Musical Wandering: Porapora

Pretty.

Come on, that’s enough. You’ve had enough. It’s noon. Get up. Get out of the house. I’m going for a swim, and if you’re still there when I get back, I’ll be sorely disappointed. We follow a strict Victorian physical code here, you know: a brisk walk, a dunk in some nice cold water, then a seven-course lunch once we’re all back. Don’t pout. Oh, at the very least, do go for a virtual walk. It’ll still enrich you, and might help you shake your grumps off if you’re playing the delightful Porapora.

Porapora is a free walking simulator created for 7 Day FPS by Flex Roman and Héloïse Lozano. We wander around a colourful forest, leaves crunching underfoot, and make our own music by brushing up against things. While Proteus had a constant background soundtrack that our movement played into and expanded, Porapora’s just a walk until we touch anything.

I do like that flora needs to be touched to make a noise. On my own woodland wanderings, I’m always careful not to cause damage but touch everything that looks to have an interesting texture. Craggy bark, exposed sapwood, smooth leaves, ruffed ferns, damp soil, soft fungi – I touch ’em all. And wash my hands afterwards, of course.

The view can get a bit jittery, you’ll notice in the video. I suspect that might be because Porapora was created in GameMaker, which isn’t really made for 3D first-person games. I’ve played other GameMaker 3D FPSs that were fine, though. Mysteries!

6 Comments

Top comments

  1. FlexRoman says:

    Hi, thanks for the article (from Héloise too) :3

    The jittering is due to the crazy sprites we used (scaled a lot too big) and because of a shitty camera script that has like 50% chance of bugging depending of the project, I'm working on that.
    We hope to add the features we didn't have the time to implement to enhance the musical interactions.

    And thanks Muppetizer for taking the time to look for all that, I need to make a recap of all these things as soon as I'm done with working on Anarcute
  1. Monggerel says:

    The jittering is supposed to be the fine film of neurotoxins you’ve accumulated over your everything setting in, I think.

  2. RaoulDuke says:

    Alice, your voice freaks me out. I’m still not convinced you aren’t an advanced AI with near-perfect speech synthesis, those pictures of blue-haired women are just human clones you keep in your robot-cupboard aren’t they!!?!

    If you could read this out – link to imdb.com – we can settle it once and for all, your programming *should* force you to narrate those quotes and put them in a youtube video for many laughs.

    • SlimShanks says:

      Now that you’ve pointed that out, I can’t help but agree. You know, it would make sense that RPS at some point reached the limits of seriously silly but insightful games journalism, and created the advanced AI ALiCe to compute previously unheard of levels of wit and comedic timing.
      Also, I just can’t get into walking simulators. I did really enjoy Dear Esther, but only once. That said, I often spend inordinate amounts of time walking around in games not really meant for it. I can’t even estimate the number of times which I have been killed because I was busy looking at a pretty flower…

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    Bluerps says:

    Ms O’Connor, what happened to your column about walking simulators? It was really nice!

  4. Muppetizer says:

    This was great, checking out the designer’s blog lead me to this tigforums post on a (very early) project of his. I friggin’ love that art style.
    Also this was a fun and very different game to Porapora, there’s an interesting darkworld, or lack of a better term, mechanic that pops into it at a certain point, which was just cool! I think this could be someone to watch.

  5. FlexRoman says:

    Hi, thanks for the article (from Héloise too) :3

    The jittering is due to the crazy sprites we used (scaled a lot too big) and because of a shitty camera script that has like 50% chance of bugging depending of the project, I’m working on that.
    We hope to add the features we didn’t have the time to implement to enhance the musical interactions.

    And thanks Muppetizer for taking the time to look for all that, I need to make a recap of all these things as soon as I’m done with working on Anarcute