Posts Tagged ‘Twine’

Looking Twice At Art: Veracity & Purpose

By Laura Kate Dale on November 15th, 2014.

Veracity & Purpose is a free Twine game and an exploration of the works of fictional artist Robert Ells, told entirely through the lens of someone else describing his art as they experience it. Made by Castles in the Sky writer Jack de Quidt, it initially appears to be little more than a guide book to a retrospective. You read about a piece of art, you take in what you can, you move on. But returning for a second look can prove quite rewarding.

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Physically Interactive Fiction: With Those We Love Alive

By Alice O'Connor on November 14th, 2014.

Look, you try taking a good photo of your forearm with a phone camera.

One of these symbols I drew on my arm is a lie. With Those We Love Alive tells you to draw icons on your body to represent key choices and reactions, see, which is a lark until you realise you’re marking and changing yourself in response to cruel and oppressive things. One icon represents something I like to think about myself, but know isn’t true. I stared at that lie a lot the next day.

With Those We Love Alive is a free Twine game by Porpentine, a moving visit to a mundanely monstrous world. Her writing is so carefully measured, vivid yet small bursts, and a soundtrack by Brenda Neotenomie wraps the world around you. It is a beautiful and terrible game.

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Boo: The Uncle Who Works At Nintendo

By Adam Smith on November 11th, 2014.

Michael Lutz made My Father’s Long, Long Legs, which just so happens to be one of my favourite Twine games, and his latest release is right up in the top ten as well. The Uncle Who Works At Nintendo is a horror game that plays on schoolground jealousies, feelings of inadequacy and experimental Nintendo hardware. There are multiple endings, some of which aren’t quite as alarming as others, and the whole story takes place in the few hours leading up to midnight during a sleepover. Best played with headphones on, although sound is atmospheric rather than intended to startle in screamer fashion.

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Happy Kitty, Cat Petting Simulator 2014, Purr Purr Purr

By Cassandra Khaw on November 9th, 2014.

I miss having cats. Four years ago, I left home and became a professional itinerant, leaving my felines in the care of rich strangers. Today, I am bereft of cats and so, you shouldn’t take me as an unbiased source when I say, “Oh, god. Cat Petting Simulator 2014 is the best thing I’ve seen in a long time.”

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Freeware Garden: [R]espawn

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on November 5th, 2014.

That's [R] not R.

Javy Gwaltney, the person responsible for both You Were Made For Loneliness and the (commercial) The Terror Aboard The Speedwell, has returned to his post-cataclysmic science fiction universe with a new Twine-powered text adventure: [R]espawn. A freeware sequel to those games that can perfectly well stand on its own.

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Freeware Garden: Lights Out Please

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on October 29th, 2014.

That's some excellent Twine typography, that is.

Lights Out Please is a collaborative, text-driven horror game that features 13 disturbing stories by 13 diverse authors.

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Freeware Garden: HHH

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on October 23rd, 2014.

Hugo’s House of Horrors, the parser driven shareware adventure game I played back during the dark days of the 5.25″ floppy, was a demented and, many would argue, nonsensical game. It did have a charming, odd, b-movie feel to it, but it played like a drunken person’s Maniac Mansion. For some weird reason though, and despite forcing me to smash a pumpkin just to grab a key, I still fondly remember it.

Now, appearances aside, the freshly crafted HHH is neither a new installment to the Hugo’s House of Horrors series nor a straight up remake, though it does use the original’s all-over-the-place EGA graphics. Also, it’s very very clever.

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Dead Letters: Missive

By Philippa Warr on October 8th, 2014.

Hip hip hooray!

As a lifelong fan of Jessica Fletcher (my Livejournal icon used to be a picture of Columbo wondering WWJD – what would Jessica do?) Missive appears to have been tuned to activate my keyword excitement gland*. It involves a typewriter and a murder mystery

Missive is a Twine entry to this year’s Interactive Fiction Competition. You have a week to solve the murder of Henry Astor, the previous owner of a typewriter you received as a gift. I found myself playing it through three times after being drawn into solving the puzzles so thought I’d flag it up here. Y’know, in case you fancied role playing as a daytime TV amateur sleuth.

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Freeware Garden: Die Sieben Raben

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on September 30th, 2014.

The year is 1876. The place Copenhagen, Denmark. The game Die Sieben Raben by Jón Kristinsson and it really does seem that mysterious gentleman Mr. Amsel has just gotten a most important and plot-forwarding letter.

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Freeware Garden: RocketJumpification

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on September 19th, 2014.

Live by the point, die by the point.

Subaltern Games, the radical game dev studio responsible for jolly world-destructing, money-making sim Neocolonialism, have apparently gone text mad and released the wordy, seriously bonkers and freeware RocketJumpIfication.

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Freeware Garden: Capsule

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on September 9th, 2014.

A starship the size of Wales looks a bit like this.

I am slowly yet surely discovering that I adore illustrated interactive fiction. I believe I could take the thing and live with it on a desert island, where I’d fish and cook and it’d provide me with stuff like Capsule. Ah, yes, it would be a lovely exercise in calm, enlightened misanthropy.

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Freeware garden: Americano

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on August 19th, 2014.

A typical text-adventure screenshot.

They don’t merely dream of electric sheep these days. They have actually reached the point of loving old books and lusting over good looking if vacuous boys. Yes, today’s androids are indeed different. More sophisticated*. More mature perhaps and definitely more interesting as characters in and of themselves than as intriguing sci-fi concepts to be explored.

Evidently, they are also perfectly capable of enjoying cheery tunes during storms of melancholy and, of course, of savoring an Americano.

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Succour And Shelter: The Spare Set

By Adam Smith on August 4th, 2014.

The Spare Set is a free Twine game, commissioned and hosted by the UK homelessness charity Shelter, and written by Rob ‘Black Crown‘ Sherman. It’s the story of a woman arriving home on a day when her life and that of her family is set to change dramatically. Based on the origin of the project, it’s easy to anticipate the general thrust of the narrative but the game’s interest lies in many tales rather than one. The house is a repository of memories, as houses tend to be, and I found one thread that resonated like a nightmare. It involves a spider called Jerome and is ludicrously similar to an experience in my own life. As for the rest, more thoughts below.

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