Posts Tagged ‘Webgibberish’

“You’re A Real Winner, Kid”

By Jim Rossignol on August 8th, 2007.

This thread over on the Quarter To Three games forum discusses whether the PC was the “real winner” of the latest generation console wars. The thread author suggests that the PC will ‘win’ by virtue of having lots of console games converted to it at a later date, but I think the reality is a little more subtle. If there is something to be learned from the current spread of games then it’s not necessarily the brute number of conversions to PC that matters – it’s the money going into the really significant games. Publishers need to figure out how much they can spend on a game, and they’ll spend more if it’s likely to do well on a console as well as a PC.

Quake Wars has undoubtedly benefited from being converted to 360. The console format meant that the team had to factor bots into the game – a fact that gave them extra months to polish the game as a whole, and also means that instead of a pure multiplayer game we also now get bots to play with.

Bioshock is another example. There’s little doubt that it would have been a masterpiece whatever the format – but more money would have been coughed up for the overall development costs because it’s going to be on 360, and not just ‘conversion costs’ either, since these tend to disappear into the overall equation of running a studio anyway.

Perhaps the only “real winners” are the gamers, on whatever format they choose to play. As long as there’s no monopoly, no dominating format, then publishers and developers will be compelled to deliver their games for everyone, however they choose to play. If a developer keeps their game to just one format, and invests accordingly, then the studios aren’t going to be able to exploit those deep pockets to their fullest potential. Cross-platform profit margins, I salute you.

.

1 Comment »

A Rose By Any Other Name

By Kieron Gillen on August 2nd, 2007.

We admit, we’ll jump at any chance to use this screenshot again…

YOU SLAG! YOU COW! YOU SLAG! YOU COW!

Rossignol already talked at length about the simple joys of cat-fighting game, Rose & Camellia, but the exciting news that someone has actually translated it into English deserved another plug. So now, at last, those who would haven’t played it, due to them needing to experience the divine narrative carefully crafted by the modern heirs to the spirit of Gogol with their face-flapping, or it’s just not worthwhile (i.e. Walker, probably) can finally get down with the slapattacks.

, , , .

3 Comments »

YOU WILL NOT EVER BE DEBTLESS

By Kieron Gillen on July 19th, 2007.

Wise, wise words.

While clearly I can’t match Jim’s Rose & Camellia from yesterday (though I can beat Jim’s progress at the game itself – he only got to the maid, whilst I beat down the enormous Medusa Woman who descended from the skies for slap-vengeance) I can at least provide a piece of net-game strangeness that’s somewhere in the same league.

Take that, advanced capitalism. I bet you feel really ashamed now. Like, really.

It’s called Game, Game, Game and again Game (with the subtitle “or belief systems are small clumsy rolling-type creatures”) and was created by one Jason Nelson. It can be best described as a collision between Manic Miner and mid-period Radiohead CD Covers. And it can be played here. It’s a series of single-screen platform games with a strong glitch-aesthetic, the level getting increasingly distorted with cut-up poetry and enormous scribbles every time you pick up something. Also, includes the best use of FMV since the beautiful bald head of him from Command and Conquer.

It’s phenomenally pretentious. It’s phenomenally funny. It’s certainly phenomenally something.

Honestly, we’ll post something on something triple-A and shiny tomorrow. No, really.

, , , .

4 Comments »

Rose & Camellia

By Jim Rossignol on July 18th, 2007.

The Independent Gaming Source regularly blogs come interesting ‘indie’ material, but this Japanese Flash game based around aristocratic feminine face slapping is one of the finest referrals so far.

Translation honours go to Selectbutton who report that:

The plot, according to the text below the game, is that the player girl is a commoner who marries into a noble family. One day after the marriage, her new husband breathes his last—but the pampered harpies running the House refuse to give this low-blood the honor that is her due. There is only one way to resolve the matter!

And that’s flicking your mouse across the screen to pulp the chops an array of snooty harridans. I wish I could offer some kind of critical dissection of this, the slapping game. And yet all I can think is that this is the only game ever to have an oscillating “slapping slider” dictate your attack rate.

, , , , .

10 Comments »

Everybody! Everybody!

By John Walker on July 18th, 2007.

The sheer unhindered joy that is Homestar Runner is on a short hiatus at the moment, since one of the Bros. Chaps has gone and had a baby, and apparently that’s somehow more important than drawing a Flash cartoon on the internet.

However, during the gap – and thankfully making writing about it relevant to this site – there’s been an update to their excellent Videlectrix site. Should you be unitiated, a part of the H*R nonsense is Strong Bad’s archaic computer, and the games that play on it. Celebrating the pixellated joy of the earliest PC games, and indeed their Acorn, Spectrum, etc counterparts, these spoof minis do a surprising job of being almost as good as the real thing.

None are so great as the Thy Dungeonman series, capturing the inane nature of text adventures better than the text adventures ever did.

Where's an egg?

But filling my needs just now is the newly published Where’s An Egg? Described as a game bought overseas, and coming without an instruction booklet, it’s been impossible to play until the recently discovered single page from the instructions found on an auction site. It seems like you’re maybe, sort of, supposed to identify who is lying and who is telling the truth, and thus learn who has an egg. Also you can shoot people. It is so perfectly reminiscent of that one tape you had in an unmarked box that you could never figure out, but yet felt compelled to play.

, .

1 Comment »