Super Many-o Brothers: Hello Worlds!

Hello Worlds! is a splendid 2-4 player platform game for one player.

Created by clever sorts on the University of Washington Computer Science course, it’s at first glance another clutch of ‘collect all the shiny things and get to the exit’ jumping puzzles. Thing is that you’re trying to do this in four levels at once. Move your blobbly pixel-octopus thing in one screen, and its actions will be precisely mirrored in the three others – and affected by them. So, walking across a platform in one will have him apparently floating in mid-air in another, or your progress in one will be invisibly impeded by a wall in another.

It’s along the same lines of the mirror/clone system that indie games such as P.B. Winterbottom have dabbled in so frequently of late, but in this one your control is never anything less than direct and absolute. What I find most interesting is how my brain adapts to it – initial panic at the strangeness of controlling four synchronised characters in four asynchronous worlds, soon replaced by keeness of observation, somehow able to monitor all four screens without discombobulation.

Try it. You’ll like it. And so will your three imaginary friends.

17 Comments

  1. Ian says:

    I thought the difficulty curve on it was weird in that there was a chunk in the middle that was significantly easier than the stuff at the start and the stuff at the end.

    Really enjoyed it though. Not tried any of the old/incomplete concepts yet.

  2. BigJonno says:

    Wow, the speed at which your brain adapts to that is amazing!

  3. lhzr says:

    game’s great. thanks for pointing it out, alec.

  4. Rakysh says:

    Really good, but needs mute, yo. I know it’s a silly thing and really superficial, but it’s just arrogant to assume I would rather listen to the devs noise that the three other audio things I have running at the same time.

    • Dworgi says:

      It’s a Flixel game, so pressing 0 mutes it (1-9 change the volume). The controls are shown in the pause menu (P).

  5. Ian says:

    Anonymous Coward said:
    Really good, but needs mute, yo. I know it’s a silly thing and really superficial, but it’s just arrogant to assume I would rather listen to the devs noise that the three other audio things I have running at the same time.

    Press 0.
    If you pause it (‘p’) it tells you that. Though I admit I only discovered the pause menu by accident.

    Looking for Goblins for fleeing, stomping and other assorted sports-related activities.

    Long life-expectancy not required.

  6. Rakysh says:

    AHAH! Thanks. I’d just stopped playing out of earpain, now I can return.

  7. Premium User Badge

    Cooper says:

    Kongregate is unusable on netbook screens.

    Go to:
    link to cs.washington.edu

    To play the game without all the kongregate-bad-web-design-faff around the game itself.

  8. chad says:

    I quit fairly quickly. I thought it was enjoyable but the gimmick didn’t hold any real gameplay value (at least in the first world)– it was purely an optical exercise. Basically a jumping game where some blocks are invisible, right? The world underneath is consistent and solid, unaffectable by you. Not a bad game, at all, but somehow it stops short of having the unusual element (multiple worlds) affect the actual GAME.

  9. Ian says:

    Anonymous Coward said:
    I quit fairly quickly. I thought it was enjoyable but the gimmick didn’t hold any real gameplay value (at least in the first world)– it was purely an optical exercise. Basically a jumping game where some blocks are invisible, right? The world underneath is consistent and solid, unaffectable by you. Not a bad game, at all, but somehow it stops short of having the unusual element (multiple worlds) affect the actual GAME.

    Later on it goes more into doors that switch worlds off, opens new worlds, flips worlds, etc. You start to get more puzzle-y elements.

  10. Ricc says:

    Nice game, I liked it! The only thing that bothered me was that viewing all worlds at the same time (c) wasn’t snappy enough. One particular level requires you to configure all four worlds, using blue doors. The small delay after pressing c became notably tedious at that point. Otherwise excellent!

  11. EthZee says:

    I liked it. My imaginary friends were ambivalent about the whole thing.

  12. Bret says:

    Good fun.

    I only got stuck once, puzzles were clever. Finished the whole thing, and it was worth a late lunch.

  13. pupsikaso says:

    You were right, Alec. I love it.

  14. Lambchops says:

    Was about to send an email highlighting this; good thing I did a search first or I’d have had egg on my face.

    Bit on the easy side (I never found myself needing the overlay or getting stuck at all) but a nice concept and a very enjoyable half hour or so of gaming.