isometric depth of this sequel dragged us outwards and upwards from the original SimCity, inspiring us to such an extent that that original compulsion to build and zone and budget seemed flat and parochial by comparison.

2000′s rich spine of management systems and statistical paraphernalia induces the weird urge in all gamers to become tight-fisted local governors. Back in 1994 we couldn’t help but worry about how close the industrial zones were to our suburban housing, or about how much we were spending on road maintenance, or subways, or airports. The same is true in 2007. Once unearthed and installed, a city must be founded, expanded and maintained.
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