Posts Tagged ‘uplink’

Humble Android Bundle #3 Is For PC, Mac, Linux Too

By John Walker on August 15th, 2012.

Because Android people are just better than iOS people. FACT.

After a brief foray into the world of music, the Humble folks are back with their third Android bundle. Which is also a PC, Linux and Mac bundle too. Buy them, and you’ll get versions for each. In there this time are BIT.TRIP.BEAT, Fieldrunners, SpaceChem, Uplink and for those who pay above the average, début release Spirits. So that’s quite an… wait, what, Uplink’s out on Android!

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Eurogamer Retro: Uplink

By John Walker on October 4th, 2010.

Hackity hackity hackity hack.

Sometimes, with enough time travel and science, it’s possible to play games from the past. For instance, last week I played Uplink. Then, having done this, I wrote about it. Eurogamer kindly agreed to publish this article on their website, and now I link to it. It’s the circle of life.

I think it taps into a nightmarish fear that we all must have experienced at one time. That thing we did, or may have done without knowing it, that catches up with us. Like that time I paid for a packet of Fruit Pastilles in pennies, knowingly one coin short, and the man in the petrol station said to me: “I won’t count it. I’ll trust you.” Mobil closed down a few years later, which surely has to be at least partly my fault, and I know that one day the policeman will knock on my front door. I’ll look up from the jigsaw puzzle I’m completing with my wife and our two children, and he’ll say, “Are you John Walker? I’m going to have to ask you to come with me.”

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There’s No Point In Posting This

By Jim Rossignol on December 18th, 2007.

Because you all already own copies of Uplink, Darwinia and Defcon, right? So you won’t care that there’s an Introversion Anthology pack up on Steam containing all three games for just $20…

Hmm.

Yeah, that’s a videogame.

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RPS Talks To Introversion’s Chris Delay

By Jim Rossignol on September 11th, 2007.

One of the PC’s finest features is its ability to allow small, eccentric development teams to create great games without constraints. The spirit of the bedroom programmers of the ’80s is just about living on PCs across the world. One such home-grown PC team are the British IGF winners, Introversion, who have been something of an inspiration in their attitude towards game development: the kinds of games they have decided to develop appeal to something basic about gaming. It’s not a Retro appeal, so much as timeless. Uplink, Darwinia and DefCon each have their own encapsulated, deliberately self-contained idea, and each sits just outside the commercial comfort zones. These titles do what indie games do best: surprise, entertain, and challenge.

So how does Introversion’s central programmer, the superbly-named Chris Delay, feel about independent game development in 2007? “Alive and well! PCs are still the best place to play genuinely indie games made by very small teams. It’s worth keeping up with events like the IGF – a lot of teams that do well show up later as serious game developers. I think people’s interest in indie gaming has been slowly rising and this is definitely a good thing.”

Introversion came away from the IGF as stars, but are now somewhat distancing themselves from their indie roots, with increased commercial success thanks to their exposure on Valve’s Steam sales platform: “We’re big fans,” says Delay. “Of course we’d say that, since all three of our games are now available to buy on Steam. But it’s such a convenient system. I recently reached the end of my patience with Vista and wiped the hard disk, and installed XP from scratch. After installing Steam I had easy access to the latest versions of every game I’d bought over the system. From a company point of view Valve offer a direct link to a huge number of customers who might otherwise never have heard of our games. Certainly with Darwinia, Steam was kind of a saviour for us and sold Darwinia in quantities we’d never seen before. With Defcon (and all of our future games, we hope) we released the game on Steam and on our website and in the high street simultaneously. We’ve found that players like the choice – some people want the convenience of Steam, some people want it direct from the creators and not tied to any system, and some people like to walk into town to buy.”

And some of us just want to get rid of the towers of CDs and DVD boxes that currently dominate our tiny box-room offices…

Read on for thoughts on Multiwinia, Subversion, and the future of Introversion.
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