Posts Tagged ‘The Bard’s Tale’

Epic Lute: Brian Fargo On Bringing Back The Bard’s Tale

By Richard Cobbett on May 18th, 2015.

Looks like concept art. Is actually in-game shot. Except the logo in the bottom left. That would be INCREDIBLY distracting.

Having successfully brought Wasteland back to life with the help of 61,920 of its closest friends, Brian Fargo and inXile Entertainment are turning their attentions to another classic RPG – The Bard’s Tale [official site]. Forget the appalling comedy vacuum from a few years ago, this is The Actual Bard’s Tale IV, both a return to and modernisation of dungeon crawling with a few new tricks up its sleeve. The Kickstarter begins June 2nd, but Fargo gave us a quick preview of what to expect.

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Brian Fargo’s Eighties Disco: The Bard’s Tale IV

By Adam Smith on January 26th, 2015.

Brian Fargo and the inXile team’s next project will be another revival of an Interplay oldie. Following the success of Wasteland 2, the studio is now turning its attention to The Bard’s Tale, the fantasy dungeon crawling series last seen in 1988 (inXile’s own exhaustingly unfunny parody is an official Bard’s Tale game so let’s ignore it). Fargo announced the game at PAX South, where he confirmed that Kickstarter will be used for funding as with Wasteland 2. He has since taken to Twitter to state that development will focus on a PC version and that InXile will be “dialling up” the atmosphere.

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Humble Bundle With Android 7 Includes Bard’s Tale, Anodyne

By Nathan Grayson on October 16th, 2013.

There are so many Humble Bundles now! Why, back in my day, we had to wait 1417 years (uphill, in the snow, beset on all sides by lackluster deals and also wolverines) for fresh bowls of piping hot generosity, and we… well, I mean, we liked it, yeah, but honestly? We’re talking about great games on the cheap for good causes. So far, more has largely proven to be better. I mean, I haven’t really bought many of the Humble Weeklies, but I definitely appreciate that they exist. Really, my main issue is one of inevitability: the more games get bundled, the higher the likelihood is that I already own them. Case in point: most of Humble Bundle With Android 7.

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Brian Fargo On InXile’s Darkest, Publisher-Driven Days

By Nathan Grayson on August 15th, 2013.

The future is looking very bright for Wasteland 2 and Torment: Tides of Numenera developer inXile. Very bright indeed. Two wildly successful Kickstarters and one nearly complete, maddeningly exciting game later, Brian Fargo and co have finally found their niche. Or rather, they’ve settled back into the comforting clockwork of an old wheelhouse, an old home. But the road to this point was hardly an easy one. The developer-publisher relationship has always been rather skewed, and inXile’s taken its fair share of licks. Some times have been good (see: The Bard’s Tale), and others, well, others have been Hunted: The Demon’s Forge. The latter, especially, is a sore spot for Fargo, but he’s been burned by various publishing arrangements far more than once. He and I discussed that subject, whether Kickstarter is inXile’s permanent solution to that problem, and tons more after I saw Wasteland 2. It’s all below.

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Retro: Tales Of The Unknown: The Bard’s Tale

By Kieron Gillen on August 19th, 2008.

This is the C64 cover, edited so it doesn't have the word C64 on it. Because we have fucking standards. It's basically what the Spectrum cover was. Of course, there's many differences between the PC and Spectrum versions, not least the multiload. Bu who cares, eh?
[The original version of this appeared in PC Gamer. There’s been a handful of additions.]

Maths was always our favourite lesson, for the simple reason we never did any Maths in it. There were always more obvious rebels for the teacher to whip into line than David Hyland, Simon Holmes and myself, crouched over our desks and using the class’ infinite supply of squared paper to copy out each others maps. From a distance, it even looked as if we were working.
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