Vomculus: NoLimits 2 Roller Coaster Sim Adds Rift

How are your guts doing?

As someone with eyes too shrewd to fall for the smoke and mirrors of Oculus Rift (the images don’t merge), I seek alternative entertainment from cybergoggles. I want to stand by and titter as people with gullible eyes experience horrible and terrifying things, wailing and flailing as they sit in comfy chairs with black boxes strapped for their foreheads. I am very keen to watch people playing NoLimits 2 Roller Coaster Simulation with its newly-added Rift support. I might shake their chair gently then leap back away from the torrent of vomit. You and your foolish eyes.

One of the first big popular Rift showcase games was a version of Epic’s tech demo Epic Citadel with a roller coaster boshed in, thrilling and delighting folks with its twists and turns. Oh, how I’ve enjoyed seeing people go through that! So an actual proper roller coaster simulation, with real roller coasters really proven to make real people really spew, will be a rare treat for me.

I suppose it’ll also be deeply thrilling for roller coaster fans. I’d recommending pointing a fan at your face and slipping plastic coat hangers over your arms to capture more of that roller coaster feeling.

NoLimits 2, I suppose I should explain if it isn’t already clear enough, is a roller coaster sim where folks can build their own dream coasters or recreate real-world favourites then ride them in 3D shinyvision, and share them with others. A demo’s over here (and on Steam) if you’re curious. It’s also on sale at the moment, down to £22.39 from the maker and on Steam.

Now imagine a person of a nervous disposition going through this player-made horror on Rift, fighting to resolve the disconnect between what their eyes see and their body feels:

11 Comments

  1. Shardz says:

    The first game was fantastic and I still have it installed with a ton of user made tracks. It’s the best in roller coaster simulation that I have ever seen. However, the editor is the most archaic piece of software I have ever seen and you’d be better served learning AutoCAD to make everything from scratch. It’s math intensive and offers a UI similar to something one would discover in the early 90’s. Unless someone has written something much more serviceable over the years, I simply gave up after sweating for two days with my basic track.

    The sequel looks fantastic, but I certainly hope there is some resolve for that clumsy editor as making your own coasters is half the fun!

    • jrodman says:

      One of those cases where a certain slice of simplicity is far better than completeness.

  2. badirontree says:

    Are they trying to make people throw up ? :P

  3. Leafcutter says:

    I wonder if it’s possible to build that in real life and if it could how much would it cost lol

    -LC-

  4. CookPassBabtridge says:

    Hi Alice, does the IPD measurement tool not help with your wibbly non-merged images?

    • WhatKateDoes says:

      Ya, non mergey 3D view is a sure sign of the IPD not being right – an all too likely possibility where people are demoing the Rift to multiple users, I’m guessing most demonstrators leave the IPD set to default or their own personal setting. I created individual approximate settings (using the gender/height thing) for my friends & family, but still had to adjust one very specifically for a wide-set-eyes friend.

      • Alice O'Connor says:

        I haven’t fiddled with that, but my eyes also don’t work with the Nintendo 3DS or 3D movies. I’m sticking with clever eyes.

        • the jester says:

          On the off chance you don’t know, you almost certainly lack depth vision (or have diminished stereoscopic vision). It’s fairly common and most people don’t believe it when they’re told. Even though you probably doubt this, try an online test link to mediacollege.com or go ask an optometrist.

          P.S.: 3D things (like the oculus rift) work fine if you keep one eye closed (they won’t be 3d but they won’t appear as blurry lines or the like)