Posts Tagged ‘Steve Gaynor’

Level With Me: Play Cohort 2 Now

By Robert Yang on December 16th, 2013.

Level With Me was a series of interviews with game developers about their games, work process, and design philosophy. At the end of each interview, they designed part of a small first person game. You can now download and play the final resulting game!…
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Level With Me, Steve Gaynor

By Robert Yang on October 16th, 2013.

Level With Me is a series of interviews with game developers about their games, work process, and design philosophy. At the end of each interview, they design part of a small first person game. You can play this game at the very end of the series.

Six years ago, Steve Gaynor started as a level designer at Timegate Studios on the F.E.A.R. Perseus Mandate expansion pack. Then at 2K Marin he worked on BioShock 2 and lead designed Minerva’s Den, one of the few respectable DLCs ever made. After a stint at Irrational Games to help with BioShock Infinite, he went indie with some former teammates to form The Fullbright Company. They all made a lovely thing called Gone Home that has won oodles of awards and emotional acclaim.
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Steve Gaynor On The Weirdness Of Gone Home

By Jim Rossignol on May 13th, 2013.


There’s a weird tension to Gone Home. On the one hand it should be the most normal thing in the world: an American household. On the other, well, it’s unusual for games to try and tell stories about everyday lives. But that’s precisely what it does, and that’s just part of what makes it so beautifully weird.

I met Fullbright’s project lead, Steve Gaynor, and talked about that. This is how we got on.
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Will We Ever Get To Play “One City Block”?

By Jim Rossignol on October 31st, 2012.


Following on from my article on the importance of keeping our eye on the future, I’ve started writing what will no doubt be an irregular column on the future of games. I wanted to start with looking at the future of some aspects of game design, and particularly – in the context of the previous column – looking at the kinds of things that have been hoped for or predicted in the past, and have not yet come to be.

Let’s start with Warren Spector’s “One City Block RPG” idea. What is it, and will we ever see it? Fullbright’s Steve Gaynor and a number of devs from Arkane contribute to the discussion that follows, and try to explain the persistent appeal of the One City Block idea as an ideal in game design.
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Fullbright On The Games Gone Home Is And Isn’t Like

By Alec Meer on July 9th, 2012.

Last week, I ran the first half of my recent chat with Steve Gaynor, formerly of Irrational and 2K Marin, and now of indie studio The Fullbright Company – who are working on mysterious, ambitious, suburban-set non-combat first-person game Gone Home. Being as I am an investigative journalist par excellence, I decided that it would be appropriate to spend the second half of the interview forgoing questioning entirely in favour of simply shouting the names of other games at him. Games like Myst, Amnesia, Jurassic Park: Trespasser, Journey and Dear Esther. Rather than hanging up in disgust, he offered fascinating, thoughtful replies on the limits of interactivity in games and the sort of scale Gone Home is intended to operate on.
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Ain’t No Mystery: Fullbright Talks Gone Home

By Alec Meer on July 6th, 2012.

Gone Home is to be the first game from The Fullbright Company, a new indie studio whose formerly mainstream members were previously the prime creators of the excellent BioShock 2 add-on Minerva’s Den, as well as working on assorted other 2K projects. I had a chat with Mr Fullbright himself, Steve Gaynor, about their highly intriguing but equally mysterious non-combat first-person game. Why ditch the guns? Why leave cushty industry jobs to do this? How abstract will it be? How much can the physics be abused? I also made some sweeping generalisations about Columbo.
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Gone Home: Fullbright Shine A Light On Their 1st Game

By Alec Meer on May 8th, 2012.

somebody needs to buy a couple of 100W lightbulbs. 'Fullbright' my arse.

Last week brought very exciting news: I bought a new clock for my wall. Also, that the core team behind the rather good Minerva’s Den add-on for BioShock 2 had gone their own way, founding indie dev The Fullbright Company with the full and noble intention of making a non-violent first-person game as their first project. Today brings yet more exciting news: I’ve just picked up some Euros for my holiday in Greece next week. Also, that the Fullbright Company have just announced and detailed said non-violent first-person game.

It’s called Gone Home, and it’s all about “exploring a modern, residential locale, and discovering the story of what happened there by investigating a deeply interactive gameworld.” It looks and sounds at least 9 intruigings about of a possible 10, even if it yet remains largely as mysterious as a cat’s inner thought processes.
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Minerva’s Decree: Lo, The Fullbright Company Is Formed

By Alec Meer on April 30th, 2012.

So the first game will be about a sentient light bulb?

Just a quick one as a) I don’t have much information for you as yet and b) I managed to hit my head on my own desk really hard earlier and need a lie down, but I thought perhaps some of you would be interested to hear news on The Fullbright Company, aka what the lead designer of the excellent Minerva’s Den add-on for BioShock 2 did next.

After working on assorted BioShocks at 2K Marin and then Irrational, Steve ‘Fullbright’ Gaynor got back together with fellow ex-Marin types and Minerva collaborators Johnnemann Nordhagen and Karla Zimonja, and they’ve set up this new indie studio based out of Portland, Oregon. “We missed working on a small team, on a small project, focused on telling a personal story in a player-driven way. We wanted to do that again. It was fun last time.”
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TechnoShock – BioShock 2: Minerva’s Den

By Alec Meer on August 30th, 2010.

I never thought I’d hear myself say “one of the things I’m most anticipating for the next couple of months is some DLC,” but one of the things I’m most anticipating for the next couple of months is some DLC. Specifically, Minerva’s Den for Bioshock 2. BS2 is, all told, a better game than BS1 for my money, just hampered hugely by over-familiarity and trying to insert an epic new tale into an already-finished story. Steve Gaynor’s upcoming singleplayer vignette sounds like it may well be that much distanced from Rapture’s meta-narrative – both because BS2’s story is now done, and because the announcement of Bioshock Infinite suggests no more Rapture. I’m hoping for a short, self-contained and perhaps more satisfying story that doesn’t resolve itself with another Little Sister-based deus ex machina.

The bad, bad, oh-for-god’s-sakes-you-prats news is that, while console-toy owners can download Minerva’s Den today, it’s coming to PC-land at “a later date.” Let’s hope that’s not a coded dismissal. So let’s make this thread a clarion call from people who are interested in playing this: a message that proves a PC version is a necessity. Trailer below – suggesting homicidal AI has returned to a ‘Shock game…

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Emergent Gameplay: Deus Ex Made Me Part 1

By Kieron Gillen on June 23rd, 2010.

My inspiration for an image totally failed me here.

It’s been a decade since Deus Ex. A realisation struck me: the industry will now be peppered with people whose formative experiences were with Deus Ex. For them it was, in one way or another, inspirational. I decided to hunt down a few and talk to them, about what Deus Ex said to them, how it shaped them, what it taught them and how they bring it into what they make today. By which I mean, drop ‘em a line and say “Deus Ex, eh? Thoughts?”. First up are 2k Marin Designer Steve Gaynor (Bioshock 2) and Ninja Theory Senior Technical Designer Rob Hale (Enslaved: Odyssey To The West)…
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The Cultural Significance Of Video Games

By John Walker on February 16th, 2008.

Level designer and blogger Steve Gaynor has made a superbly inflammatory statement on his site, Fullbright, that “videogames will never become a significant form of cultural discourse“. He goes on to say, “I’ll bet you that fifty years from now they’ll be just as mature and well-respected as comic books are today.” (Those chomping at the bit at this remark will be relieved to learn it’s addressed below).

kultcher, innit?

There has been an interesting reaction from other gaming writers. Newsweek’s excellent games reporter, N’Gai Croal, has been inspired to write a series of essays, reflecting on Gaynor’s post, and that of another response by The Plush Apocalypse’s Borut Pfeifer.

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